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Old 02-05-2019, 09:22 AM
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Default Rock Hall 2019: 30 best albums from this year's class

I thought this was interesting. I won't list all 30 here just the 3 that they picked from Stevie. The link below has the full list.

30. Stevie Nicks – “Trouble in Shangri-La” (2001)
In an attempt to fit into the 21st century, Stevie Nicks hooked up with artists like Natalie Maines, Sarah McLachlan and Sheryl Crow. Those collaborations, for the most part, pay off well. “Trouble in Shangri-La” is a pop-rock album that reminded fans just how proficient of a songwriter Nicks was.

26. Stevie Nicks – “The Wild Heart” (1983)
Stevie Nicks became a huge solo star with her debut album, “Bella Donna.” Lead producer Jimmy Iovine wasn’t going to switch things up too much on the follow up. “The Wild Heart” is a solid pop-rock album that fits with the times and plays with just enough “new” sounds to keep things fresh.

17. Stevie Nicks – “Bella Donna” (1981)
You could make the case that none of Stevie Nicks’ solo albums are masterpieces. But there’s no denying how huge “Bella Donna” was. Armed with four hits that generated a ton of radio airplay, the album went multi-platinum and established Nicks as one of the biggest pop stars in the world.

https://www.cleveland.com/expo/life-...ars-class.html
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Old 02-05-2019, 10:32 AM
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thanks for posting the link. this year's list has some really impressive and influential acts. for people interested here's the whole article / list:

Rock Hall 2019: 30 best albums from this year's class
By Troy L. Smith, Cleveland.com | Posted February 05, 2019 at 05:25 AM | Updated February 05, 2019 at 06:06 AM

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- We've been ranking the best albums by the incoming Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Class for the past few years. By far, the Class of 2019 has the most impressive combined catalog.

Each artist released at least one album essential to their respective genre that also helped define the decade it was released.

In some cases -- Def Leppard, Janet Jackson, Radiohead, Stevie Nicks -- they were some of the biggest or most critically acclaimed releases of that era.

Others -- Roxy Music, The Zombies and The Cure -- feel even more influential in retrospect, given the current trends in alternative rock.

Any list like this is subjective (and this is just one person's opinion). But here are the 30 best albums by this year's Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Inductees.


30. Stevie Nicks – “Trouble in Shangri-La” (2001)
In an attempt to fit into the 21st century, Stevie Nicks hooked up with artists like Natalie Maines, Sarah McLachlan and Sheryl Crow. Those collaborations, for the most part, pay off well. “Trouble in Shangri-La” is a pop-rock album that reminded fans just how proficient of a songwriter Nicks was.

29. Def Leppard – “On Through the Night” (1980)
If anyone has a trouble identifying Def Leppard’s British heavy metal roots, look no further than the band’s promising debut album. Def Leppard wouldn’t truly become the Def Leppard mainstream fans know until the band hooked up with producer Mutt Lange. But the foundation of glam metal and huge hooks were there on “On Through the Night.”

28. The Cure – “Seventeen Seconds” (1980)
The Cure’s debut felt like more straightforward power-pop and pop-driven punk. But the band’s sophomore effort, “Seventeen Seconds,” sits in the darkness. It’s the first true indication of Robert Smith’s emotionally haunting vision, with lyrics about fear, doubts and insecurities. It’s not as gloomy (or quite as powerful) as an album like “Faith.” But “Seventeen Seconds” foreshadows everything great about The Cure in the 1980s.

27. Def Leppard – “High N’ Dry” (1981)
On “High N’ Dry,” Def Leppard hooked up with Mutt Lange and began crafting the loud, slickly produced rock that would make the band one of the biggest in the world. The big singles would come later. But Def Leppard was on a course towards greatness.

