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Old 04-27-2011, 11:16 AM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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Default Beat Instrumental 1970

Peter Green
uncredited writer, Beat Instrumental, June 1970

'I felt I was doing nothing with my life because there was no challenge'

PETER GREEN, like many successful guitarists and singers, lives in the pleasant county of Surrey, but not in a sprawling mansion complete with private pheasant shoot, 16-track hi-fi doorbells, electric fence and all the other trappings required by the young businessman who has decided to enter the ranks of the landed gentry.

Along with his parents, Pete lives in a small but comfortable house in a quiet uninspiringly pleasant middleclass road in the south-west suburbs of the Metropolis. He doesn't have an elaborate chain of buck-passing secretaries and flunkeys to protect him from the harsh outside world: When I rang up, his old man answered the phone. 'Hang on a minute, would you', said Mr. Green senior. 'I'll get him for you. They're rehearsing at the moment. You can probably hear the row in the background, Peter! Phone!'

Pete occupies the back room, which he has filled with a hi-fi deck and tape, practice amps, drumkit, guitars, mikes, and a really impressive record collection ranging from Vaughan Williams to Fats Domino. Although he was due to go off to a gig later in the afternoon, Pete was only too willing to say what he plans to do with his life now that he has split from Fleetwood Mac. The one thing that emerges most strongly from talking with him is that, despite the suggestions of some people that he's lost it, he has kept his head far more than most who become so successful in such a short time.

There have been a number of slighting, sarcastic stories in the national and underground press about Superstar Green giving away all his bread, man, and going into a monastery to get it all together, man. The monastery story seems to have sprung form the fact that Pete spent a time on a commune in Germany with some friends back in the spring, getting himself some peace and quiet. The money episode has also been a little distorted: 'I am definitely leaving the group,' said Peter, 'and I have started to give away some bread. I'm giving away the money I don't need and which I'll never use. As long as I've got the instruments and equipment I need as a musician, I don't need any flash houses and cars.

'For instance, I'd really like an A.C. Cobra. I think they're fantastic cars, but I'm not going to get one. If I had one I wouldn't be able to freak every time a Cobra goes by!'

In fact, the money issue has assumed more importance than it deserves, for giving money away is by no means the only thing on Peter Green's mind. It is part of a wider attitude about what he wants to do with his life and how he can help to make the world a rather better place than it is at the moment.

Basically, Peter also has plans. 'I want to play a lot...jam a lot with people whether in public or at home. I used to be a respected musician and I want to pick up some of that again. I just want to carry on entertaining the good people and anyone else who wants to listen. I want to be free of the pressures that make you feel "Got to be good tonight because we are Fleetwood Mac and people have paid to come and hear us."

'Mainly, as I say, I want to jam and that is what I am doing. If anyone calls round here and suggests playing, then I'll go and play for the sake of enjoyment, and because I can get to know other people through playing with them. I played on the commune in Germany when I stayed there, and it was then that I found out how much I've changed, through playing personally for them. When the pressure is off it all just comes out naturally.'

Although he will be playing mainly for enjoyment, Peter still plans to play live and to continue making records. 'I am dubious about forming another group,' he said, 'but I'm going to do non-profit or free concerts, gigs where it costs next to nothing to get in. I want to work like that all the time, just entertaining.'

Peter, who has apparently thought of leaving the group before, has stayed on to record a last single with them and to complete the dates for which they had been booked. After that: 'I'm going to do an album of my own music, which will include one all-time song I've had for two years and a lot of very new things. I really want to just put down what I want to say on record.

Own studio

'One thing I would like is my own studio to work in, and I'm going to keep my Warner Reprise contract going. I should get enough money from writing royalties to stay alive and I have enquired about giving up my artist's royalties so the record could come out cheaper, but I've found out that it would make very little difference to the price in the shops, and it could get swallowed up by the retailers anyway.'

On top of this, Pete is giving his German friends on the commune, who appear to have had a profound effect on his thinking, a hand in organising a free concert in Munich. Peter believes that festivals are a good means of bringing people – 'the good people' as he calls them – together. 'The Isle of Wight Festival was a pure money-making event,' he said, 'but it was great because it was so peaceful, and there was this sense of everyone being together. It's a shame that it wasn't nonprofit making or that the profit couldn't have gone to something worthwhile – yes that could be the way to do festivals, couldn't it? If the money was going somewhere worthwhile, groups that can't afford to do all these free gigs would get paid O.K.'

