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  #16  
Old 12-31-2014, 07:17 AM
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All I Want For Christmas . . . Is Some Original Horror Flicks!
by Richard Spalding

So here I am, bored at work, surfing the internet in search of some good horror flicks to catch in 2015. Searching through Google News, I came across a Yahoo! list of 13 must-see horror films for the new year, and the Internet Movie Database (IMDb) list of upcoming horror films for 2015 and beyond.

Of course, I clicked on the links to check them out. What I saw left me somewhat excited, but more than a little disappointed, too.

The films that have me the most excited are the ones that sound as if they are going to breathe some fresh air, or at least ideas, into the horror genre. Spring. 31. Abattoir. It Follows.

Yet, for every interesting and seemingly-fresh movie I came across, there were probably 4-5 sequels, reboots, or retreads that made me realize why horror typically gets dismissed as an inferior genre of story-telling. For starters, just check out all of the sequels (or in some cases, prequels) that are slated to be released in 2015.

The Woman in Black 2 Angel of Death. Paranormal Activity: The Ghost Dimension. Insidious Chapter 3. Sinister 2. Amityville The Awakening. Friday the 13th Part 13. Chucky 7. Evil Dead 2. Halloween 3. Jeepers Creepers 3. Resident Evil: The Final Chapter. Rings. Saw VIII. The Conjuring 2: The Enfield Poltergeist. The Purge 3. The Strangers 2.

Seriously – not one of these movies will offer us anything different than what we got from previous installments. That doesn’t mean that all of these sequels will be terrible, just more of the same. And while an extra helping of “more of the same” is welcome here and there, there are 16 sequels listed above – an average of just over one sequel per month next year.

WHEREAS SEQUELS MAKE ME SHRUG AND SAY, “SURE, WHY NOT?” REMAKES GENERALLY FILL ME WITH THE SORT OF HOMICIDAL TENDENCIES THAT ARE BEST LEFT UNSAID, LEST THE FBI BEGIN RED-FLAGGING MY WRITING.
But sequels are a way of life, and while they usually offer more of the same, at the very least you are treated to a (somewhat) new plot with (somewhat) new characters. The same cannot be said for remakes, however, and there is a healthy does of these spawns of Satan set to insult their source material in the next year or two, as well.

Audition. Cabin Fever. Crimson Peak. Day of the Dead. Gremlins. I Know What You Did Last Summer. It. Poltergeist. Sleepaway Camp. Suspiria.

If you are at this site, and can honestly say that you have not seen at least 2-3 of the films listed above, then you have some homework over the holidays, my friend. Half of those movies should be found on any credible “Top _____ Horror Movies of All Time,” which automatically means they don’t need to be remade: they are already that good. As much as I like Rob Zombie, if you asked me which version of Halloween should be allowed to presented to future generations for their viewing pleasure, I sure as hell am not going to go with Zombie’s remake. (I don’t know if I can say the same for Zac Snyder’s reboot of Dawn of the Dead, though – but there are always exceptions to the rules!)

Whereas sequels make me shrug and say, “Sure, why not?” remakes (or reboots, if you prefer) generally fill me with the sort of homicidal tendencies that are best left unsaid, lest the FBI begin red-flagging my writing. Classic films don’t need to be remade: they’re classics. And ****ty films don’t need to be remade, either – ‘cuz they’re ****ty. Either way, my question is always, “What are the filmmakers hoping to accomplish?”

What can Sam Raimi add to Poltergeist that could trump what Tobe Hooper and Steven Spielberg did? How can a modern director hope to recreate the nightmarish look that Dario Argento infused his film with? And how likely is it that a remake of Audition will retain the slow pace of Takashi Miike’s original, which was absolutely essential in building the sense of dread that we felt as we watched the story unfold?

Of all the remakes that are listed, it is the one of Audition that has me disappointed the most . I just don’t see a modern director having the patience to allow the plot to develop as gradually as Miike did – I can already see some the big reveals that were saved for the final third of Miike’s film being revealed during flashbacks at much earlier points in the remake.

