The Ledge

Go Back   The Ledge > Main Forums > Stevie Nicks
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read


Make the Ads Go Away! Click here.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-09-2016, 02:20 PM
SisterNightroad's Avatar
SisterNightroad SisterNightroad is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Italy
Posts: 5,208
Default Sacramento show

It’s not only rock ’n’ roll with Chrissie Hynde

Chrissie Hynde, famously born and raised in Akron, Ohio, formed the Pretenders in England in March 1978. The original band consisted of Hynde who wrote and sang most of the songs, lead guitarist James Honeyman-Scott, bassist Pete Farndon and drummer Martin Chambers.

The band’s seminal first album “Pretenders” was released in January 1980 and debuted at No. 1 on the UK Albums Chart. Including the songs “Precious,” “Stop Your Sobbing,” “Kid” and “Brass in Pocket,” the album is one of Rolling Stone’s “Greatest of All Time.” In October 2016 the Pretenders released “Alone” their first album in eight years.

Hynde and the Pretenders are on tour opening for Stevie Nicks, including a Tuesday, Dec. 13, show at the Golden 1 Center. She spoke with The Bee by phone.

Was the idea of forming a band always in your mind?

I wanted to be in a band from the time I was 16 - who didn’t? I grew up in the 60s. The stumbling block for me was that I was girl. I was very shy around guys. I wasn’t going to pull up to one of the jams they were having cause it was just uncomfortable. I kind of hung around. By the time I was 24 I thought, “Well the moment’s passed; I’m too old to do it now anyway” and then punk happened around 1976 in London. The definition of punk for me was that it was about non-discrimination, and that’s what everyone thought because it wasn’t if you could play or not. It was about a kind of attitude and what you had to say. I felt like I could slip through the net there, and it afforded me that opportunity.

Do you write about yourself or create characters for your songs?

I would like to be a storyteller and be able to talk about things, but I can’t write for other people. I don’t think I could write a song for someone else. I’m always getting it off my chest and expressing myself. So even though I think it’s kind of creepy, I would say my songs are strictly autobiographical.

Will you be singing any duets with Stevie in Sacramento?

I think we will. That’s good fun. To me it’s been the perfect tour. It’s been the most fun tour I’ve ever done to be honest. I never really liked the bigger venues. I like clubs and theaters, but these arenas for some reason feel more intimate than the theaters just cause of the way it’s set up. We’re right at the lip of the stage, and it feels really small, which is what turns me on.

It’s a Stevie Nicks audience, but some people like us as well and there might be some people who come see us. It’s been really fun, the Pretenders are in very very good form everyone’s playing at the height of their powers. Martin (Chambers) has been fantastic. It’s good and we’re digging it. You can’t always say that. When it feels like that you really appreciate it more and more as time goes on. You kind of throw it away in the early days because you don’t have anything to compare it to. When it’s gone, it’s gone. But now I know when it’s good.



Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/entertainment/...#storylink=cpy
Reply With Quote
.
  #2  
Old 12-09-2016, 04:15 PM
bombaysaffires bombaysaffires is offline
Addicted Ledgie
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: West Coast
Posts: 4,867
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SisterNightroad View Post
It’s not only rock ’n’ roll with Chrissie Hynde

Chrissie Hynde, famously born and raised in Akron, Ohio, formed the Pretenders in England in March 1978. The original band consisted of Hynde who wrote and sang most of the songs, lead guitarist James Honeyman-Scott, bassist Pete Farndon and drummer Martin Chambers.

The band’s seminal first album “Pretenders” was released in January 1980 and debuted at No. 1 on the UK Albums Chart. Including the songs “Precious,” “Stop Your Sobbing,” “Kid” and “Brass in Pocket,” the album is one of Rolling Stone’s “Greatest of All Time.” In October 2016 the Pretenders released “Alone” their first album in eight years.

Hynde and the Pretenders are on tour opening for Stevie Nicks, including a Tuesday, Dec. 13, show at the Golden 1 Center. She spoke with The Bee by phone.

Was the idea of forming a band always in your mind?

