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  #226  
Old 04-11-2011, 05:33 PM
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This Day in Music: April 11th
04.11.2011Brought to you by ThisDayinMusic.com

Born on this day:

1956, Neville Staples, vocalist (The Specials, Fun Boy 3)
1958, Stuart Adamson, guitarist, vocalist (Skids, Big Country)
1966, Lisa Stansfield, vocalist
1969, Cerys Matthews, vocalist (Catatonia)
1987, Joss Stone, vocalist

1956, Traveling from Amarillo to Nashville, the plane Elvis Presley was a passenger on developed engine trouble and was forced to make an emergency landing. The incident created a fear of flying for Presley.

1961, Bob Dylan played his first live gig in New York City at Gerde’s Folk City, opening for John Lee Hooker.

1964, The Beatles set a new chart record with 14 singles on the Billboard Hot 100. The songs ranged from “Can’t Buy Me Love” at #1 to “Love Me Do” at #81.

1970, While in Germany Peter Green quit Fleetwood Mac but agreed to finish the band’s current European tour to avoid a breach of contract.

1981, Hall & Oates started a three-week run at #1 on the U.S. singles chart with “Kiss on My List,” the duo’s second American chart-topper.

1988, Cher won an Academy Award for best actress for her role in Moonstruck.

1988, Guns N’ Roses shot the video for their song “Sweet Child O’ Mine” in a ballroom in Huntington Beach, CA.

1994, Oasis released their first single, “Supersonic,” which peaked at #31 on the U.K. charts.

http://www.gibson.com/en-us/Lifestyl...sic-0411-2011/
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  #227  
Old 04-12-2011, 10:04 AM
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On this day in 1970, as The Beatles disintegrated, their single “Let It Be” hit #1 and on this day in 1970, guitarist Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac announced his departure from the original line-up in order to follow his religious beliefs.

http://kzok.radio.com/2011/04/11/the...fleetwood-mac/
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  #228  
Old 05-02-2011, 10:35 PM
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Default Danny Kirwan article April 26, 2011

http://www.seattlepi.com/lifestyle/b...Mac-964938.php
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  #229  
Old 06-10-2011, 03:02 PM
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Let’s Pick, Fleetwood Mac 2
By: Larue Friday June 10, 2011

Long ago, I began a diary to discuss the lolng history of OLD Fleetwood Mac, before Lindsey Buckingham N Stevie Nicks.

Because, I think they were always better, n I grew up loving that band.

As I mentioned in the first diary, that Mac with Lindsey/Stevie had commercial success, and indeed put out some great music, albeit it’s more pop centric nature.

This diary takes up from where the last one left off.

So, there we were loving the Old Mac 4 of Green (Peter Green’s Fleetwood Mac) which had a YOUNG Jeremy Spencer doing slide blues, old rock n roll and such, with Mic on drums, John McVie bass. N a few of them from John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, which also birthed Clapton, Beck N Page, but that’s another whole page n history of stuff.

N then some how The Mac found n added Danny Kirwin (see the wiki on Mac in first diary).

He was 18. N he changed the band.

But this band changed a LOT once they hit the USA.

Hey, here’s one with all Five Macs, early on.

Story is that Peter Green was working on this song, n Jeremy Spencer was no help with no desire to help. Don’t know if that’s true but it’s been said.

So, Danny Kirwin came on board, and helped Green finish this song, n that was the beginning of the end for Spencer. Sorta.

Shortly after the release of their second album Fleetwood Mac added guitarist Danny Kirwan, then just eighteen years old, to their line-up. Green had been frustrated that Jeremy Spencer had little desire to contribute to Green’s songs. A mature and accomplished self-taught guitarist, Kirwan’s signature vibrato and unique style added a new dimension to an already complete band. With Kirwan the band released their first number one single in Europe, “Albatross”.

Despite the supposed end of Spencer with the band, there was much to lie ahead before he completed his demise from the band.

