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Old 02-23-2017, 09:14 AM
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Default "Gold Dust Woman"'s fab 15

'Gold Dust Woman': Stevie Nicks' fab 15

What is it about Stevie Nicks that people find so enchanting?

You got an hour?

The spellbinding Fleetwood Mac songstress returns to Salt Lake City -- where she actually lived from 1961-64 when she was in junior high and just into high school -- on Saturday night when she brings her solo "24 Karat Gold" tour to Vivint Smart Home Arena. Tickets range from $49 to $147, and The Pretenders will open the show, which is scheduled to start at 7 p.m.

Nicks broke onto the national scene in a big way when she and then-boyfriend Lindsey Buckingham joined Fleetwood Mac in 1975. Two of her songs from that first album -- "Rhiannon" and "Landslide" -- became big hits for the band and are certainly emblematic of her lyrical prowess and ability to weave tales and moods, not just with her words but also with her haunting and somewhat husky vocals. Her stage attire, complete with long flowing dresses and skirts, shawls, platform heel boots and the occasional tophat also added to her stage allure.

Her hits, both in Fleetwood Mac and during successful side stints as a solo performer, kept coming through the years, with tunes like "The Edge of Seventeen," "Stand Back," "Dreams," "Silver Springs," "Gypsy," "I Can't Wait," "Gold Dust Woman" and many more all fitting the Nicks mold and furthering her Rock and Roll Hall of Fame career.

In honor of her concert Saturday, and to give fans an invigorating playlist to run through in preparation for the show, we have ranked our 15 favorite Nicks songs (including both her solo and Fleetwood Mac highlights).

Enjoy!


15 -- "If Anyone Falls"

This synth-driven single came off Nicks' second solo album, 1983's "The Wild Heart." It rose to No. 15 on the Billboard Hot 100, and hit No. 8 on the U.S. Mainstream Rock charts.


14 -- "Has Anyone Ever Written Anything For You"

This heartfelt ballad has an intriguing backstory. During a time when she was romantically involved with Joe Walsh, the Eagles guitarist took her to a park in Colorado where he had a drinking fountain installed and a plaque inscribed to his daughter Emma, who had died in 1974 at the age of 3 as the result of injuries from a traffic accident. According to the liner notes for her "Timespace" greatest hits album in 1991, Nicks said she had been complaining about things in general a little too much and that Walsh brought her to this park, telling her that the only thing his daughter ever complained about was not being able to reach the drinking fountain. Walsh wrote a song for his daughter ("Song For Emma" on 1974's "So What"), and Nicks in turn wrote this for him. "So he wrote a song for her, and I wrote a song for him," Nicks said in the liner notes. "'This is your song,' I said to the people ... but it was Joe's song. Thank you, Joe, for the most committed song I ever wrote. ... But more than that, thank you for inspiring me in so many ways. Nothing in my life ever seems as dark anymore, since we took that drive."


13 -- "Gold Dust Woman"

The closing track on Fleetwood Mac's monster 1977 "Rumours" album, "Gold Dust Woman" was actually released as the B side to hit "Don't Stop." In recent years, Nicks has said she's not quite entirely sure what the song is about, but thinks cocaine was clearly involved, as well as drawing on someone getting out of a bad relationship and trying to make it. Of course, that was the primary theme for most of the "Rumours" album as both Nicks and guitarist Lindsey Buckingham, as well as married band members Christine and John McVie were all going through prolonged breakups at the time.


12 -- "Rooms on Fire"

"Rooms on Fire" was the lead single for Nicks' 1989 solo endeavor, "The Other Side of the Mirror." It hit No. 16 on the Billboard Hot 100 and No. 1 on the Mainstream Rock charts.


11 -- "Talk to Me"

One of two singles from Nicks' 1985 solo album, "Rock a Little," this catchy tune didn't quite catch on with radio listeners -- only making it to No. 57 on the Billboard Hot 100. That fact notwithstanding, it's still a great tune.


10 -- "Gypsy"

This song is vintage Nicks lyrical imagery. It was written in 1979 at the height of Fleetwood Mac's fame, but takes its theme from a simpler time, when Nicks and guitarist Lindsey Buckingham shared an apartment, but were so without wealth that they slept on a mattress on the floor that Nicks decorated with lace. Nicks has said that whenever she feels a need to reconnect with her roots, she will take her mattress and put it on the floor for a while. "Gypsy" was the second single off Fleetwood Mac's "Mirage" album in 1982. It peaked at No. 12 on the Billboard Hot 100.


9 -- "Leather and Lace"

Ironically, Nicks wrote this song for a Waylon Jennings and Jessi Colter duets album -- but it didn't make the cut. Instead, she cut it with one of the best rock voices ever put to record, Eagles drummer and vocalist Don Henley. The song, appearing on Nicks' debut solo record, "Bella Donna," was released in late 1981 and peaked at No. 6 on the Billboard Hot 100 in January of 1982.