I wanted to be in a band from the time I was 16 - who didn’t? I grew up in the 60s. The stumbling block for me was that I was girl. I was very shy around guys. I wasn’t going to pull up to one of the jams they were having cause it was just uncomfortable. I kind of hung around. By the time I was 24 I thought, “Well the moment’s passed; I’m too old to do it now anyway” and then punk happened around 1976 in London. The definition of punk for me was that it was about non-discrimination, and that’s what everyone thought because it wasn’t if you could play or not. It was about a kind of attitude and what you had to say. I felt like I could slip through the net there, and it afforded me that opportunity.

Do you write about yourself or create characters for your songs?

I would like to be a storyteller and be able to talk about things, but I can’t write for other people. I don’t think I could write a song for someone else. I’m always getting it off my chest and expressing myself. So even though I think it’s kind of creepy, I would say my songs are strictly autobiographical.

Will you be singing any duets with Stevie in Sacramento?

I think we will. That’s good fun. To me it’s been the perfect tour. It’s been the most fun tour I’ve ever done to be honest. I never really liked the bigger venues. I like clubs and theaters, but these arenas for some reason feel more intimate than the theaters just cause of the way it’s set up. We’re right at the lip of the stage, and it feels really small, which is what turns me on.

It’s a Stevie Nicks audience, but some people like us as well and there might be some people who come see us. It’s been really fun, the Pretenders are in very very good form everyone’s playing at the height of their powers. Martin (Chambers) has been fantastic. It’s good and we’re digging it. You can’t always say that. When it feels like that you really appreciate it more and more as time goes on. You kind of throw it away in the early days because you don’t have anything to compare it to. When it’s gone, it’s gone. But now I know when it’s good.



Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/entertainment/...#storylink=cpy

this is great to read and i hope it's mostly true.... I always take these kinds of comments with a grain of salt because the goal is to make the tour successful and sell tickets and no one wants to go to a show where one of the acts says how crappy a time they're having. So I recognize that she's being a good soldier and selling the tour. It'll be curious to see what gets said when the tour is done.....whether she says she never wants to do big arenas again, or it reminded her why she doesn't like arenas or whatever. Hopefully it's all going well, but Chrissy is kind of in the position on this tour that Stevie was on the Rod Stewart tour... I'm willing to bet Stevie told her mgmt she'll only do these partnering tours if she gets to be the top billing based on her Rod experience (and I'm not blaming her). But I do hope she and Chrissy are at least getting on well.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-09-2016, 06:53 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
Addicted Ledgie
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: California
Posts: 25,047
Default

Real gold Stevie Nicks 24 Karat Gold Tour

By Deena Drewis, Sacramento News & Review
deenad@newsreview.com

https://www.newsreview.com/sacrament...t?oid=22939396

Unearth your best fringe, leather and lace, belladonnas: The high priestess of rock ’n’ roll is on her way. After a long bout of touring with Fleetwood Mac, the powerhouse is striking out on her own. As Nicks told The New York Times when the tour was announced earlier this year: “I am the boss. My solo career is probably the reason Fleetwood Mac is still together in 2016, because I was always happy to leave Fleetwood Mac, and I was always happy to come back, too.”

This stop is part of the 24 Karat Gold Tour in support of her eighth solo album by the same name. Released in 2014, the album features songs written as far back as 1969 and a cover of a Vanessa Carlton song (random, yes, but it was a favorite of Nicks’ late mother).

For the faithful, it’s worth noting that Nicks may need you now more than ever; a vocal Hillary Clinton supporter, she had previously joked about calling up the Dixie Chicks and Billy Corgan for a rousing, in-your-face rendition of “Landslide” after Hilz defeated Trump. Sigh.

On a brighter note: Opening up on the 24 Karat Gold Tour is none other than the Pretenders, yet another legendary rock band fronted by a badass frontwoman. In other words, this is a potentially world-altering occasion for the young lady in your life who might only know the opening notes of “Edge of Seventeen” as the opening notes of “Bootylicious” by Destiny’s Child. 7 p.m., Tuesday, December 13. $16.25-$146.50. Golden 1 Center, 500 David J. Stern Walk.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-15-2016, 05:08 PM
sywlindseyfan's Avatar
sywlindseyfan sywlindseyfan is offline
Addicted Ledgie
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 446
Default