Peter Green left the band according to WIKI in May of ’70. His problems with mental stability (LSD or or other?) led him to want to give all the band’s money to charity. N he quit. See the Mac Wiki for more detail.

So, the band’s in USA, touring, n Green leaves. First loss. 1970.

At this point, young Danny Kirwin n young Jeremy Spencer were left to carry on.

And dawg dayum did they carry on, with Kiln House, still one of my fav Mac albums of all time.

Kiln House:
This project showed the two of them reaching out, n doing their best without guru Green to lead. N they smoked it.

It also features one Christine Perfect, who did the album cover art work. N who on one or two songs, I forget, became part of the band.

You just can’t get any better than Christine Perfect, n she tears up the the blues classic I’d Rather GO BLIND (I’d Rather Be A Blind Girl) that Etta James made famous.

Lord I love them horns . . . but that’s another diary some time about Cold Blood, Chicago Transit Authority, Electric flag n of course, Tower Of power.

N all this time, I have failed to draw the connect from old Elmore James majestry that Jeremy Spencer was soooooooo good at!

At this time, a song called DragonFly by Danny Kirwin, showcased what was to come. N Kirwin was to become a hoss. This song tells his git flavor, just listen to that sustain n glory. We will talk more of Kirwin’s git sound, as we progress thru the Mac lineup changes.

Sadly, after Kiln House, and while on tour in the US, Spencer went out one day, and never came back. Per Wiki:

While on tour in February 1971, Jeremy Spencer said he was going out to “get a magazine”, but never returned. After several days of frantic searching, the band discovered that Spencer had joined a religious group, the Children of God. Liable for the remaining shows on the tour, they convinced Peter Green to help finish the tour. He brought along his friend, Nigel Watson, who played the congas (twenty-five years later Green and Watson would collaborate again to form the Peter Green Splinter Group). Green, however, would only be back with Fleetwood Mac temporarily, so the band decided to search for a new guitarist.

Incredible, now two greats had left, one had come back, for a bit.

N the band played on!

THIS led to a version of the band I can’t help feeling, was the best that Mic Fleetwood could ever have felt feeling, was the best (aside from Bucky/Stevie).

And this is definitely one of my fav versions of this band, ever.

They moved to LA, they went out and found Bob Welch, Green n Spencer were gone, and Kirwin had that haunting sound which paired up with the new gitslinger so well.

Bob Welch.

This led to two of the greatest Mac albums of all time IMHO.

Sadly, all the Fleetwood Mac youtube’s I want to present have been deleted.

So, just let me say that Future Games N Bare Trees were epic sounds with Kirwin N Welch.

My two favs of all time, Mac style.

Kirwin went on to be useless due to drink, n was fired from the band while on tour around ’72.

Others were added to the band, Bob Weston was a monster, but he fooled around with Mic Fleetwood’s wife, and was fired.

N by the end of Mystery To Me the band was hurting.

Christine was done with a drunken John McVie, Mic was dumped by his old lady, n then, along came Buckingham N Nicks.

N they disintegrated hard, too. The rest is history.

But before Buckingham N Nicks, The Mac had a few configurations that were incredible.

I hope all y’all will check out old Mac, their music, n chase their incredible history.

Especially the music of Welch/Kirwin, on Future Games and Bare Trees.
Man that was and is, some fine, fine music.

N that’s my end of The Mac.

Bless them, their music, and anyone who stops by.

http://my.firedoglake.com/larue/2011...eetwood-mac-2/
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  #230  
Old 06-15-2011, 10:58 PM
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Default If this article is not factual take it up with Andrew Vaughan

This Day in Music Spotlight: Goodbye John Mayall, Hello Fleetwood Mac
June 15, 1967

Andrew Vaughan|06.15.2011

In London in the mid-‘60s, John Mayall's Bluesbreakers were THE blues act to see. When guitar god Eric Clapton left, Mayall turned to another young guitar player who had previously filled in for E.C. when he was on vacation, Peter Green.