26. Stevie Nicks – “The Wild Heart” (1983)
Stevie Nicks became a huge solo star with her debut album, “Bella Donna.” Lead producer Jimmy Iovine wasn’t going to switch things up too much on the follow up. “The Wild Heart” is a solid pop-rock album that fits with the times and plays with just enough “new” sounds to keep things fresh.

25. Roxy Music – “Stranded” (1973)
There’s no denying Brian Eno is a genius. But Roxy Music didn’t really hit its groove until Eno left the band. That occurred on “Stranded,” which ditches a lot of the experimentation Eno brought to the table in favor of songs that truly rock.

25. Radiohead – “Amnesiac” (2001)
Featuring recordings made during the “Kid A” sessions, “Amnesiac” rode the wave of its predecessor to critical acclaim and praise centered on its elaborate experimentation. In retrospect, "Amnesiac" comes across as a lighter, slightly less impressive effort than its predecessor. That is fine, considering it's still quite daring compared to just about everything else that came out at the time.

23. The Cure – “Faith” (1981)
Believe it or not, “Faith” may be a bit dark even for diehard fans of The Cure. But that’s part of its brilliance. Robert Smith was one moody dude. But it’s Simon Gallup on bass that sets the tone. “Faith” is an album steeped in sadness. But there’s beauty within the gloom.

22. Janet Jackson – “janet.” (1993)
“Control” and “Rhythm Nation” made Janet Jackson a megastar heading into the 1990s. “janet.,” the album she released in 1993, isn’t quite as ambitious or stunning as its predecessors. But it shows a pop star reveling in super stardom on her biggest tracks yet. “That’s the Way Love Goes,” “You Want This” and “If” showcase an attitude even some of the biggest rock stars in the world couldn’t match.

21. Roxy Music – “Country Life” (1974)
“Country Life” is the sound of Roxy Music’s sound maturing and finding the optimal balance between art-rock ambitions and the livelier aspects of glam. Everything here glows with refinement with Bryan Ferry’s voice shining as much as ever.

20. Radiohead – “A Moon Shaped Pool” (2016)
“A Moon Shaped Pool” is one of the more shocking things Radiohead ever pulled off, considering few expected such an amazing album from the band in the year 2016. And Radiohead knew how to give the fans what they want, including the longtime favorite “True Love Waits” as a stunning closer.

19. The Cure – “Pornography” (1982)
“Pornography” was a huge leap forward for The Cure, even if the album wasn’t a huge hit. It’s just as dark as “Faith” but with more bite to it. The Cure would surpass it with albums that followed. But “Pornography” was a major piece of the puzzle for future masterpieces.

18. Roxy Music – “Siren” (1975)
“Siren” is a clear fan favorite in the Roxy Music catalog and one of the band’s best-known albums thanks in large part to the hit “Love Is the Drug.” As a whole, “Siren” finds Brian Ferry with a measured outlook, creating danceable pop music that doesn’t get bogged down with the high-art of some of the band’s other releases.

17. Stevie Nicks – “Bella Donna” (1981)
You could make the case that none of Stevie Nicks’ solo albums are masterpieces. But there’s no denying how huge “Bella Donna” was. Armed with four hits that generated a ton of radio airplay, the album went multi-platinum and established Nicks as one of the biggest pop stars in the world.

16. The Cure – “Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Kiss Me” (1987)
“Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Kiss Me” is all over the place, almost always for the better. Robert Smith and company don’t get bogged down in moodiness. In fact, the band doesn’t get locked into one style at all. For every moment of sadness, The Cure goes big with its sound as well, highlighted by the brilliant “Just Like Heaven.”

15. Roxy Music – “Roxy Music” (1972)
Roxy’s debut sounded like nothing else anyone was doing in rock at the time. The merger of Bryan Ferry’s glam and Brian Eno’s art-rock style felt like the Beatles had met Bowie. "Roxy Music" was a jaw-dropping debut that only feels more stunning as time goes on.