It was amazing! A fantastic show and I am so proud of Stevie and her new endeavor. Her ability to fill a whole arena on her own is remarkable. I am still not 100% with her and her FM decision that she has recently made, but I thoroughly enjoyed this show and setlist. Did anybody else get a chance to go to the Sacramento show?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-16-2016, 06:57 AM
SisterNightroad's Avatar
SisterNightroad SisterNightroad is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Italy
Posts: 5,208
Default

Stevie Nicks and the Pretenders: rock 'n' roll's leading ladies at Golden 1 Center


Two of rock ‘n’ roll’s longtime leading ladies held court at the Golden 1 Center earlier this week. Stevie Nicks of Fleetwood Mac fame and Chrissie Hynde of the Pretenders put on an epic rock show that showcased the enduring uniqueness of each of these women as songwriters and performers.

Midway through the raucous opening set by the Pretenders, Hynde paused and showed love to the locals when she said that she really enjoyed the “pretty view of all the trees outside [her] hotel window.

It reminds me of a place I grew up in the ‘50s,” she continued. With that, she and the band dramatically bounced into the familiar bass groove of the band’s iconic “My City was Gone.”

Naturally, the crowd knew the words to that song’s familiar refrain (“Ay, oh, way to go Ohio”), as well as the majority of the songs the band played. In fact, the audience, who mostly ranged in age from 45-75, seemed to have the majority of the Pretenders setlist embedded in their DNA. This is not ironic since most of the band’s biggest hits came out during the Reagan years, yet have more than endured the test of time with their wry socio-political-environmental bent that could easily be applied to the times we are about to enter.

Hynde, who turned 65 in September, reminded everyone why she has long been known as a badass as she strutted the stage with attitude and defiance. She blasted a group of cell phone wielding fans early in the show for ignoring her request for no video. When they put down their devices, some hard, punk-style dancing erupted on the floor as drummer Martin Chambers pounded out some hard-hitting beats.

While Hynde preferred to let her music do the talking, Nicks took a storyteller’s approach during her lengthy set. Among the many interesting anecdotes the 68-year-old told was a story about hearing Prince’s “Little Red Corvette” for the first time while driving down the highway as a newlywed. It inspired her to write the song “Stand Back” that same day. Later, when she called the Purple One to ask if he wanted to hear it, he came down to the studio and ended up playing an uncredited synth part that is essentially the catchy glue that propels the song.

Later, during “Edge of Seventeen,” images of Prince were shown on the backdrop. Nicks, 69, also had interesting tales about writing “Gold Dust Woman” as a teen in Arizona and also had a few about collaborating with Tom Petty. But perhaps her most amazing accomplishment that night was being able to twirl and do her signature scarf dance while wearing high heeled boots.

Hynde returned during Nicks’ set for the Petty-penned tune “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around,” a fitting moment as the pair belted out the tune side by side and further cemented their place as two perpetual paragons of rock ‘n’ roll in a year when many of the great ones of their era have fallen.



https://www.newsreview.com/sacrament...t?oid=23034991
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-16-2016, 10:33 AM
SisterNightroad's Avatar
SisterNightroad SisterNightroad is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Italy
Posts: 5,208
Default

Chrissie Hynde discusses the inevitable end of rock ’n’ roll

Chrissie Hynde, famously born and raised in Akron, Ohio, formed the Pretenders in England in March 1978. The original band consisted of Hynde, who wrote and sang most of the songs, lead guitarist James Honeyman-Scott, bassist Pete Farndon and drummer Martin Chambers.

The band’s seminal first album “Pretenders” was released in January 1980 and debuted at No. 1 on the UK Albums Chart. Including the songs “Precious,” “Stop Your Sobbing,” “Kid” and “Brass in Pocket,” the album is one of Rolling Stone’s “Greatest of All Time.”

Scott and Farndon both suffered drug-related deaths in 1982, but the group has persevered. Hynde’s distinctive voice, writing and tough-minded attitude have made her an influential presence in rock music and one of the most important women of all time in rock music. The Pretenders were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2005.

Hynde published a memoir “Reckless: My Life as a Pretender” in 2015 (Doubleday, $27, 336 pages), and in October the Pretenders released “Alone,” their first album in eight years.

She talked with The Bee before the Pretenders’ Dec. 13 appearance at the Golden 1 Center where the group opened for Stevie Nicks.

Q. I read you said one of the motivations to write the memoir was to make sure your original band mates got the credit they deserve.