And what does Peter think that Fleetwood Mac achieved, looking back over the past two years since their first album was released on Blue Horizon, when Fleetwood Mac were the idols of the blues purists who reacted so childishly when the group started playing some rock and roll, and getting records in the singles charts?

'I think that Fleetwood Mac were one of the most successful groups. They had three top singles and each one went higher than the last. That was good, because they were all songs we really liked and we just put them out as they were, with no attempts to make them more commercial or anything.

'We were successful both as a blues group and a singles group, but that isn't enough if you're not happy with it. I was feeling very frustrated and fed up with being successful. I felt I was doing nothing with my life, because there was no challenge.

'I think ‘Albatross’ was the most useful song we have ever recorded...the most useful for all time, because if you want Heaven on Earth, then you want to have heavenly music, and that was, I think. It was also good that people bought ‘Oh Well’. The second verse asks what you would do if you came face to face with God, and, having listened to that, perhaps people will think about it.'

Pete has certainly thought about this, and it his is belief in God that has led him to re-assess the direction of his life. Far from making his belief in eternal life an excuse for doing nothing on this earth, he sees it as his duty to do everything he can in this world. 'In my opinion the most admirable and best thing a man can do on this earth is to try and make an effort to be like Him – like God,' said Peter. 'Peace and love are the two most important qualities, and it's good when you see someone at least trying to follow that, making an effort. That's all I'm trying to do. That's the thing – to bring man to God and unite the two.'

This is why Pete decided to give away his excess money to an organisation helping to relieve starvation in underdeveloped countries. 'I had thought of putting the money where it would help educate the people in the underdeveloped countries, but I realised you can't educate people unless they've got food in their stomachs first.

'Giving the money away is a gesture, because I know the bit I'm giving won't do anything really, but I'd rather be without it and make that gesture.

'Five years ago I was just getting along in life, and like most people I just wanted a bit of fun, a bit of a laugh, you know? Because of work I didn't have the time to think of anything else. I was a butcher and then a French polisher and I didn't want to do any of that sort of thing, so I just forgot about everything and enjoyed myself. Now I have time to think I feel a strong communion with some force controlling my life. No one person can control my life.

'A lot of people are afraid to say it, but I feel I am guided by the Good Spirit, or God if you like.

'Everything is going too fast at the moment, but the most important thing is to care for one another. We are animals until we do that – and, let's face it, a lot of us still are.'

Although some will criticise him for being naive and for not just getting on and playing music instead of talking about God, there is no doubt that Peter Green is making his attempt to do something about problems he has seriously thought about, and to encourage the music lovers to do the same. 'Let's face it,' said Pete, 'we all want Peace. I can't see it all making out, because I think that's a dream world, but from there the possibilities are incredible, so the most important thing is to do all we can.

'It's not that I think my opinion is more important than anyone else's,' Pete added, obviously slightly worried about broadcasting his beliefs. 'Everyone should try and live by his own thoughts, but if we are going to have leaders, I'd rather have a John Lennon than a Lyndon Johnson. We need people who are for the people.'

'Oh, yes, by the way,' he asked, 'Will they put a picture in this article? I'd like that space to be taken up by words to get in what I've been saying. If you do use a picture, make it a small one.'
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Old 04-27-2011, 02:45 PM
dino dino is offline
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Thanks, never seen this!!! You've made a great contribution .
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Old 04-30-2011, 11:10 AM
Ms Moose Ms Moose is offline
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Thank you michelej1! It's great to read those old interviews from the sixties and seventies.

Reading this also made me think that PG was very open then, and that might have been part of his later psychological problems. The interview shows that he was not very good at taking care of himself......