8 -- "Silver Springs"

This song actually has quite the history in Fleetwood Mac lore. Written about Mac guitarist Lindsey Buckingham, the song was originally recorded to be part of the band's epic "Rumours" album -- where it would have been a perfect thematic fit with all the inner-band romantic turmoil. Where it didn't fit, however, was in the time restrictions of vinyl records in that day. Because of the length of the song, and all the other strong material, "Silver Springs" was a last-minute cut from the album, a fact which didn't sit well with Nicks. Instead, it appeared as the B side to "Go Your Own Way." The song led to further band discord when Nicks wanted to include it on her "Timespace" album in 1991 -- but Fleetwood Mac drummer Mick Fleetwood refused, which in turn led to Nicks leaving the band outright for a spell. Fleetwood Mac eventually included the song in a 1992 box set and it also appeared in 1997's live album, "The Dance," which marked the return of both Buckingham and Nicks to the band.


7 -- "I Can't Wait"

Also coming from 1985's "Rock a Little" album -- this track actually does rock, a lot. The upbeat track hit a high of No. 16 on the Billboard Hot 100. It rose to No. 6 on the Mainstream Rock charts.


6 -- "Dreams"

As the legend goes, Nicks said she wrote this song off by herself in about 10 minutes during the sessions for the "Rumours" album. She came back to the main studio and shared it with the rest of the band, who were not all that enamored with it in the beginning. Naturally, it went on to be the band's highest-charting -- and only No. 1 -- single.


5 -- "Stop Draggin' My Heart Around"

The lead single of the "Bella Donna" album, this track introduced the world to Nicks as a solo artist. Ironically, she had nothing to do with writing it. It was a finished track by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, that they instead offered to her because it was felt the lyrics were primarily delivered from the female perspective. The track features some signature drumming by Stan Lynch and same tasty, melodic lead guitar by Michael Campbell. The vocal back and forth between Nicks and Petty in this duet proved perfect for the song's subject matter. "Stop Draggin' My Heart Around' vaulted to No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 and was instrumental -- along with the album's subsequent three singles, "The Edge of Seventeen," "Leather and Lace" and "After the Glitter Fades" -- in lifting "Bella Donna" to the No. 1 position on the Billboard 200 albums chart, an extraordinary coup for Nicks in her solo debut.


4 -- "Stand Back"

This powerhouse of a song was actually written on Nicks' lone wedding day -- on Jan. 29, 1983. As she and then-husband Kim Anderson were driving to leave on their honeymoon, Prince's "Little Red Corvette" came on the radio. The tune inspired Nicks to write "Stand Back" that night in the couple's honeymoon suite. (How's that for a honeymoon night story?) Prince actually played synthesizer on the song when it was later recorded. Nicks' marriage was fated to only last a few months, but "Stand Back" has certainly stood the test of time. Peaking at No. 5 on the Billboard Hot 100, the song is so good that it remains a Fleetwood Mac concert staple as well.


3 -- "Landslide"

Another song written squarely around the Nicks-Buckingham dynamic, "Landslide" has gone on to be one of Fleetwood Mac's -- and Nicks' -- signature tunes. Appearing on 1975's eponymous "Fleetwood Mac" album, the duo's first with the band, the song wasn't even released as a single until it was redone as a live version for 1997's "The Dance" album. It ended up going gold and has sold more than a million copies to date. It is also a highly covered song by other artists, with notable versions being done by The Smashing Pumpkins, The Dixie Chicks and the TV show "Glee."


2 -- "The Edge of Seventeen"

This epic song is the definitive Stevie Nicks solo rocker, with a memorable guitar riff by Waddy Wachtel setting the tone throughout. Her lyrics and vocals on this tune are also vintage Nicks, featuring her distinctive, husky howl. The song's subject matter was inspired by two deaths that occurred very close to each other in December of 1980 -- John Lennon and Nicks' uncle Jonathan. The song peaked at No. 11 on the Billboard Hot 100 and at No. 4 on the Mainstream Rock chart. It remains a staple on classic rock radio today.


1 -- "Rhiannon"

"Rhiannon" was Nicks' first contribution to Fleetwood Mac, and were that the only song she'd ever written, it would still define her as a rock icon. Named after a Welsh witch from a novel Nicks read prior to joining the band, "Rhiannon" paints a haunting lyrical metaphor of unfulfilled desire revolving around a bird in flight, a cat in the darkness and a woman taken by the wind. Nicks' early performances of the song were the stuff of legend. (Just check out the accompanying video for an example.) By a show of hands, how many of you ended up naming a daughter after this song? (I'm raising my hand.) I love my daughter, love the name and love this song -- in that order!



http://www.heraldextra.com/entertain...2a8ada7c0.html
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Old 02-23-2017, 09:33 AM
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TALK TO ME peaked at #4 on the US Hot 100 and #1 on Rock. Not #57. The writer confused it with "Maybe love can change your mind."
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Old 02-23-2017, 10:19 AM
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And "If Anyone" hit #14, not # 15 right?