The fact that there are so many horror films being made right now is a testament to the popularity of the genre, but my enthusiasm is tempered by the fear that a string of lazy sequels and unnecessary at best (downright embarrassing at worst) reboots will kill the momentum that the horror industry has built for itself. There are too many talented writers and directors working within the genre today to have it reduced to such derivative efforts, which is why my Christmas wish for this is to see the industry become less reliant on resurrecting plots from the dead.

Sadly, I may have to wait until 2106 or beyond to see whether or not my wish came true.


http://1428elm.com/2014/12/24/want-c...horror-flicks/
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  #17  
Old 01-09-2015, 08:19 AM
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Dario Argento Debuts Autobiography 'Fear' at Courmayeur Noir Festival
by Ariston Anderson 12/13/2014 10:19am PDT

“There’s only one thing I know for sure: As long as there’s someone out there to scare, I know I will be a happy person,” writes Dario Argento in his new autobiography Paura (Fear).

The terror maestro presented his autobiography at the 24th edition of the Courmayeur Noir Festival, a yearly gathering celebrating the latest in film and literature thrillers in Italy's idyllic ski town underneath the Alps.

Argento, a regular guest of the festival, debuted the new book, which is published by Einaudi, to a room full of Italy’s cinema elite. The director, who has had numerous tales written about him over the years, said he wanted to finally set the record straight.

Paura mixes stories of Argento’s personal life with his career. “Thriller, horror, fantasy, giallo, noir, these are just words we use to define our dreams,” he writes. The director of classic Italian films including Deep Red and Suspiria, Argento discusses a wealth of topics such as his screenwriting process, his relationships, drug use and how censorship became his greatest enemy.

There's also a fair amount of advice from the 74-year-old director. "Things you say as a kid, write them down, put them aside," he writes, "and read them again when you’re a man."

"My life is long. I have lots of experience," Argento told THR in Courmayeur. "Some experiences are strange, but this is my life."

In one life-imitating-art event detailed in the book, the director was once stalked by a Suspiria superfan who called him anonymously over and over, repeating lines from the film, referring to himself only as the "great punisher," before mysteriously disappearing.

Argento recently completed a successful crowdfunding venture for his next film The Sandman, starring Iggy Pop as a maniacal serial killer. Fans donated generously to the film’s production, for perks including the opportunity to play a policeman cameo for $25,000 or for the chance to play the black-gloved killer in a scene for $5,000, a part that Argento has always historically played himself.

Argento told THR that his entry into crowdfunding is only just beginning. With the first phase wrapped, the film will commence a second crowdfunding phase in January.

"I am happy because it’s marvelous to have a relationship with fans," he said. "It becomes like a big family. Everybody speaks and says something about the film. It’s a great experience."

Argento met Pop in New York, and the two instantly connected on the project idea. "I think he’s a great villain," said the director. "He’s powerful. He’s a big icon."