Ms Moose
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Old 05-06-2011, 06:03 AM
THD THD is offline
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Default Peter Green's Beat Instrumental column

For a while, every month ,Peter used to write a little column in Beat Insrumental (I suppose it could have been written on his behalf ,and had his name put on it, but I doubt it .)
In his autobiog, Mick Fleetwood states that Peter wrote a column in the NME or possibly the Melody Maker(which were like weekly pop newspapers ) I don't remember ever seeing one in either publication ,and I think Mick or (his researcher ) got it wrong and meant the one in BI which was a monthly mag for musicians.
Peters writing were not technical -about how to play blues guitar- unfortunately,-other musicians did do lessons (the bass player from Argent for example did a bass guitar technique series ) The Peter's Green Column dealt with day to day things like looking after dogs or guitarists he liked (I dont mean looking after guitarists he liked ........) and the Snoggley Blues Band
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Old 06-07-2011, 09:38 PM
THD THD is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by THD View Post
For a while, every month ,Peter used to write a little column in Beat Insrumental (I suppose it could have been written on his behalf ,and had his name put on it, but I doubt it .)
In his autobiog, Mick Fleetwood states that Peter wrote a column in the NME or possibly the Melody Maker(which were like weekly pop newspapers ) I don't remember ever seeing one in either publication ,and I think Mick or (his researcher ) got it wrong and meant the one in BI which was a monthly mag for musicians.
I've dug out a copy and scanned selected pages which are attached to this (I hope !)
Attached Images
File Type: jpg PETER.jpg (90.7 KB, 52 views)
File Type: jpg File0065.JPG (97.2 KB, 42 views)
File Type: jpg File0064.jpg (88.5 KB, 50 views)
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Old 06-08-2011, 12:20 AM
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sharksfan2000 sharksfan2000 is offline
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Great stuff, THD! Thanks for posting. Fascinating to read Peter refer to the band as "the" Fleetwood Mac - I'd certainly seen that elsewhere in the band's early days but I was not aware that anyone actually in the band referred to them that way too.

And thanks to michelej1 for the original post in this thread too!
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Old 06-08-2011, 05:50 AM
THD THD is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sharksfan2000 View Post
Fascinating to read Peter refer to the band as "the" Fleetwood Mac - I'd certainly seen that elsewhere in the band's early days but I was not aware that anyone actually in the band referred to them that way too.

!
I didn't even notice that ! It certainly wasn't something I heard at the time and I never refered to them as such myself .
I was interested that he talks about switching to his black strat, and retiring his Les Paul ! I only ever saw him play the LP (and the 6 string bass ) however ,I think he plays a strat at the free Hyde park concert- pic of this in the Danny Kirwan's guitar thread. As Danny had just joined at this point - it all ties in with what Peter's saying in his column -but he must have soon tired of the Fender .
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Old 06-08-2011, 06:07 AM
THD THD is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by THD View Post
he talks about switching to his black strat, and retiring his Les Paul ! I only ever saw him play the LP (and the 6 string bass ) however ,I think he plays a strat at the free Hyde park concert- pic of this in the Danny Kirwan's guitar thread. .
Had a look at the pic and it looks like Peter's playing a sunburst strat to me but it's rather difficult to tell .
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Old 06-15-2011, 03:02 PM
zoork_1 zoork_1 is offline
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Default Beat Instrumental 1970

Thanks michelej1 ...

/z
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Old 06-23-2011, 01:11 AM
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Default Peter Green was an enlightened person in 1970

He was one of the few who saw through the "crap" during that time of rock stardom. He didn't like the fact that gigs were charging over a Pound. He was a pure soul, who saw the future of rock/pop music, and he didn't like it.

Yet he left his last song with FM (The Green Manalishi) as a blueprint for British heavy metal (and Queen).

Green was not crazy when he left FM 5/70. It's when PG stopped enjoying music (as per Bob Brunning ('72/'73?)). That's when he "changed".


I have to add, that Green comment about admiring an AC Cobra, yet knows if he owns it he will miss the thrill of hearing it to "freak out". That's zen! That is a person who does not seek to possess what he enjoys in life. He only admires it when the rare occasion comes an AC Cobra crosses his path.

Last edited by slipkid; 06-23-2011 at 01:24 AM..
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Old 08-07-2011, 02:50 PM
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Default More from the Peter Green Column

I've dug out a couple more copiesof BI The text follows as the file size limited to 100K makes it difficult to read any attachment when enlarged as the quality is so poor !it's also a pain trying to adjust the file size to get it below the limit without making the quality so bad that it's completely pointless Ie you cant even tell that it's Hendrix !!