Calling a fact checker!
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Old 02-23-2017, 05:22 PM
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Originally Posted by blinker12 View Post
And "If Anyone" hit #14, not # 15 right?

Calling a fact checker!
Yep it did ..this person must not have been around in the mid 1980s .. Talk to Me was all over FM and AM radio.
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Old 02-23-2017, 09:38 PM
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Unnecessary hate for Talk to Me. It's up there with her biggest hits which makes the comment quite embarrassing really.
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Old 02-23-2017, 10:11 PM
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Unnecessary hate for Talk to Me. It's up there with her biggest hits which makes the comment quite embarrassing really.
It isn't really hate....they call it "catchy" and "great." They are just reporting incorrect information about its chart performance.
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Old 02-24-2017, 09:48 AM
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I corrected the writer and he thanked me and changed the info to the correct chart positions
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Old 02-24-2017, 03:05 PM
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CONCERT PREVIEW: STEVIE NICKS AND THE PRETENDERS AT THE VIV

Signs, T-shirts and feminist mantras all around have been declaring it: The Future is Female.

What they don’t tell you is that the past was female, too—and the present is female. That’s why two of the best and most groundbreaking female artists from the ’70s through today are coming to The Viv Arena Saturday night in a double billing that has me, as the kids would say, totally stoked.

Chrissy Hynde and the Pretenders will open the show (though only Hynde remains the constant in the group, she really IS the group). Hynde has always mixed gritty vocals with sounds infused with everything from Sam Cooke to underground punk for a trademark rocking sound.

And then there’s the main event, Miss Wasatch Junior High herself, Stevie Nicks.

Nicks is, of course, part of Fleetwood Mac (and all the drama within), a style icon and one of the best songwriters of all-time. She does it all with a persona she says she adopted to create the coolness of Grace Slick, the chillness of Jimi Hendrix, and the attitude of Janis Joplin—but after 40 years in the public eye now she’s the one emulated.

She’s sure to come onto the stage in high-heeled boots, something lacey, leathery or velvet or all at the same time. She’s a gypsy-chic role model and remains an alternative—with gender-normative femininity—to counter the edgier-looking women of her time, like Hynde and Debbie Harry.

On this tour, the 24 Karat Gold Tour, Nicks is digging deep in the catalog for songs that are cult-favorites, radio mainstays or just have a good story attached to them. Previous show reviews predict that fans should expect Fleetwood Mac tunes to turn up mid-set—and for Hynde to provide support in the duet Nicks first recorded with Tom Petty, “Stop Dragging My Heart Around.”.

Talk about girl power.



Stevie Nicks and Pretenders play Vivint Home Arena on Saturday, Feb. 25. Tickets are available here.

https://saltlakemagazine.com/concert...retenders-viv/
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Old 02-26-2017, 07:16 AM
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RECAP: Salt Lake City, UT – Vivint Smart Home Arena


On Saturday night, Stevie Nicks performed at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City — the second show of Leg 2 and 30th show overall. Salt Lake City was one of many cities where Stevie spent time as a child. She mentioned having a personal attachment to the snowy area during her introduction for “Landslide.”

Thanks and much love to McKell Richardson, Christine Hall, and LA for sharing these pictures.












Transcriptions:

Starshine
I went to Tom Petty’s house somewhere around 1981/1982. Maybe…it could have even been 1979, actually, probably was. And I went over to his house and I had my guitar in hand, in the case so I looked totally serious, even though I had super long nails which meant: Why are you bothering to bring your guitar? Because it looked good. So I would go over there once in a while and we’d like sit and write. So I walked in, I said ‘So I think I have a good song. I have a good poem, and I think the melody’s good.’ So he said, ‘OK, well, play it for me.’ No pressure. So I sit down at the piano and I play this song and he likes it! And he doesn’t like everything so you’ll thrilled when he does like something. So I said, ‘OK, good, so does that mean we can maybe record it?’ And he’s like, ‘Yeah, OK, well, OK, all right.’ And I said, ‘Are The Heartbreakers coming over?’ And goes like, ‘Yeah they’re kind of on their way.’ So they came slowly in.
And so anyway, long story short, we recorded this song, and it took like 20 minutes. It was really easy and…because I only three or four chords. So it was really easy, and it came out great, even the lead vocal was even good. So if he had been doing a record, or if I had been doing a record, it would have went on one of those records. But neither of us was doing a record so it went into the ‘gothic trunk of lost songs.’ And it stayed there until two years ago when I went to Nashville and took all my demos that were in the ‘gothic trunk of lost songs’ and recorded them exactly like they were on their demos. So here it is and it’s called ‘Starshine.’