A. We certainly had enough attention at the time. The band was very well received, but because they died young, I think it was matter of paying tribute to them a little bit; that was all.

Q. Did you downplay their deaths at the time as a matter of self-survival?

A. I don’t think that I downplayed it, but I’m not really into sensationalizing my personal details. … When they died I didn’t make a big stink of it in the press, and I just tried to let them have their dignity. I don’t really participate in this confessional public therapy mode. The only thing I really offer the public is the music. … My message has been “Don’t kill and eat animals” for the last 45 years. It really is a whole message with environmental awareness. … Other than that, really nothing about me is on offer to the public. I don’t participate in celebrity culture, I never have.

Q. Was it difficult to write a book about yourself – not wanting to exploit yourself?

A. No, it was kind of fun really. I went about it kind of like I was making a record. I wanted it to be a real easy read. I kept it light; I didn’t get into any dark s---. It wasn’t a kiss-and-tell; I just told what I had to, to move the story along. Somehow I managed to not really say anything bad about anyone; I could’ve. It was the light version of my story. I think writing it was more of a way of turning the page on the past and moving forward. That’s something anyone wants to do at a certain point, and if you’re in a public capacity, you get more of any opportunity to do that unless you’re just a … great writer, which I’m not. I just had a story to tell, and I got away with it because I’m not really a writer.

I just wanted to get out of my system and also over the years I’ve been asked a lot of questions and that gets kind of tedious so I thought if I spill this I won’t have to talk about it anymore, which obviously hasn’t worked.

Q. The idea of mortality seems very present with us now. Do you think about it much?

A. I call this time we’re in now “the-end-of-an-era era.” We grew up with rock-and-roll that started in the ’50s, it really came into its own in the ’60s, and that was the most fertile time when it all exploded. Then it got derailed with all the drugs and then it limped along. And then there was a lot of money in it, and that changed everything and everyone got excited again and kept doing it even though it was s---. It certainly has gone through some different cycles.

The inevitable cycle – if something’s been around for 50 years – is death. It’s inevitable and certainly if you look at the great jazz musicians, there’s always this quest to discover why we’re here. That’s what anyone in any of the arts is trying to figure out, any human being is trying to figure out if they’re conscious. That doesn’t end.

The challenging aspect of that is that we’re not going to be here. We’re going to die. Our mortality has to be an inevitability and a predominant theme of any form of the arts because everything’s temporary, and that’s something we have to try to understand. To not think about that would be churlish, I think. It’s a hell of denial if you’re not thinking about it. I don’t find it depressing; I think it’s fascinating.



Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/entertainment/...#storylink=cpy
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-16-2016, 07:32 PM
Phil's Avatar
Phil Phil is offline
Addicted Ledgie
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Australia
Posts: 863
Default

Chrissie is so much more dignified than some others we know...
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12-18-2016, 04:40 PM
SisterNightroad's Avatar
SisterNightroad SisterNightroad is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Italy
Posts: 5,208
Default

Stevie Nicks, The Pretenders and new arena shine in Sacramento


The stellar concert pairing of Stevie Nicks along with Chrissie Hynde and The Pretenders made it’s way to the new Golden 1 Center in Sacramento Tuesday night for a long evening of hits from the Rock and Roll Hall of Famers. Nicks, the Fleetwood Mac front woman with a cult like following, is touring in support of 2014’s “24 Karat Gold: Songs From The Vault,” an excellent compilation of updated demos and other previously unreleased material from her archives stretching all the way back to 1969.

Just over two months old, the Golden 1 Center makes a strong first impression as Northern California’s newest major entertainment venue. Full time home of the NBA’s Sacramento Kings, the arena can hold up to 19,000 fans for concerts and offered superb acoustics from a variety of different locations.

Nicks told the crowd early on “It’s not gonna be the same show that you’re used to seeing.” The setlist wasn’t a problem, it was wonderful, but Nicks penchant for consistently derailing any momentum provided by her endless reservoir of quality material by punctuating nearly every song with a long-winded and rehearsed backstory about its genesis was.