The Peter Green Column

BEFORE I go babbling on about
something or other, I'd first like to
thank everybody who bought "Mr.
Wonderful" and "Need Your Love So
Bad". I hope they turned you on. We have
just started working on the next Fleetwood
Mac LP which is going to be a big sur-
prise, and may even shock a lot of people
—especially our critics. We are taking
lots of time on this one, and being very
critical about what goes on it. So if it takes
a long time to be released, sorry. But, it
will be worth waiting for, I promise you.
While on LP's, if you want to go on a
blue trip, try Duster Bennett's incredible
album. Once more, here is proof that
white cats can do it as well as brown
ones. For even more proof, just listen to
Gordon Smith sometime.
Anyone seeing us lately will have
(open mouthed) observed Danny Kirwan
our new member, putting a Fender Strat
through its paces, and turning out to be
one of the most exciting guitarists ever
heard.
I've recently realised that I have been
neglecting my own guitar playing, while
I've worried more about good lyrics. Now
I intend to sort this out. I've written an
instrumental which we may release as
our next single, but it will definitely be
included on our new LP. Titled "The
Albatross", I think it's going to be a
real classic in the instrumental field,
along with "Apache" and "F.B.I.",
etc. . . . sorry Hank, no offence.
See you all in next month's issue, when
Pete Green converts the world to being
vegetarian.
Bye, blue kids,
PETER GREEN.

If anyone wants me to put up the Savoy Brown article which is on the remainder of the page let me know please


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File Type: jpg File0083.jpg (82.9 KB, 22 views)
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Old 08-07-2011, 02:57 PM
THD THD is offline
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Default Player of the Month -Jeremy

Attachements to this Text of which is below


Jeremy Spencer

THE name Elmore James is quite
probably engraved on the heart of
Jeremy Spencer, slide guitarist with
Fleetwood Mac, a small man (5 ft. 4^ in.),
light-weight (7 stone 7 Ib.), brown-eyed.
For it was listening to the guitar style of
Elmore that set off Jeremy on a pop scene.
Jeremy was born in West Hartlepool,
County Durham. His dad is a superinten- ,
dent of the R.S.P.C.A., a piano player in
his spare time. Jeremy started on guitar
in 1964 . . . mainly because he liked the
fretboard sound of people as the Shadows '
and Buddy Holly.
But there was always Elmore James
lurking in the background. Says Jeremy;
"I wanted to play like him. I had a
Spanish guitar first of all, tried to tune it,
then went to an electric Hofner, with a
tremolo arm—1 thought that's how he did
it, but I broke a lot of strings that way.
"Then I had a Harmony H75, a big
one. Then a Fender. A Telecaster. Then
I borrowed a guitar, a Jennings cello
body—the best I ever had, but I had to
give it back. Now I use a Gibson. But
my pride is an old model, same as Buddy
Holly's, and I only wish I could use that
on stage.
"So Elmore James was the big fad.
I like the sound of Albert King, for
instance, but I'm not really just a guitar
fan. I go more for the sound of records...
the voice and the general sound. I've
enough records at home. Maybe 200
albums and, the real pride, about 200 of
the old rock singles. Guys like Fabian,
Tommy Roe, the Crickets—without
Holly.
"Sometimes I get asked for advice.
I don't know what to give. People like to
get technical—I suppose I'd say don't
get technical. But I copied somebody, or
tried to, but that wouldn't be my advice.
Anybody who says he wasn't influenced
by somebody else, though, is talking
through his backside. But I suppose I
should talk about slide guitar technique.
Well, the advice is to keep it simple,
otherwise it sounds like a whiny mess.
"Over my own work with Fleetwood
Mac, well—I don't really like playing
my own stuff. Except the 'B side' on
Man Of The World—-I was very pleased
with that. But there are some of our
records that I really didn't like.
"I did some stuff with Chess Records
in America and I suppose I liked that
best of all. But then that was the nearest
I got to sounding like him."
Him, of course, was Elmore James.
Everybody has an idol. Jeremy sticks to
his. Which is fair enough.


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Old 08-08-2011, 12:38 AM
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sharksfan2000 sharksfan2000 is offline
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THD, thanks for posting the old columns from Beat Instrumental - always fun to read these!
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