Landslide
Thank you. So that’s one of the five or six songs that have also been played every single time on the stage pretty much. And every once in a while I will say to whoever is the band, ‘So why don’t we just not do ‘Rhiannon’ this time, and this is the reaction I get… [gasps!]. So I go like, ‘OK!’
So this next song…and yes, there’s one more! There’s like maybe seven of those songs. And I wrote this song in Aspen. I totally wish I had written it here, but I wrote it in Aspen. It’s the only time I’d been in the snow covered mountains, snow covered hills or mountains, except for when I was here. I should have written it when I lived here because I was certainly more attached to here than I was the two months I spent in Aspen. And I wrote it in someone’s living room looking out over this beautiful view and trying to make a decision on what to do with my musical life. And so anyway, little did that little girl know that that song would really take her to the top. And that’s another way to tell you all that one little thing…because it may happen for you. Always keep your eyes open because that could be it. So here it is, ‘Landslide.’


Videos and Twittersphere on the main page: http://stevie-nicks.info/2017/02/rec...rt-home-arena/

Last edited by SisterNightroad; 02-26-2017 at 03:08 PM..
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Old 02-26-2017, 07:19 AM
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Old 02-26-2017, 02:54 PM
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'Talk to Me': Stevie Nicks chats up Vivint Arena in memorable SLC return
















Stevie Nicks was in a chatty mood Saturday night at Vivint Smart Home Arena.

Maybe it was because the rock icon was back in her onetime hometown of Salt Lake City. Maybe it was because she was excited to return to the road for the bonus round of her "24 Karat Gold Tour," with this show being just the second in a 20-date tour extension that kicked off Thursday in Reno following a two-month break. Maybe it was a side effect of the Gold Dust Woman's desire to sprinkle intimate insight and detail into the background of nearly every tune in her 18-song set.

Whatever the reason, Nicks split her two hours and 15 minutes on stage between singing and sharing stories from behind the music of her illustrious 44-year recording career. And you know what? Give us more shows like this -- ones where it's as if the artist is standing in your living room and carrying on a musical conversation at their own relaxed pace rather than punching some imaginary time clock monitoring exactly when they need to be off stage.

Nicks even joked about her gift of gab late in the performance.

"There's too many stories in my life," she said, before laughingly considering what her concerts might morph into another five or six years down the road. "Pretty soon, there won't be any music. It'll just be me sitting in a chair talking. It will be the cheapest show ever. I won't even need a band."

As bands do go, Nicks has always managed to surround herself with some amazing musicians, whether on stage or in the studio, a fact that was never more evident than it was Saturday night -- both in terms of live performance and with her revelations into each song's background. This has been true since she broke into music as a duo with partner/guitarist Lindsey Buckingham, continued on with that pair's tenure in Fleetwood Mac, and been a constant throughout her solo career as well. Some of her best stories revolved impromptu recording sessions with Tom Petty's Heartbreakers and Prince, among others.

Both Prince and Tom Petty had notable influences in Saturday's set. Nicks told of how she wrote one of her biggest hits, "Stand Back," on her lone wedding day, literally working through her honeymoon night on it, after hearing Prince's "Little Red Corvette" on the radio for the first time. Recognizing Prince's influence on the song, she later rang him up from Sunset Sound studios in Los Angeles to seek his permission to finish the track. He happened to be in town and showed up at the studio 15 minutes later, as Nicks said, "Dressed to the 9's in purple," to hear what they'd recorded.

"If you hate this, it's over, we will throw it in the trash right now,' " Nicks said she told Prince. "(But) he loved it. I said, 'Would you like to play on it?' And he said yes."

In true rock star fashion, Prince had brought a guitar with him in his car. He added some guitar and keyboards to the final track.

"He, like, finished in an hour," Nicks said. "(He said), 'I love it. Be seeing you.'

"Now when I sing it, he's right here," Nicks said, motioning just to her side on stage.

Nicks' collaboration with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers is more obvious, since the band literally helped catapult her solo career with the duet "Stop Draggin' My Heart Around" in 1981. Short of T.P. and the Heartbreakers personally showing up, it's hard to imagine a more spirited version of the tune being performed live than this tour's rendition. As she has been doing all tour, Chrissie Hynde, frontwoman of opening act The Pretenders, walked into the "Stop Draggin' " party like she was walking onto a yacht, strolling confidently out to thunderous applause during the first verse. There was so much genuine interaction between Nicks and Hynde, as well as guitarist Waddy Wachtel, that it was blatantly obvious how much fun everyone was having.