http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...aphy-at-757476
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  #18  
Old 01-09-2015, 05:34 PM
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Originally Posted by SisterNightroad View Post
The images are from a series of beautiful limited edition posters. My closest friends gave me one on my 21st birtday.
This! My best friend gave me the Phenomena poster this Christmas. Jennifer has embossed insects in her hair. It's gorgeous!
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Old 01-09-2015, 05:54 PM
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This! My best friend gave me the Phenomena poster this Christmas. Jennifer has embossed insects in her hair. It's gorgeous!
I have my favourite movie's poster, Suspiria, and the dancer has beautiful gold finishings in her hair and she's wrapped in silver metal-wire.
It's beautiful and I commissioned a beautiful golden frame with red velvet inside for it last year as Christmas gift.
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Old 01-09-2015, 07:00 PM
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I have my favourite movie's poster, Suspiria, and the dancer has beautiful gold finishings in her hair and she's wrapped in silver metal-wire.
It's beautiful and I commissioned a beautiful golden frame with red velvet inside for it last year as Christmas gift.
Sounds beautiful! Suspirira is my favourite too, but I think that poster has sold out now. My friend picked Phenomena for me and I couldn't be happier. Definitely need to get it framed!
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Old 01-10-2015, 07:04 AM
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Sounds beautiful! Suspirira is my favourite too, but I think that poster has sold out now. My friend picked Phenomena for me and I couldn't be happier. Definitely need to get it framed!
Do you have the standard edition or the special variant one with metallic paint and glitters?
By the way I totally see it with an ebony frame!
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Old 01-10-2015, 10:31 AM
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Do you have the standard edition or the special variant one with metallic paint and glitters?
By the way I totally see it with an ebony frame!
Just the standard one, but it's still gorgeous. And an ebony frame would be beautiful!
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Old 01-10-2015, 01:49 PM
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Just the standard one, but it's still gorgeous. And an ebony frame would be beautiful!
Yes, also mine is the standard one but I prefer it to the variant deluxe poster because the other is only 2 colors, black and red, while mine is silver, black, gold and red. I was fortunate to discover it one year and a half ago, when the sale was just started, because they quickly run sold out.
I think the most beautiful were the Inferno poster, but I couldn't be happier too with Suspiria!
A silver frame with black or dark red velvet would work out too for Phenomena.
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Old 01-11-2015, 06:49 AM
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Slow Motion Radio Dario Argento Mix:

Goblin - Suspiria
Goblin - Profondo Rosso
Goblin - Tenebre
Claudio Simonetti - Opera
Ennio Morricone - L'uccello Dalle Piume di Cristallo

(Time-stretched x10)

https://www.youtube.com/c/SlowMotionTV


http://www.mixcloud.com/slowmotionra...o-argento-mix/
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  #25  
Old 01-12-2015, 06:18 AM
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Default I bet Stevie would like it

From the same italian artist that created the Dario Argento posters series:

La Belle et la Bete (Beauty and The Beast) Poster by Malleus

Artwork created to promote and celebrate a special screening of the 1946 french classic La Belle et la Bête. Dark City Gallery in conjunction with Mark Kermode and The Phoenix Cinema.





http://www.darkcitygallery.com/La_Be...ster_p/m32.htm

Last edited by SisterNightroad : 01-12-2015 at 09:31 AM.
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  #26  
Old 01-13-2015, 01:32 PM
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Horror Master Dario Argento on Fear and Happiness (Q&A)
by Ariston Anderson 8/6/2014 5:06am PDT

To walk into Dario Argento’s apartment in Rome, one would never suspect to be inside the home of one of the world’s most renowned horror directors. The man behind Deep Red, Suspiria and Phenomena, the man who launched Italy’s "giallo" (mystery, crime) genre to international audiences, lives alone inside of a spacious tidy flat in northern Rome.

Indeed most of the memorabilia he’s saved from his films are stored at the Museum of Horrors in the basement of his fan shop, Profondo Rosso, in Prati. Various awards are scattered among the dozens of bookshelves inside his apartment, and film posters line the hallways, the only hint of the Italian director’s career.

Argento, 73, takes a seat in a tall, stiff chair to protect his back, still in pain from a recent fall down slippery steps in his building. But the injury isn’t holding him back from attending the Locarno Film Festival where he’ll be a guest of honor at the Titanus Retrospective.

The Titanus studio represents Italy’s golden age of cinema, producing some of its most important films in the post-war era. With Argento, Titanus took a gamble on a first-time director who would turn out to be one of the world’s most iconic masters of horror. Locarno will screen Argento’s first film, The Bird with the Crystal Plummage, as well as a series of short scary films the director had made for Rai TV, which have never been shown outside of Italy.

The Hollywood Reporter spoke to the upbeat director about launching his career with Titanus, the moment he became a global name and what truly scares him.