14. Radiohead – “In Rainbows” (2007)
“In Rainbows” mostly gets remembered for its groundbreaking pay-what-you-want release model. But what should never be forgotten is how amazing it is. Aside from, maybe, “The Bends,” “In Rainbows” is Radiohead’s easiest listen and most repeat-worthy album. It clocks in at just over 40 minutes, but features just as many thrilling moments as any Radiohead release this side of “OK Computer.”

13. Janet Jackson – “The Velvet Rope” (1997)

After battling depression, Jackson turned her emotional struggles into the most introspective album of her career. “The Velvet Rope” functions as a concept album that delves deeper and deeper in to Jackson’s soul with the most ambitious songs of her career, many driven by sexual themes. Musically, the album moves from bouncy pop (“Go Deep”) sensual R&B (“I Get Lonely”) to stunning hip-hop (“Got ‘til It’s Gone”). This is Jackson at both her most complex and interesting.

12. The Cure – “The Head on the Door” (1985)
It’s the album that made The Cure a big success and remains one of its most enduring (and endearing) bodies of work. And all it took was the band lightening up a bit. On the heels of some truly dark material, Robert Smith embraces pop music more than ever, leading to some of The Cure’s most iconic moments, like “Close to Me,” “Inbetween Days” and “Push.”

11. Def Leppard – “Pyromania” (1983)
Def Leppard released two masterful albums that sit at the very top of the glam-metal mountain. “Pyromania” was the first and, to some, still the best. Songs like “Photograph,” “Too Late for Love” and “Rock of Ages” were massive anthems, and radio couldn’t get enough of them. The idea that its over-produced is understandable. But Leppard couldn’t have cared less. They were popularizing British heavy metal in a way no one else had before.

10. Radiohead – “The Bends” (1995)
It feels crazy to say, but after being hailed as one of the most daring alternative rock experiences of the 1990s, “The Bends” feels underrated these days. Much of that has to do with what Radiohead accomplished in the two decades that followed. However, “The Bends” was every bit the building block for what came after. It marks the moment Radiohead moved from being just another good alternative-rock band and became the most influential act of its generation.

9. Roxy Music – “Avalon” (1982)
Roxy Music delivered quite the swan song with “Avalon,” one of the band’s best albums and easily its most commercial. By this point, Ferry and company had moved away from avant-garde territory to a sense of slick romanticism in songs that radiate with beauty.

8. Janet Jackson – “Control” (1986)
“Control” might as well be Janet Jackson’s debut album. After two failed attempts at making a name for herself, "Control" represented Janet's coming-out party, as a showcase of pop and R&B that proved to be one of the most influential albums of the 1980s. Jackson, along with the production team of Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, created a blend of funk, dance music, electronic sounds, hip hop and soul that by the 1990s that even Janet’s brother, Michael, was trying to emulate.

7. The Zombies – “Odessey and Oracle” (1968)
The Zombies have just one album on this list. But it’s a monster. Yet, "Odyssey and Oracle" wasn't always seen that way. The album was initially overlooked among the rush of British pop during the 1960s. In retrospect, The Zombies' classic stands as one of the most ambitious and elaborate of its time. “Time of the Season” helped the album finally get noticed. But true music fans will agree - this ranks among the best psychedelic albums ever made.

6. Def Leppard – “Hysteria” (1987)
Everything Def Leppard and producer Mutt Lange did on “Pyromania,” they did bigger and better on “Hysteria.” The sound has a preciseness to it you can't help marvel at. By this point, Def Leppard was in full glam metal mode and Joe Elliott’s lyrics played right into that excess. Leppard knew how to right songs that rocked both the stadium and the radio airwaves better than just about any act of the 1980s.

5. Janet Jackson – “Rhythm Nation 1814” (1989)
“Control” was the kind of album Janet Jackson could have copied for years to platinum-selling success. But its follow up, titled “Janet Jackson’s Rhythm Nation 1814,” showed Jackson was a true artist on the same level as the likes of Madonna, Bruce Springsteen and, yes, her brother Michael. Jackson (with Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis) wraps "Rhythm Nation" around social issues. But the pop music still feels larger than life in its catchy nature. This is one of the greatest and most complete collections of pop music ever released.