Musings included, her appearance lasted a generous 2 1/4 hours. But an incalculable amount of time was wasted by a number of trivial anecdotes that both contributed to killing the energy level of what could have been a celebration while also seemingly leading to many departing long before the encore was even approaching. Stories of collaborations with Prince and her long time desire to join the Heartbreakers were among those that were precious, but Nicks excessively chatty tales left many in the audience cringing.

Mixing a pleasing blend of both old and newer solo material with four Mac tunes and the rarely heard Buckingham Nicks composition “Crying In The Night”, the near sellout crowd received a pleasant early jolt when Hynde came out for a potent duet of “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around.” Dressed in her trademark flowing black dress with platform heels and clutching a tambourine thru most of the evening, Nicks voice remains powerful.

Supported by a tight six piece band featuring long time guitarist and musical director Waddy Wachtel in addition to two back up singers, images from younger days that flashed on the HD monitor above the stage capturing moments with Prince and Petty along with her fellow members of Mac were priceless.

Stating the importance of a strong follow-up to “Bella Donna”, her solo debut, Nicks recounted how she cold called Prince for the first time after learning that they were both in Los Angeles during the summer of 1981 to tell him about a song she was working on as a response to the melody of the Purple One’s “Little Red Corvette.” The resulting “Stand Back” was the lead single from her sophomore effort “The Wild Heart” and Nicks legacy as a solo artist was solidified.

The cowbell led intro to the “Rumours” finale “Gold Dust Woman” signaled the beginning of the end, but what an ending it was. The strobe splashed “Edge of Seventeen” followed before the band retreated backstage for a brief encore. Returning to a joyous ovation, Nicks and Company wrapped up an outstanding overview of her musical journey by launching into “Rhiannon” before closing with “Landslide.”

Not your average opening act, The Pretenders 80 minute set was a treat that showed that they too are headliner material. Having seen Chrissie Hynde perform two years ago after releasing her own critically acclaimed solo album “Stockholm,” it didn’t take long to be reminded of the Ohio native’s own place in music history and contribution to female empowerment.

After opening with two cuts from the recently released “Alone,” the band quickly returned to more familiar territory for most by commencing to dust off early nuggets such as “Message of Love” and “Private Life” before the distinct opening chords of “Back on the Chain Gang” brought many to their feet. Still seemingly a song of desperation as relevant today as when it was released in 1984, “My City Was Gone,” one of three dazzling cuts from “Learning to Crawl” served as an intro to their catchy latest single “Holy Commotion,” written about religious tolerance.

From there it was an onslaught of unmistakable songs that easily demonstrated why the girl from Akron, joined by fellow founding member and drummer Martin Chambers, was able to to make what would have been a mere 40 mile drive to Cleveland for her induction to the Rock Hall in 2005. Finishing with a salvo of The Kinks “Stop Your Sobbing,” “Don’t Get Me Wrong,” “Mystery Achievement,” and the rambunctious “Middle of the Road” before concluding with “Brass in Pocket,” it was hard to imagine them as anyone’s opening act.

The touring partners conclude a mournful year for the music world with shows in Las Vegas and the Forum in Inglewood this weekend before returning to the road in late February.




https://martineztribune.com/2016/12/14/6051/
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-18-2016, 09:03 PM
vivfox's Avatar
vivfox vivfox is offline
Addicted Ledgie
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 13,400
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SisterNightroad View Post
Nicks took a storyteller’s approach during her lengthy set. Among the many interesting anecdotes the 68-year-old told was a story about hearing Prince’s “Little Red Corvette” for the first time while driving down the highway as a newlywed. It inspired her to write the song “Stand Back” that same day. Later, when she called the Purple One to ask if he wanted to hear it, he came down to the studio and ended up playing an uncredited synth part that is essentially the catchy glue that propels the song.

Later, during “Edge of Seventeen,” images of Prince were shown on the backdrop. Nicks, 69, also had interesting tales about writing “Gold Dust Woman” as a teen in Arizona and also had a few about collaborating with Tom Petty. But perhaps her most amazing accomplishment that night was being able to twirl and do her signature scarf dance while wearing high heeled boots.
I enjoyed this review but was surprised their were no comments about how Stevie aged one year during this two hour and twenty minute show.
__________________
 photo d754aa6e-1605-473c-895b-9665a3f17371_zpsrtovtrei.jpg
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
© 1995-2003 Martin and Lisa Adelson, All Rights Reserved