THR: How does it feel to be part of the Titanus retrospective at Locarno Film Festival?

Argento: Very nice. It’s a beautiful place with a big, marvelous square to watch movies in the night. The other European film festivals are too formal. Locarno is a very happy festival. It’s one of my favorites.

My first film, The Bird with the Crystal Plumage, was possible because [Titanus chief] Goffredo Lombardo had a great deal of trust in me and financed this film. My whole career started from there.

Was your first film difficult to do?

It was not difficult because before that I was a screenwriter, and before that a film critic. I knew movies very well. My father was a producer. I knew film people. And then I wrote the screenplay and I did the storyboard, everything. The film was very much in my mind. I shot it in six weeks. It was a great first experience.


You started as a film critic in an industry that has changed a lot since you began. What do you think is missing from film criticism today?

Today the critics are too short, too simple. They have a possibility to examine films, to analyze films from many different aspects. Now the critics just tell us the story, the names of the actors, good, bad, finished.


At what point in your career did you know you had become an international phenomenon?

I think when I shot Suspiria. It was so spread out into the world then. There was a call from every country, from Japan, France, England, everywhere. And then I started to see my career have an upward curve.

The attention surprised me. Many books were written in so many countries. There was a very important moment when I was in Japan. We had such a big crowd; I was really stunned. Also, I remember the premiere in Paris. There was a huge theater that was full, and people were screaming and laughing, all the things you’d want.


Why has Japan in particular received you so well?

Japanese people think my films are inspired by Manga. The Manga was inspired by some of my films. I’m a part of Japanese culture. I’m a big friend of Banana Yoshimoto, a very important writer. She’s a big fan of mine. And all the Manga writers are big friends and admirers of mine.

I remember I was in Japan many times for my films. For Phenomena, Sony was the distributor, and we decided to try an experiment. It was a big theater and every chair had headphones. The film was played without sound, only through the headphones. It was very funny to see a silent film and watch people scream and laugh.


When in your career were you most happy?

Many times I was happy, and many times I was sad. It’s a sequence of your life. I had many very happy moments. But for me to shoot a film, there’s no happy moment, because it’s very tough. I’m not a happy, joyous director, no, no. A film is a tough thing. To think, to prepare, to invent every day, it’s not such a happy experience.


You’ve influenced so many directors globally. Did you ever see it as plagiarism?

No. I was happy to have followers, many directors who appreciate my films. Yes, and after this they usually became great friends of mine, like George Romero, John Carpenter, Tobe Hooper. I was also to influence the new generation of French and Spanish directors, and directors in South Korea, such as Park Chan-Wook, and in Japan and Hong Kong.


What’s your theory for using music in films?

I discovered how important music is, because it becomes one of the protagonists of the film. It helps not only to follow the story, but it becomes an expression of the film.

Each movie uses music and sound differently. I chose different musicians because I was a big fan of music before I became a director. So I knew a lot about music.


What was your favorite film score?

Of mine? Maybe Suspiria and Deep Red.


For you, what is the key element of horror?

Psychology is the most important element. It’s a shame because the latest horror films forget psychology and put the focus just on the special effects and the bloody scenes. Psychology doesn’t exist anymore in movies. This is not good because psychology is very important. For this reason, I say that the films of South Korea are the best today, because they’re horror films with a strong psychology.


When writing your scripts, do you put yourself inside the mind of your protagonist?

Yes. When I write a film, I try to become very young, like a child, to have a completely pure impression, not filtered by culture. And I write a film in this condition, from this viewpoint.


What’s your writing process?

I start with a small idea and I stay alone. Nobody lives with me, because I like to be alone and think about the idea. And then the idea grows and grows until it becomes a story. When I write a film, there are no distractions at all. I write all day long until I get tired and stop.


What was the writing process like with Bernardo Bertolucci on "Once Upon a Time in the West"?