In the grand tradition of concert "walk-ons" -- where artists from other bands on the bill make a guest appearance in another's set -- the best ones tiptoe the tightrope between rehearsal and spontaneity. In this, "Stop Draggin' " was a huge early-set success. Although planned, it seemed to catch most of the crowd by surprise. Additionally, whether true or not, it appeared as if Nicks and Hynde almost decided on the fly who would take some of the lead vocal lines.

Nicks alluded to that after the song, saying that with so many singers -- five in this song, counting Wachtel and full-time backup singers Sharon Celani and Marilyn Martin -- it is hard to keep track of who, exactly, is supposed to sing what.

"You tried your hardest just to smooth it over," Nicks laughingly said to Wachtel after the song, "but you just couldn't do it."

Wachtel, who in addition to lead guitar duties is also the band's musical director, has been with Nicks from the start. He literally performed as a session musician on the "Buckingham Nicks" album in 1973 that led to duo's destined decision to join Fleetwood Mac the following year. Wachtel has played on every one of Nicks' solo albums and tours, and his performance -- not to mention his wild frizzy hair -- also figures prominently in the band's live show.

Nicks' latest album, "24 Karat Gold: Songs From the Vault," provided the perfect template for her strong storytime approach. The album features a collection of songs that Nicks wrote and recorded over the years that for some reason never quite fit musically or timing wise into any of her other projects. Over time she metaphorically placed them in her "gothic trunk of lost songs."

She played three songs from that album -- "Belle Fleur," "If You Were My Love" and "Starshine." The latter song, which Nicks co-wrote and recorded with Petty and the Heartbreakers (she thinks around 1979), certainly sounded like it could have been a vintage single for either of them, and helped drive home the sometimes fickle nature of the music industry.

"I wasn't doing a record (at the time) and he wasn't doing a record," Nicks said. "If either of us had been doing a record, it would have been on it. So it went into the gothic trunk of lost songs."

Nicks' set was extremely well paced in terms of song selection and running order. She could have filled the entire show with hit singles -- but to her credit, she didn't. She only played four Fleetwood Mac songs, and branched out into much of her lesser-known solo material as well. In less-capable hands this might have been a bit of a gamble, but it was no threat to a Rock and Roll Hall of Famer of Nicks' stature.

To be sure, Nicks did scatter hits occasionally throughout the show, before backloading it with four songs guaranteed to garner a great reaction. An especially intense 10-minute version of "Gold Dust Woman" set the beginning of the end in motion. That was followed by the main set-closing "Edge of Seventeen." The encore featured "Rhiannon" and "Landslide," two songs from her Fleetwood Mac debut. Nicks noted that she has sang both those songs every single performance since they were written.

"I wrote this song in Aspen," she said of "Landslide." "I wish I'd written it here."

Nicks owned the crowd from the moment she walked on stage in her trademark platform heel boots, flowing black dress, black fingerless gloves and an ever-changing array of scarves, shawls, jackets and capes.

One such cape, by the way, was the silk chiffon one she wore on the "Bella Donna" album cover. The cape, she said, cost her $2,000 in 1981 and remains in perfect condition today. She laughed considering what her mother would have said at paying that initial exorbitant price tag.

"(But) $2,000 over 35 years is a very good price," Nicks noted.

That's very likely the sentiment anyone in attendance Saturday night will have years from now when they look at the price on their ticket stub. Seeing someone of Nicks' legend, caliber and overall talent, still performing at a very high level, is not an opportunity to be missed. You simply can't put a cost on gathering memories like that -- or missing out on them.

Adding to the value of the night's entertainment, The Pretenders, also a R&R Hall of Fame act, performed a tight 15-song, one-hour set. The band showcased both new and old material along with well-known hits "Back on the Chain Gang," "My City Was Gone," "Middle of the Road" and "Brass in Pocket."

Pretenders frontwoman Hynde runs the show, naturally, along with the animated efforts of lead guitarist James Walbourne, original drummer Martin Chambers, and the more laid-back efforts of bassist Nick Wilkinson and keyboardist Ricky Peterson. Peterson deserves special notice for pulling double duty, as he also is a member of Nicks' touring band.

In one sense, Nicks and Hynde are polar opposites. Hynde, rocking her signature fringe mop hairdo, hit the stage in skinny jeans, a T-shirt and a short-waisted pink tuxedo jacket, which she removed six songs in. But in another sense, Nicks and Hynde are kindred spirits who can rock with the best of them. As unlikely as it sounds, there are fewer sights more pure rock and roll than seeing the statuesque Hynde, bent at a three-quarters side angle, jamming on a harmonica with her Fender Telecaster slung behind her back during the end of "Middle of the Road." Perhaps you had to be there.

