The Ledge

Go Back   The Ledge > Main Forums > Stevie Nicks
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read


Make the Ads Go Away! Click here.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-14-2018, 12:12 PM
kak125's Avatar
kak125 kak125 is offline
Addicted Ledgie
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 1,824
Default Rock Hall nominee Stevie Nicks empowers through her songs

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- The story goes, on a hot summer day in 1970, Janis Joplin shouted off the opening band when its set ran long. Stevie Nicks, that band's diminutive singer would later comment,"Being yelled off the stage by Janis Joplin was one of the greatest honors of my life."

Both women would go on to beat the rock odds and be inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, just 14 percent women. When this year's inductees are announced in December, Nicks could become the first woman to be inducted into the Hall twice -- once as a member of Fleetwood Mac, and once as a solo artist.

See all 15 2018 Rock Hall nominees here.

Joplin and Nicks' stage personas, so indelible, were built on opposite characteristics. On stage Joplin swaggered, overpowered. Along with her aversion to sharing a stage, she rarely shared a microphone. Her string of backup bands was an interchangeable not-as-important. It was always Janis Joplin and a forgettable else.

Nicks found fame in the five-member Fleetwood Mac, whose soap opera backstories became the stuff of rock legend. On stage, she twirled and harmonized. Her songs about gypsies and witches shared space with songs by her guitar-picking ex-lover Lindsey Buckingham, who was also her songs' arranger. At concerts she became ethereal, the feminine yin to his masculine yang.

ritics responded in an odd sort of way. Nicks penned "Dreams," the band's only No. 1 hit, as well as half of Rolling Stone's selections for Fleetwood Mac's top 14 songs and seven of the ten fan-favorites in a Rolling Stone poll. Yet Nicks was routinely critically dismissed as a "ditz," a "bimbo," and a "mooncalf" -- while Buckingham was hailed as the band's creative genius.

Which begs the question: Why was it either/or?

Commenting on critics' tendencies to overvalue Buckingham while dismissing Nicks, writer Amy Mulvihill suggested, "I wish these people would actually listen to her songs."

Early Nicks' lyrics gave a twist to a familiar subject -- the demise of a relationship. In Nicks' songs there is no crying at a party, offering another piece of her heart, or worrying that you'll love her tomorrow.

Instead, she offers new options, from the flippant, "Well who am I to bring you down?" to the caustic, "Rulers make bad lovers, better put your kingdom up for sale."

She ruminates, but it never leads to despair. It's just a learning moment, an important step on the road to something else. It was an empowering shift of perspective, done with the lift of a shawl by a perfectly manicured hand.

Stevie took traditionally feminine characteristics, unabashedly embraced them, and then made them the source of power," songwriter and singer Vanessa Carlton commented.

It's probably no surprise her life mirrors the lyrics. Still performing at 70, her picked-apart love affairs, critic dismissals, addictions and weight ups and downs, never stopped a career that now spans almost 50 years, and includes eight Grammy nominations for her solo work, 28 years of a reverential fan-fest called, "The Night of a Thousand Stevies," and a continued relevance best expressed in a 2014 millennial TED talk that advised a new generation of fans to "just be Stevie."

There is a temptation to call it ironic -- the fact that this diminutive woman draped in shawls and lace could end up so triumphant -- but ironic would embarrassingly miss the point.

Just listen to her songs.

https://www.cleveland.com/metro/inde...vie_nicks.html
Reply With Quote
.
  #2  
Old 11-14-2018, 01:05 PM
David's Avatar
David David is offline
Addicted Ledgie
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: California
Posts: 13,548
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kak125 View Post
She ruminates, but it never leads to despair.
After Tusk, Stevie repeatedly creates stories of grand passions and deep despair. The thing is, sometimes the melodramatic sweep of the passions engages me—as in the kinetic, Keatsian The Nightmare—and sometimes it doesn't. The Tragedy of One's Own Soul, for example, is saved by a pretty vocal melody, but the words are narcissistic hyperbole in which the subject finds herself in a very ordinary relationship with communication troubles ("We don't have so very much in common/You don't have really very much to say. . . We don't talk to each other. . . In fact, sometimes weeks go by/We don't speak"), yet inflates her situation into a soul-searing tragedy. It's a kind of bathos or navel gazing, and it's a common Stevie thing.
__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump

FLEETWOOD MAC personally signed 45 - CHRISTINE McVIE
$265.77
FLEETWOOD MAC personally signed 45 - CHRISTINE McVIE pictureFLEETWOOD MAC personally signed Greatest hits LP cover - CHRISTINE McVIE
$119.58
FLEETWOOD MAC personally signed Greatest hits LP cover - CHRISTINE McVIE pictureChristine McVie Poster Fleetwood Mac Old /Warner Brothers
$29.0
Christine McVie Poster Fleetwood Mac Old /Warner Brothers pictureFLEETWOOD MAC STEVIE NICKS MICK CHRISTINE MCVIE LINDSEY GRAMMY AWARD POSTER
$24.99
FLEETWOOD MAC STEVIE NICKS MICK CHRISTINE MCVIE LINDSEY GRAMMY AWARD POSTER picture1978 Press Photo Christine McVie Rock Singer Songwriter - RRV30495
$19.99
1978 Press Photo Christine McVie Rock Singer Songwriter - RRV30495 picture



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:59 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 1995-2003 Martin and Lisa Adelson, All Rights Reserved