4. Radiohead – “Kid A” (2000)
Depending on your age, “Kid A” may be the best album of Radiohead’s career. Heck, it might even be the greatest album of the 21st century. It’s hard to believe the band could get more experimental than “OK Computer.” But “Kid A” further pushed the boundaries of pop music and set a new standard for Pitchfork-era bands that has yet to be topped.

3. Roxy Music – “For Your Pleasure” (1973)
Roxy Music’s masterpiece is a tug of war between the styles of Bryan Ferry and Brian Eno. At most points, they meet somewhere in the middle, pushing glam rock to more artful territory. The results are stunning. Other times, the styles push up against each other with the lengthier tracks approaching art-rock territory only to be pulled back before going over the top. It creates a exhilarating experience that Roxy Music would never quite achieve again due to Eno leaving the band.

2. The Cure – “Disintegration” (1989)
Not only is “Disintegration” the Cure’s creative masterpiece. It’s quite simply one of the greatest rock albums ever made. Not surprisingly, the album became a huge success on the strength of singles like “Love Song” and “Pictures of You.” But it’s the album emotionally devastating material that grounds it. This is gothic rock 101 and the foundation of emo music heading into the 1990s.

1. Radiohead – “OK Computer” (1997)
There are very few albums not by the Beatles that can make an argument for being the greatest of all time. “OK Computer” is one of them. You’d have to go back to the Fab Four’s creative peak to find an album as critically acclaimed as Radiohead’s 1997 masterpiece, which all but redefined alternative rock and pop music. "OK Computer" is a staggering achievement that looms larger as time goes on.
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Old 02-05-2019, 01:18 PM
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Probably her three best solo albums.
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Old 02-05-2019, 05:25 PM
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TISL sucks.
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Old 02-05-2019, 07:17 PM
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TISL sucks.
It does. They tried way too hard and ended up with a pale parody of Stevie for the most part.
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Old 02-06-2019, 12:18 AM
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I like the Sheryl-produced parts of TISL and wish she could have done the entire album. Love the title track, love Sorcerer, Candlebright, Fall From Grace... Love Is isn't as good at Beautiful Child but it ain't bad.
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Old 02-06-2019, 09:14 PM
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Except for maybe Bella Donna Stevie's albums all deserve their placings in the bottom half of this list. She is not getting in the RRHOF for her body of work as a solo artist.
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Old 02-06-2019, 09:40 PM
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I like the Sheryl-produced parts of TISL and wish she could have done the entire album. Love the title track, love Sorcerer, Candlebright, Fall From Grace... Love Is isn't as good at Beautiful Child but it ain't bad.
The title track is one of her most overlooked great songs.

My other favorites: Candlebright, Sorcerer, Planets Of The Universe, Bombay Sapphires, Fall From Grace, Love Is

Not crazy about the rest of the album, but that's enough.
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Old 02-07-2019, 11:15 AM
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Ahh I absolutely adore TISL. It's one of my favorites. The only song I skip is Too Far From Texas. I got to see 2 shows from that tour it was so freaking good. I pretty much love most everything Stevie puts out except for Street Angel. I would love for her to bring out Lana Del Rey for the RRHOF and sing Beautiful People Beautiful Problems even though I know there is zero chance of that happening. Tickets went on sale for the ceremony on Feb 1st and I was thinking of going but the tickets are way too expensive unless I sit up in peanut heaven. Still think it would be fun though.
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Old 02-08-2019, 03:19 AM
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The title track is one of her most overlooked great songs.