On any other night, The Pretenders would have been the talk of the town. In this tour, however, Nicks gets the final word.



More photos here: http://www.heraldextra.com/entertain...medium=twitter
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Old 02-26-2017, 02:56 PM
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Concert review: Stevie Nicks’ “gothic trunk of lost songs” filled with magic moments

"She was magical. Make sure you put that in your write-up," my wife insisted upon leaving Saturday's Stevie Nicks concert at Vivint SmartHome Arena in Salt Lake City.

She had a point. How else to explain an artist I had no particular affinity for prior to entering the building delivering two and a quarter hours of the best concert-going experience of my adulthood?

Magic seems as good an explanation as any.

OK, so you could argue that many of the live performances — bolstered by two guitarists, a bassist, drummer, Hammond organist, grand pianist, two female backing vocalists, and the occasional Nicks-shaken tambourine — were infused with a depth and energy that isn't always apparent (to me, anyway) on her recordings.

That hardly tells the whole story, though Nicks proved quite adept at just that, often preceding or following the tunes that comprised the night's setlist — many pulled from her "gothic trunk of lost songs" — with meandering, colorful and humorous tales.

Among her topics of conversation:

• Her two-plus years growing up in Utah: "My parents threatened to send me to that Catholic [high] school downtown if I didn't get a B-plus average [at Wasatch Junior High]. … That place turned out to be a lot fun! It was coed! I didn't brag about it 'cause I knew they'd whip me out of that school and put me in a convent."

• Her humble pre-Fleetwood Mac career: "I was still a waitress and a cleaning lady, and I had a Toyota Corolla with no reverse. And all of a sudden I'm flying first class and riding in a limousine — something I never thought I'd do unless I was the one driving it."

• Her expensive-yet-theoretically-practical fashion proclivities: "This is the original 'Bella Donna' cape. My mother, if she were standing here, would fall over if she knew how much it cost. It was $2,000! It's made of silk chiffon! … But look at it — not even a loose thread anywhere. So, you take $2,000 and spread it over 30-something years … now, all of a sudden, if my mother was standing here today, she would say, 'That was a very good choice of fabric!' "

Nicks also spun yarns of having to promise not to break up Fleetwood Mac in order to make her first solo record (but giving her label a panic attack by quasi-joking that what she really wanted to do was join Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers), having nothing to do one night in Brisbane, Australia, and winding up "thoroughly and completely in love with the love story of Bella and Edward" after getting sucked into the first two "Twilight" films, and meeting a young Prince sometime between 1975-77 "when hardly anyone knew who he was" and remarking to him, "You don't say much do you? You need to talk a little more."

Of course, Nicks also has a way with words in her songs, and she proved equally enchanting there over the course of her 18-tune setlist, which included four selections apiece from Fleetwood, 1981's "Bella Donna" and 1983's "The Wild Heart," three from the 2014 rarities collection "24 Karat Gold," two from 2011's "In Your Dreams," and even one from her original "Buckingham Nicks" album from 1973.

She got the crowd rolling early by having The Pretenders' Chrissie Hynde trade lines with her on her Petty duet "Stop Draggin' My Heart Around" (with guitarist Waddy Wachtel taking on Petty's parts). Other highlights included the ethereal, "Twilight"-inspired "Moonlight (A Vampire's Dream)," the unexpected electro rave-up "Stand Back" (an offshoot of Prince's "Little Red Corvette"), and the main-set closer "Edge of Seventeen," which had the audience dancing and singing along on all those "Whooooo! Whooooo! Whooooo!"s.

Really, though, just about everyone's favorite moments came in her Fleetwood performances. "Gypsy" got the crowd swaying, and the encore included "Rhiannon" and a sparse acoustic guitar and piano arrangement of "Landslide," but perhaps the singular moment of the entire evening was the hypnotic-and-transfixing-yet-swaggering run through "Gold Dust Woman."

Hynde and The Pretenders opened the night with a no-frills hour of straight-ahead rock, starting off a bit flat before settling in and catching a groove around their fourth song in. Her mid-set trifecta of "Back on the Chain Gang," "I'll Stand By You" and "Don't Get Me Wrong" would've been her inarguable highlight if not for her rousing, set-closing edition of "Brass in Pocket."

When The Pretenders wrapped up, Hynde told those assembled, "Stevie will be on in about 20 minutes. Don't go anywhere!"