Yes. When Sergio Leone chose me and Bernado to write a treatment of Once Upon a Time in the West, we worked together for months. We knew each other already as we are the same generation. I remember it was marvelous to work together. We went to see films together, American Westerns like John Ford. Then we’d go to a restaurant or walk around the city and get inspired to write it.


Is there anything you wouldn’t make a movie about?

I don’t have a taboo. Nothing’s off limits.


What scares you?

In my life? First of all, I’m scared of everybody, people on the street, yes. Everybody is scary.

But then I am scared by something profound, something impossible to explain, some sentiment that comes from deep within me. I wake up in the night very scared. Some parts of my films come from my nightmares.

I am lucky to have a possibility to speak with my dark side. This is important. I have a dialogue with my dark side, and in this dialogue I discover my films.


What are you working on now?

Now I just started writing the treatment for a new project. I don’t know when I’ll start the film. It’s a long time from the start of the idea to the film, a minimum of two years. Sorry, but I can’t tell you what it’s about yet.



http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...to-fear-723085
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Old 01-15-2015, 12:15 PM
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The art of film: galleries in the movies
From National Gallery to Skyfall, Anne Billson looks at the greatest film scenes set in art galleries

The most beautiful art gallery sequence, on the other hand, is surely the first ten minutes of Dario Argento's The Stendhal Syndrome, a title inspired by a real psychosomatic disorder (named after the French writer, who suffered from it) whereby great works of art make the sufferer swoon. The horror director's daughter Asia, somewhat miscast as a detective who suffers from the syndrome, is on the track of a serial killer in Florence, and pops into the famous Uffizi Gallery. Big mistake.
Botticelli's Primavera and Caravaggio's Medusa, two of the museum's most celebrated works, make her feel dizzy before she faints in front of Bruegel's Landscape with the Fall of Icarus (to be found, in real life, in the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Brussels) and imagines she's actually inside the painting. It's one of the strangest and most beautiful sequences Argento ever directed, though unless you're a hardcore horror fan it's probably best not to watch any further, since the film later gets bogged down in unpleasantness.



http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/f...he-movies.html
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Old 01-17-2015, 05:38 AM
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Top Ten Horror Film Scores
Gwendolyn Kiste Jan 14th, 2015 5 Comments

Horror movies would be nowhere without the music. There to amp up the scares and punctuate the chase, horror scores are vital in crafting an effective film. So for your listening pleasure, here are the top ten horror film scores. Kick back with some vintage headphones and enjoy the spooky ride.

Suspiria
Dario Argento’s surreal masterpiece is unforgettable, but try to imagine it without that inimitable Goblin soundtrack? Next to impossible, huh? That’s the sign of an effective horror score: so inextricably mingled with the terror that one simply cannot exist without the other. With its intensely beautiful melodies–and random lyrics thrown in just to enhance the off-putting aura–the Suspiria score is one-of-a-kind in the best possible horror way. And even without the Technicolor blood, Goblin’s theme song makes for a macabrely fun listen. A Me Decade accomplishment every way you look at it.

Phantasm
As one good turn inspires another, the score for Phantasm was heavily influenced by Goblin. The electronic sound of the 1978 mindbender is an exercise in strident melodies, but when there are evil tall men and shrunken minions in cloaks, no other tunes will do. Fred Myrow and Malcolm Seagrave might not be household names, but their Phantasm score remains one of the most memorable journeys into graveyard mayhem. Because as we all know, metal spheres with blades are always scarier when set to music.

Halloween
My mother and I were recently talking horror movies (because my mom is super awesome and knows her stuff when it comes to the genre). Without her being aware I was in the throes of drafting an article about horror film scores, she commented something along the lines of “Every John Carpenter soundtrack sounds the same. It’s good, but they’re all interchangeable.” Now I, of course, respectfully disagreed, but that being said, good ol’ mom does have a little bit of a point. Consequently, I chose only one film to represent Carpenter’s oeuvre. And while I have a real soft spot for the creepy music of The Thing (which was actually a collaboration between Carpenter and legendary film composer Ennio Morricone), Halloween is the slasher masterpiece that started it all, so it’s the obvious choice. The behind-the-scenes story goes that Carpenter screened the film with no soundtrack and quickly realized it wasn’t remotely scary. One laborious trip into the studio later, and he had a classic.