After a while Green pushed for drummer Mick Fleetwood to replace Aynsley Dunbar. John Mayall agreed and The Bluesbreakers became Green, Fleetwood, John McVie and Mayall.

Mayall was a mentor by nature and gave Green studio-time for his birthday gift. Green, delighted, recorded four songs with Mick Fleetwood and John McVie. Tracks included a Green vocal on “ First Train Home” and a prophetic instrumental, “ Fleetwood Mac,” so named after the band’s rhythm section.

Things were hunky dory for a while, but when Mayall fired Fleetwood for being drunk it was the beginning of the end for Green and the Bluesbreakers. On June 15, 1967 Green quit to start a new band. Green and his agent called on slide guitarist Jeremy Spencer, Fleetwood, and he worked on getting McVie. But McVie opted to stay with Mayall, so Green used Bob Bruning instead. The new band made their live debut at the Windsor National Jazz and Blues Festival in August 1967 as Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac featuring Jeremy Spencer.

With Mayall starting to move away from blues to jazz, McVie decided to join Green after all. When The band’s moody instrumental, “Albatross,” hit #1 in the U.K., Fleetwood Mac headed to America, quickly becoming one of the coolest blues bands on the rock scene, with Green in particular winning acclaim and plaudits from critics and peers.

Carlos Santana called Green’s playing “a holy grail of tone,” while B.B. King said his playing gave “cold sweats”.

In July 1969 Fleetwood Mac headlined the Schaefer Music Festival in New York City's Central Park, along with The Byrds, Chuck Berry, Miles Davis, Led Zeppelin, B. B. King, The Beach Boys, Frank Zappa and Patti LaBelle. Easily the biggest band in Europe in 1969, the end was not far away.

Green had become disillusioned with life in the fast lane and began to retreat from the fame game. At some point in 1969 he began to tell the band they should give away all their money. Nobody concurred, but Green personally began to divulge himself of cash and possessions, eventually leaving the band in 1970 and retiring from the music business.

http://www.gibson.com/en-us/Lifestyl...ght-0615-2011/
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  #231  
Old 06-15-2011, 11:27 PM
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"If this article is not factual take it up with Andrew Vaughan" - love that post title, vivfox!

Aside from some things that are open to question ("Easily the biggest band in Europe in 1969"? - I'd like to see something to back up that claim), the most obvious factual error in this is that the band was nowhere near NYC Central Park in July 1969, having canceled their planned US tour that summer to stay in the UK.
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  #232  
Old 07-30-2011, 07:52 AM
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Published: Saturday, July 30, 2011 at 3:30 a.m.

The withering Alabama heat isn’t a problem for Christer and Vanja Fridhammar, who flew to the Shoals to attend the W.C. Handy Music Festival.

The couple, from Goteborg, Sweden, are not strangers to the Muscle Shoals area, but this is their first visit to the festival, which celebrates the music of native son William Christopher Handy, the Father of the Blues.

“We love the heat,” said Christer, a retired banker who’s turned his attention to his first love, the blues. He hosts a website that chronicles a vibrant roots music scene in Goteborg, and Vanja photographs local musicians.

“The music is fabulous, and the heat is a bonus,” Vanja said.

So, how did someone from far away Sweden become enamored of a distinctly American music?

“I got into the blues when I heard Peter Green’s Fleetwood Mac at a concert in 1968,” Christer said. “It was like a religious experience. It opened doors.”

Fleetwood Mac began as a hardcore blues band in England in the late 1960s, and Green was considered on a par with Eric Clapton as a blues guitarist at the time.

Christer said that was “second-hand” blues, but began to investigate the band’s source material, which led him the early blues masters such as Robert Johnson and Blind Lemon Jefferson.

Christer and Vanja met years ago in Goteborg through a mutual friend in a local blues band.