My other favorites: Candlebright, Sorcerer, Planets Of The Universe, Bombay Sapphires, Fall From Grace, Love Is

Not crazy about the rest of the album, but that's enough.
I agree the title track is a great song. There are a few other songs that are decent but most of the album is so meh IMHO. The songs seem to have a repetitive beat and sound which almost makes them sound like demos. No clever bridges or guitar solos either. Sheryl watered down the album so bad that its not listenable to my ears. I really like Love is and Bombay Sapphires. I like Planets but Stevie sounds so bored singing it which affects the song IMHO. Some of the worst Stevie songs ever recorded are on the album. Everyday, That made me stronger, and Its Only Love. All nails down a chalkboard for me

Street Angel is a better album IMHO. I like her voice, her writing, and the music blows away anything on TISL.
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Old 02-08-2019, 08:46 AM
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I agree the title track is a great song. There are a few other songs that are decent but most of the album is so meh IMHO. The songs seem to have a repetitive beat and sound which almost makes them sound like demos. No clever bridges or guitar solos either. Sheryl watered down the album so bad that its not listenable to my ears. I really like Love is and Bombay Sapphires. I like Planets but Stevie sounds so bored singing it which affects the song IMHO. Some of the worst Stevie songs ever recorded are on the album. Everyday, That made me stronger, and Its Only Love. All nails down a chalkboard for me

Street Angel is a better album IMHO. I like her voice, her writing, and the music blows away anything on TISL.
The album suffers from "dead vocal syndrome," in which Stevie sings in an even tone in a low register, likely due to her vocal coaching that started around the time of The Dance. It is obvious on Planets of the Universe especially, in which a fantastic song and a great arrangement are pulled down by Stevie groaning from her bootstraps. The singing register seems far too low. Later on Say You Will we get it too, especially on the title track. Sometimes clever arrangements help boost her, as in Destiny Rules or I Miss You. She does it again on later recordings too, see for example For What It's Worth or The Dealer.
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Old 02-08-2019, 11:13 AM
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So glad to see OK Computer at No 1 on this list. Also happy with the love for The Bends.
I think Bella Donna should be rated higher on this list.
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Old 02-08-2019, 03:18 PM
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The album suffers from "dead vocal syndrome," in which Stevie sings in an even tone in a low register, likely due to her vocal coaching that started around the time of The Dance. It is obvious on Planets of the Universe especially, in which a fantastic song and a great arrangement are pulled down by Stevie groaning from her bootstraps. The singing register seems far too low. Later on Say You Will we get it too, especially on the title track. Sometimes clever arrangements help boost her, as in Destiny Rules or I Miss You. She does it again on later recordings too, see for example For What It's Worth or The Dealer.
I agree with everything you said. I would prefer the klonopin vocals compared to TISL. But I would just add the music is very dull except for a few tracks. If you stripped all the vocals on the music the album would still be very dull. That's not the case on Street Angel and even OSOTM.
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Old 02-08-2019, 04:12 PM
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30. Stevie Nicks – “Trouble in Shangri-La” (2001)
26. Stevie Nicks – “The Wild Heart” (1983)
17. Stevie Nicks – “Bella Donna” (1981)
You could make the case that none of Stevie Nicks’ solo albums are masterpieces.
I've made that case many times—mostly to myself—and would continue to do so. But I agree with these three albums being more-or-less her essentials (although I love parts of In Your Dreams). They're certainly the three albums where Stevie's mystique was most assured and polished. They're the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame albums of her catalog. Let's hope she has another one at this level down the line to bookend her career, although between her advancing age and her resistance to recording full albums, the prospects aren't looking too good.
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Old 02-08-2019, 04:28 PM
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Not crazy about the rest of the album, but that's enough.
Give It's Only Love another listen. It's one of Stevie's career-capping studio vocal performances. She finds the Sixties folk-femme groove—listen to Dionne Warwick's Anyone Who Ever Had a Heart, Nico's These Days, or Emmylou Harris & Gram Parsons on Love Hurts from Grievous Angel.
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