Near Dark
Remember back in the day when Tangerine Dream ruled when it came to film soundtracks? Oh, to travel back to the technologically simplistic days of the 1980s when a synthesizer and a Casio keyboard were all you needed to sound amazing and futuristic. Recorded in Berlin–with director Kathryn Bigelow in the studio during production–the score for the Oklahoma-set Near Dark is at once jarring and lilting, making it perhaps the most lethally beautiful dust storm you’ll ever meet.

Candyman
During the genesis of these lists, there is oftentimes one film in particular around which I construct the entire idea. The unnervingly lovely Philip Glass score from Candyman was the centerpiece of this week’s article. According to the lore behind the film, in order to persuade renowned composer Glass to craft the haunting music for the film, director Bernard Rose omitted details about just how gore-laden the finished project would be. Upon release, Glass was not entirely thrilled that he had scored what he deemed a conventional horror movie. However, he eventually came around–at least somewhat–as he added a few tracks to the Candyman II score and ultimately released the music–first on CD in 2001 and then on vinyl last year. Better late than never.

The Exorcist
The horror movie score that introduced the word “tubular” into the creeptastic vernacular. The score for the 1973 celluloid bastion of demonic possession is a bit of a mishmash and includes Mike Oldfield’s legendary “Tubular Bells”, which was released independently from the film’s soundtrack and was incidentally on the first ever album from Virgin Records. Another random research note: director William Friedkin later commented that he would have selected Tangerine Dream to score The Exorcist if he had heard their music sooner. Why, tubular bells! You suddenly sound so Reagan-era synth!

The Shining
Proving the value of the less is more aesthetic, the score for The Shining makes the most of every note, sometimes with no more than simple discordant chords during otherwise banal establishing shots. The original soundtrack for the film was scrapped after it didn’t pass muster with capricious genius Stanley Kubrick. Ultimately, there is empty silence as often as there is music, and that choice undoubtedly enhances the omnipresent terror of the Overlook Hotel. Room 237 please.

M
While we’re on the topic of “less is more”, how about a film with next to no soundtrack other than one classical tune? Consider exhibit A, er, M. The Fritz Lang masterpiece makes such effective use of Edvard Grieg’s Peer Gynt that the lovely song almost becomes nausea-inducing even when there’s no murderous Peter Lorre whistling it. And by the way, Peter Lorre actually couldn’t whistle, so that was Lang’s wife (and co-screenwriter) Thea von Harbou doing the soundtrack work for him.

Jaws
When my goddaughter was three, we introduced her to Jaws. This was a major initiation into the family. And despite being easily scared, she took to the film with aplomb. No matter where she was playing in the house, the moment John Williams’ inimitable score came on the television, she would stop what she was doing and announce “There’s that dangerous music again.” That’s the visceral power of melody. You can hear it from another room and know instantly what it means. So even if Bruce the Shark was less than cooperative on the set of the 1975 horror classic, that so-called dangerous music more than makes up for it.

Psycho
When it comes to horror movie scores, Psycho is truly the one to beat. After all, nothing slices straight through the public consciousness and stays there for over half a century quite like violins and Bernard Hermann. Originally, the shower scene was going to be silent. Then it was going to have jazz music (because really, why not?). But Hermann’s orchestral arrangement ultimately persevered, and celluloid history is forever changed–and all the better for it.


http://www.horror-movies.ca/2015/01/...r-film-scores/
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Old 01-19-2015, 05:41 AM
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Default Yes, I'm into Japanese stuff...