“We met because of the blues,” Vanja said.

http://www.timesdaily.com/article/20...-up-atmosphere
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  #233  
Old 08-28-2011, 02:52 PM
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From a blog: Caelum Et Terra (Heaven and Earth)
http://caelumetterra.wordpress.com/2...fleetwood-mac/

Danny Kirwan and Fleetwood Mac
August 27, 2011 by Daniel Nichols

To most people Fleetwood Mac means the band, featuring Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham, that had a string of huge hits in the 70s.

But that was only one of the many incarnations of Fleetwood Mac. Before that the shining lights of the band were Christine McVie and Robert Welch. Curiously, Mick Fleetwood and John McVie, who gave the band their name and whatever continuity it had, never had a discernable sound of their own. They just sort of played along with whoever was the real creative force at the time.

And in its earliest incarnation that was Peter Green and Danny Kirwan. Although the band began, like so many British rock bands, playing straight up American blues, it was not long before Green and Kirwan began finding their own unique voices.

I commented when I was writing about the book Electric Eden: Unearthing Britain’s Visionary Music, that it was a strange omission to not mention early Fleetwood Mac at all.

Here is one of Danny Kirwan’s compostions, showing his work at its most beautiful:
[link to Woman of a Thousand Years]
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  #234  
Old 11-30-2011, 11:28 PM
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Excerpt from an Interview with Dough "Cosmo" Clifford

Stuff.Co.Nz 12/1/2011
http://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainment...ford-Interview

This triggers a memory of Fleetwood Mac - another band that's carried on along the road, members shifting, the music just keeps on drifting...and Clifford remembers seeing the Peter Green-helmed version of the band. "They would come out and hand around a bottle - and you know it wasn't the only thing that had been consumed. And they'd take the lid off and pass the bottle into the crowd. But they were just a great, great band. There was no question. Just awesome stuff. Very inspiring. Later they went in a whole new direction with the girls on board - and they nailed that too. I mean, they were one of the biggest bands in the world. I always felt that Lindsey Buckingham was an underrated guitarist; really an extraordinary guitarist."
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  #235  
Old 03-07-2012, 10:39 PM
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Default The long, strange trip of Girls' Christopher Owens

By Doug Davis Thursday, Mar 8 2012

The Grateful Dead sang, "What a long, strange trip it's been" a mere five years into their psychedelic journey. That was 10 years before Christopher Owens, songwriter-guitarist of the San Francisco-based band Girls, came into the world. That puts his trip at 30-plus years, and it has been strange indeed.

Born and raised within the Children of God cult, Owens roamed the world with his mother. He observed as she and her fellow members preached and trolled for new recruits through the devious techniques of the cult (Google "flirty fishing"). All cultural content — music, books, videos, pictures — was controlled by cult leaders, with most of it originating within the cult itself.

At least some of the musicians in the cult were competent. The guitar Owens uses to write virtually all his songs was a gift to the Owens family from Jeremy Spencer, a guitarist in the original roster of Fleetwood Mac. Spencer famously disappeared on tour in Los Angeles, eventually surfacing with a head shaved as cult member: a huge celebrity catch for them.

"There was this one center where like 500 members lived called The Jumbo, where all of our music, audio and video cassettes and books were made," explains Owens. "At one point, we got to live there, and Jeremy Spencer lived there too, and was kind of the musical director." Before joining the cult, Owens' mother had been a Fleetwood Mac fan, a point she made when the opportunity presented itself.

"He gave the guitar to my mom, for me and my sisters to learn to play," he continues, "and a couple years later, after we moved to France, I just became obsessed with it."

As soon as he could break away at age 16, he went to live in Amarillo with a sister who'd opted out of the cult. He was free to soak up all forms of popular culture he'd missed in his first 15 years, and was taken under the wing of Stanley Marsh 3, Amarillo's wealthy, eccentric art prankster famous for, among other things, creating the Cadillac Ranch.