Great advice — unless, of course, you'd simply already had too many magical moments in your life.



http://www.sltrib.com/entertainment/...s-gothic-trunk
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Old 02-26-2017, 03:05 PM
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Updated videos on Youtube:

Intro



Gold & Braid



Stop Draggin' My Heart Around



Gypsy







Enchanted



New Orleans







Starshine



Stand Back (story & performance)









Gold Dust Woman





Rhiannon



Landslide


Last edited by SisterNightroad; 03-07-2017 at 08:12 AM..
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Old 02-27-2017, 06:08 AM
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Stevie Nicks – Concert Review


[SALT LAKE CITY, UT.] The energy I felt walking into the Vivint Smart Home Arena tonight with thousands of other Stevie Nicks supporters made everything surreal. It was like we all had to remind ourselves that yes, this is really happening. A legend, an icon, a gypsy goddess and who -so many call- the “Queen of Rock n’ Roll” was about to touch our souls. At tonight’s show she invited the audience to take a glimpse into her music with untold stories about her time spent living in Salt Lake City, Utah to how ‘Little Red Corvette’ by Prince is what inspired her to write one of her most popular songs ‘Stand Back’. A fact I’m sure many of us hadn’t known until that moment and it felt like privileged information.

Time Length.: 1 hour 59 mins Set Start.: 8:45pm

Special appreciate to Kylie for granting StyleHeirs.com press access to the 24 Karat Gold Tour by the majestic performer Stevie Nicks. Many of her fans were introduced to new unreleased material that she pulled from the archives or how she explained it “went into the gothic trunk of lost songs.” It was nice to witness her performance live and be able to report that she still has the unique voice that separates her from so many artists that have come prior to her career and those that are currently in the music scene. The energy was addicting tonight and what I noticed is how much more engaged the crowd was with her popular tracks like ‘Edge of Seventeen’, ‘Rhiannon’ and ‘Landslide’ in comparison to that of her newly brought-to-light songs. Tonight wasn’t a show that presented her greatest hits as a blast-from-the-past that the audience desperately craved yet it was more of a performance that allowed her to showcase another side to her creativity in music.

Being that Stevie Nicks began her career back in the 70’s and now [many years later] her name still continues to be a house-hold brand in the music industry. On top of that, it was a little disappointing that Nicks wouldn’t allow tighter images to be taken by the press. Albeit, I understand her wishes yet it only proves how aging in American culture isn’t embraced as accomplishments rather as a negative unwanted passage in our life no one can escape from. As a legend from four decades ago and myself as a millennial, I had so many unanswered questions that has now turned into a lost opportunity for Nicks to militate against depression and give an influence to a fresher generation in music.

Back in 2014, Nicks started her 24 Karat Gold project and surprisingly enough was able to execute the album into completion after two full weeks. Which her and the Fleetwood Mac members weren’t accustom to doing – sprinting through their recording sessions so efficiently yet, so quickly. Out of all the new songs performed tonight the one I took to the most would be ‘Starshine’ because it felt like an original hit, it felt nostalgic. This album was a testament to never settle and to always achieve your dreams or you’ll spend years living with regret and doubt of what could have been. The song I completely looked forward to was ‘Bella Donna’ only because that song remains as a nice reminder that Stevie Nicks actualized a successful solo career when many naysayers doubted her single-handed magical talent.

www.stevienicksofficial.com

Purchase her 24 Karat Gold Album and escape into a mystical fantasy filled with happiness!

Inherit Love, I AM,
#StyleHeirs.








http://www.styleheirs.com/stevie-nicks-concert-review/
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Old 02-28-2017, 08:26 AM
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REVIEW: STEVIE NICKS AND THE PRETENDERS AT THE VIV


When Chrissie Hynde and the Pretenders are the opening act, you know you’re in for a heck of a show—and that’s exactly what the nearly sold-out crowd at Vivint Arena got on Saturday night.

The hard-rocking Hynde & co. spent most of her hour-long set with a guitar in hand, playing a selection of new songs and Pretenders classics. It’s notable that one unfamiliar with the band could probably not tell their new stuff from the old—all are infused with that Pretenders sound formula of heavy bass, catchy hook. And speaking of Trademark, it was clear that Hynde’s vocal range is as good as it’s ever been as she stood on the stage moving in that aggressive, come-at-me-bro Chrissy Hynde way—wide stance, feet slightly pigeon toed, head cocked and arms out. There’s no doubt that she’s as hot as she’s ever been.

And—the woman who, 30 years ago, bemoaned the Ohio landscape becoming strip malls in “My City is Gone” had some things to say about Salt Lake’s urban planning. A passionate defender of animal rights, vegetarian, Hynde told the arena that she dined at Zest, downtown’s vegan bar and went to a movie during her day in Salt Lake. Then she said, “Salt Lake City, I must say, is on the up,” the crowd cheered. “More vegetarian food, more cool little places,” she explained, “And I bought a Stella McCartney jacket—so I’m happy!”