This anime called Yuri Kuma Arashi (=Yuri Bear Storm) has obvious Suspiria references. The accuracy in reproducing the movie setting is stunning:









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Old 01-23-2015, 09:01 AM
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Suspiria: Experience the True Nightmarish Genius on the Big Screen at Alamo
By Cory Casciato Thu., Jan. 22 2015 at 5:46 AM Write Comment
Categories: Geek Speak


Some films are simply better on the big screen. You can certainly admire the craft of 2001: A Space Odyssey on a 22" computer monitor and the pair of tinny speakers that came with your circa-1995 soundcard, but you're not going to feel the impact of the movie that way. Not many horror films demand this treatment, but if there's one from the genre that definitely deserves the kind of big-screen, theater-sound experience lavished on such classics as 2001 or Lawrence of Arabia, it's Dario Argento's Suspiria.


The power of Suspiria isn't in its story, which is a semi-coherent mess about a girl who finds her elite ballet school is actually run by a coven of witches. You won't find its appeal in the kills, which are both bizarre and inexplicable but lack the kind of visceral, stomach-churning detail that makes your stomach turn over in recognition and empathetic terror. What makes Suspiria special is its atmosphere, and you simply will not experience it properly while sitting in front of a TV set.

Experience is the key word here. In a theater, you do not watch Suspiria the way you do other films: You feel it. It invades your sensory sphere and replaces your normal points of reference with a skewed and unnerving set of alien sensation. Imagine the final sequence of 2001, only less cheesy, more horror-themed and far more intense. Now imagine that lasting nearly the entire runtime of the film, punctuated by a bare handful of "normal" scenes. If you are imagining something weird and disorienting, even delirious, you are on the right track.

Visually, Argento suffuses the screen with bright, primary colors -- especially red -- throughout the film. The way he shoots the architecture of the school and sequences his scenes, the place takes on a surreal, dreamlike quality. The scenes themselves, in typical Italian horror movie fashion, are often more than a little disconnected and not always strictly comprehensible, but where in most films that destroys the flow of the film's story, here it simply adds to the sense of unreality.

Paired with this odd visual approach is the unrelenting, incomparable score. Composed and performed by the legendary Italian band Goblin, in collaboration with Argento, the score is more integral to the film than perhaps that of any other horror movie ever made. If you replaced the music from Jaws with something else, the film would no doubt lose some of its impact; replace the score of Suspiria and the movie would, for all intents and purposes, cease to exist. The score, with its waves of distorted guitar sounds, throbbing synthesizer rhythms and inhuman-sounding voices, does as much work to build tension and terror as the visuals, and the film as a whole should probably be considered a collaboration between Argento and Goblin.

The combined result of all this could easily be called psychedelic, as it generally results in an altered state of consciousness. That's probably not quite right, though, unless you're looking for the kind of dark, demented experience that most psychonauts would undoubtedly call a "bad trip." Better instead to compare it to a nightmare, or perhaps a fever dream, the kind of sweaty, disturbing rush of images and sensations that awakens you from a heavy sleep, alone and afraid in the dark, relieved to find yourself merely in the grip of some illness rather than stuck in the hellscape created by your malfunctioning brain. Of course, after Suspiria, you'll find yourself awakening in a theater, surrounded by other horror fans, but the sense of relief will be the same. It's a special film and, more to the point, a special experience. Like the warnings on TV say, don't try this at home. You will be disappointed. Do it in the theater, or not at all.

See Suspiria the right way on Wednesday, January 28 at the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema. For tickets ($7) and more info, visit the Scream Screen: Suspiria event page.
http://drafthouse.com/movies/scream-...ia-35mm/denver

Find me on Twitter, where I tweet about geeky stuff and waste an inordinate amount of time: @casciato.



http://blogs.westword.com/showandtel...f_suspiria.php

Last edited by SisterNightroad : 01-24-2015 at 08:16 AM.
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