The friendship remains strong, with Owens listing himself as a "former member of Stanley Marsh 3's Dynamite Museum"on his Twitter bio. "We are very much in touch, and he is still very big in my life," Owens confesses.

He eventually settled in San Francisco, and drifted through acknowledged bouts with drug addiction. He met and became fast friends with Chet "J.R." White, a fellow musician and producer, and they formed Girls in 2007. They've released two albums, the latest being 2011's Father, Son, Holy Ghost. Owens says the songs often emerge fully formed, captured by singing the lyrics and beat into his phone before they're lost.

He's wandering the world again, now as a touring musician. Owens creates video tour diaries he posts on YouTube under the name "chrissybaby4ever." They're fascinating, often tranquil and obviously personal.

"There's an element where I make them for myself, because I watch them too," explains Owens. "But for others, I also include things like sights that touch me, what books I am reading, or videos I'm watching, as a way of sharing something about myself."

Owens agrees when it's suggested his life reflects a kind of Newtonian social order. "Yeah, my mom, like a lot of people, kind of dropped out, joined this group and had kids, and now the kids have grown up and dropped out of that," he laughs.

http://www.dallasobserver.com/2012-0...stopher-owens/
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  #236  
Old 03-15-2012, 08:31 PM
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Carlos Santana first broke into the big time at Woodstock in 1969. I wasn’t there, but I marveled at his prowess even back then. I’m also struck by how he and his music have remained relevant to this day.

To tell you how much of a fan I am, I still have never been able to completely grasp the fact that the song “Black Magic Woman,” was written in 1968 by Peter Green, then a mainstay of Fleetwood Mac. But Santana made it a worldwide hit in 1970.

Go back and listen to the Mac track–it’s pretty awesome, if you ask me.

http://www.theimproper.com/music/494...ures-woodstock
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  #237  
Old 03-19-2012, 11:51 AM
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Peter Green’s Les Paul

The 1959 Gibson Les Paul of Fleetwood Mac’s Peter Green has one of the most fascinating stories of any sunburst. When Fleetwood Mac’s Peter Green bought his Standard, interest in ’bursts was rising again – partly due to Mike Bloomfield and Eric Clapton, whom Green had replaced in John Mayall’s Blues Breakers.

Green told Guitarist magazine in 1999, “I stumbled across one when I was looking for something more powerful than my Harmony Meteor. I went into Selmer’s in Charing Cross Road [central London] and tried one. It was only £110 and it sounded lovely and the color was really good. But the neck was like a tree trunk… It was very different from Eric’s Les Paul, which was slim with a very fast action.” £110 equals a still-considerable $2,500 today, but Green knew he had a bargain. Green’s Standard – very light in color, and what most now describe as “honeyburst” – featured on many of Mac’s late-’60s releases.

When Green walked away from music in the early ’70s with mental health problems, he sold the guitar to Gary Moore – the Irishman was a friend and close neighbor of Green’s in London. Green initially tried to give the Les Paul to Moore, but Gary insisted on paying the £110 it originally cost. There was also the understanding that if Green ever wanted it back, all he had to do was ask. But Peter never did.

The guitar was celebrated for its sweet tone. Some say Green tinkered with the neck pickup and accidentally refitted the humbucker reversed and “out of phase,” resulting in a more nasal sound. However, Jol Dantzig once had the chance to examine it and he said it wasn’t that the pickup being reversed that was the cause itself, but the actual magnets inside that neck ’bucker were out of phase with one another. Dantzig recalled, “This was the secret we’d all been searching for!”

In Gary Moore’s hands, the guitar featured on numerous tracks – notably the Blues For Greeny album of Fleetwood Mac covers dedicated to his hero. But Moore suddenly sold it in 2006. Why? Only Gary knew, but there were rumors that Gary – who had injured his hand and had to cancel a 2005 tour – was suddenly faced with huge insurance costs.