By the end of her set, Hynde and her band played all of the Pretenders best-known songs, closing with a booming, energetic “Brass in Pocket,” earning them a well-deserved standing ovation.

About 20 minutes later, Stevie Nicks came on the stage looking just like you’d expect her to look—in black head to toe, with high heeled boots a asymmetrically hemmed dress and, of course, fingerless gloves. She carried a tambourine adorned with long ribbons in the crook of her arm that she used intermittently through the night.

Right after her first song, “Golden Braid” she addressed the elephant in the room. “I actually lived here, and I loved it!” she told the crowd, who surely already knew that Nicks, who moved around often as a child, attended junior high in Salt Lake. And she mentioned twice during the show that her best friend from that period was at the show.

The point of this tour was to pull out what Nicks called “New old songs,” from her “gothic trunk of lost songs” and so nicks spent most of the night as a storyteller, walking the crowd through stories of her times with Fleetwood Mac (“I was still a waitress and a cleaning lady, and I had a Toyota Corolla with no reverse. And all of a sudden I’m flying first class and riding in a limousine—I never thought I’d do unless I was the one driving it.”), as a solo artist (including that time Prince came by to record a song he’d just learned she’d written based on his song “Little Red Corvette”) and, believe it or not, the Twilight movies (saying that she was “thoroughly and completely in love with the love story of Bella and Edward”).

Three songs in, Hynde was back on stage for a rousingly fun rendition of the Nicks/Tom Petty classic “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around,” during which, Hynde had to point Nicks towards her mic when it was her turn to sing. “We have so much fun,” Nicks said after, “That we forget to sing our lines.”

After “Bella Donna” Nicks told the crowd that royal blue cape she’d quick-changed into was the original Bella Donna cape, as a photo of her wearing it when the song was first released showed on the screen behind her. “My mother, if she were standing here, would fall over if she knew how much it cost. It was $2,000, it’s made of silk chiffon!” she told the crowd. “But look at it. Not even a loose thread anywhere. So, you take $2,000 and spread it over 30-something years—now, all of a sudden, if my mother was standing here today, she would say, ‘That was a very good choice of fabric!’ ”

It was one of many capes she’d donned through the night—and no one wears a cape like Stevie Nicks.

After a jam-session-inspired “Gold Dust Woman” Nicks and her band came back onstage for a two-song encore, and she told the arena, “What a trip it is to come back here… I just might have to get a place up in the mountains. I feel really connected here, and that’s important.” The crowd roared.

Everyone loves a homecoming and a good story, and Salt Lake got both Saturday night.


—Photos by Stuart Graves




https://saltlakemagazine.com/review-...retenders-viv/
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Old 03-05-2017, 08:09 AM
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The Skinny: Stuff Stevie Nicks says

Stuff Stevie says: Stevie Nicks, one of the reigning queens of rock ‘n’ roll graced the Wasatch Front with her presence last weekend in an utterly beguiling performance.

While she was in great form, displaying a voice full of character — described perfectly in something I read online as “sandpaper on velvet” — Nicks was perhaps at her most engaging in the lengthy periods between songs. I’ve been to hundreds of concerts in my lifetime, but can’t remember any where there was as much between-song banter as what Nicks laid down.

And it was an absolutely great thing.

Nicks’ back stories to her songs weaved a tapestry as fine as that contained in her original “Bella Donna” cape, which she proudly displayed at one point of the show, remarking that it had cost her $2,000 in 1981.

Here were some of my favorite Stevie observations from the show:

— Nicks told of her family living in Salt Lake when she was in the eighth-, ninth- and part of her 10th-grade years in school. She related how her parents threatened that if she didn’t maintain a B average that they were going to put her in a Catholic school. Sure enough, that’s what happened. “But it backfired,” Nicks said, “because it was a really fun school. I didn’t tell them because I knew they would pull me out of Catholic school and put me right in a convent.”

— She reminisced about embarking on her first Fleetwood Mac tour and being picked up by a limousine. “I never thought that I would fly first class or ride in a limousine — unless I was a driver.”

— Nicks recalled meeting Prince at some point during her early Fleetwood Mac years, and noted how quiet he was. “I think I said to him, ‘You need to talk more!’ “

— Nicks talked about a promise she made before recording her first solo record, “Bella Donna, in 1981, which featured lead single “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around,” a duet with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. “When I first decided to do a solo album, I had to tell Fleetwood Mac that I was never going to break up the band,” Nicks said. “I don’t know if they believed me. But what I told the record company, I said I really wanted to be in Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.”

— Nicks discussed writing the well-known “Landslide” in Aspen, Colo. “(But) I wish I had written it here.” I believe her.

— Doug Fox



http://www.heraldextra.com/entertain...1b1304ebb.html
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