The guitar is now at Maverick Music in North Carolina. Probably in a vault.

http://www.gibson.com/en-us/Lifestyl...sts-0319-2012/
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  #238  
Old 03-19-2012, 05:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vivfox View Post
Peter Green’s Les Paul

The 1959 Gibson Les Paul of Fleetwood Mac’s Peter Green has one of the most fascinating stories of any sunburst. When Fleetwood Mac’s Peter Green bought his Standard, interest in ’bursts was rising again – partly due to Mike Bloomfield and Eric Clapton, whom Green had replaced in John Mayall’s Blues Breakers.

Green told Guitarist magazine in 1999, “I stumbled across one when I was looking for something more powerful than my Harmony Meteor. I went into Selmer’s in Charing Cross Road [central London] and tried one. It was only £110 and it sounded lovely and the color was really good. But the neck was like a tree trunk… It was very different from Eric’s Les Paul, which was slim with a very fast action.” £110 equals a still-considerable $2,500 today, but Green knew he had a bargain. Green’s Standard – very light in color, and what most now describe as “honeyburst” – featured on many of Mac’s late-’60s releases.

When Green walked away from music in the early ’70s with mental health problems, he sold the guitar to Gary Moore – the Irishman was a friend and close neighbor of Green’s in London. Green initially tried to give the Les Paul to Moore, but Gary insisted on paying the £110 it originally cost. There was also the understanding that if Green ever wanted it back, all he had to do was ask. But Peter never did.

The guitar was celebrated for its sweet tone. Some say Green tinkered with the neck pickup and accidentally refitted the humbucker reversed and “out of phase,” resulting in a more nasal sound. However, Jol Dantzig once had the chance to examine it and he said it wasn’t that the pickup being reversed that was the cause itself, but the actual magnets inside that neck ’bucker were out of phase with one another. Dantzig recalled, “This was the secret we’d all been searching for!”

In Gary Moore’s hands, the guitar featured on numerous tracks – notably the Blues For Greeny album of Fleetwood Mac covers dedicated to his hero. But Moore suddenly sold it in 2006. Why? Only Gary knew, but there were rumors that Gary – who had injured his hand and had to cancel a 2005 tour – was suddenly faced with huge insurance costs.

The guitar is now at Maverick Music in North Carolina. Probably in a vault.

http://www.gibson.com/en-us/Lifestyl...sts-0319-2012/
That was a steal! I paid $120 for my first 2nd hand Strat in '68 and that was regarded as cheap! Most name guitars in London were selling at twice the price. It's just that Les Pauls were not considered a saleable item when Pete bought his.
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Old 03-19-2012, 08:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vivfox View Post
Peter Green’s Les Paul

the neck was like a tree trunk… It was very different from Eric’s Les Paul, which was slim with a very fast action.”
Mine must be the same neck. It's like
playing a baseball bat.
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Old 04-02-2012, 01:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeremy spencer View Post
That was a steal! I paid $120 for my first 2nd hand Strat in '68 and that was regarded as cheap! Most name guitars in London were selling at twice the price. It's just that Les Pauls were not considered a saleable item when Pete bought his.
So you, and Peter both bought second hand Strats together. It's obvious since Pete's strat had a retro-fitted volume knob not from Fender stock. Any pre CBS Strat is gold. The tone an original pre mid sixties strat had with only a two tone switch is almost late 50's Les Paul territory. If you couple an original Fender Strat/Telecaster with a vintage Fender amp, you have tone perfection. That's why Peter's Les Paul worked so well with the Fender Dual Showman. Jesse Ed Davies' Tele with a Fender Showman was fat, as was Danny Kirwan's Tele.

Eric Clapton's "Bluesbreaker" 1960 Les Paul guitar was stolen in 1966. Either it still exists, and whomever has it isn't going to tell, or it's been lost due to some catastrophic event.

Last edited by slipkid : 04-02-2012 at 01:21 AM.
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