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  #61  
Old 06-12-2010, 11:41 PM
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The Top 13 Mad Musical Geniuses | The Top 13 | www.thetop13.com
This guitar legend and Fleetwood Mac founder influenced greats ranging from Jimmy Page to BB King. But Green also spent years binging on LSD and was in and out of mental hospitals, growing his fingernails bizarrely long (as you can see ...
The Top 13 - http://www.thetop13.com/
Peter Green is #8, but that's not my concern.



Of the most hated sports teams, how can the Philadelphia Eagles rank #6 compared to the others that are just out of jealousy because they have won championships within the last twenty years? The Eagles haven't won a championship in 50 years. I credit ESPN for going out of it's way to make sure they can get a cheap story of bad fan behavior from Philadelphia, while letting other cities (such as NY, Chicago, Boston, Washington) off the hook.
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Old 06-12-2010, 11:46 PM
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1. Peter Green—Oh Well (Fleetwood Mac, Then Play On, 1969). Green is still alive, which is sort of amazing given the Class As and the schizophrenia. He replaced Eric Clapton in John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, and did a better job. Green is pure blues here, and his most recent band, Peter Green’s Splinter Group, put out some fine blues albums in the 1990s and 2000s. After he left Mayall’s band he founded Fleetwood Mac—which he also left a couple of years later, but not before putting out the classic Then Play On. I recall seeing an interview with B.B. King at some point where he said the only guitarist that ever scared him was Green. Green has a very pure sound, much like what Mark Knopfler developed. Green got there first.

http://www.scholarsandrogues.com/201...-guitar-solos/

They aren't very scholarly since the "Oh Well" solo is Danny Kirwan, not Peter Green. "Love That Burns" would have been a "scholars" best choice.
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  #63  
Old 06-12-2010, 11:51 PM
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There's a blues undercurrent to the album, from the title to opener "Jefferson Jericho Blues" to something more indefinable and haunted in the shadows. If anything, Mojo hews close to the blazing blues-rock of early Fleetwood Mac.
"I love Peter Green! He's one of my idols. I could listen to Peter Green all day. And that's very much what I had in mind on a lot of the [new] stuff. I wanted to get a sound that mixed up say the Chicago Chess stuff and John Mayall, Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac, early Jeff Beck Group. These were records I played to the engineer a lot before we began the project," says Petty. "I told him, 'I want the guitars right up loud, as loud as the vocals when [Mike] plays,' and I think we succeeded at that. Mike's just amazing. He really stepped up and did his part."

Campbell is right out front on Mojo. It's a refreshing change of pace and perhaps a chance for folks who haven't paid close attention the past 35 years to discover just how tremendous a guitarist Mike Campbell truly is. Often he's an extremely tasteful, subtle, respectful player, working into the muscular of the music rather than riding on top.

"I tried to kinda drum that out of him [laughs]. It was like, 'Okay, let's show 'em what you can do. Just rip and have some fun.' He never let us down," enthuses Petty. "I've known Mike and Ben for so long and they still amaze me. I couldn't dream of playing with anyone else."

http://www.jambase.com/Articles/Stor...?storyID=23022

This is very cool!! I've noticed the past two years on Sirius/XM's Tom Petty show that he has played a lot of Peter Green FM or Mayall/Green songs. His 2006 30th anniversary concert from his documentary DVD featured a dead-on cover of "Oh Well" (the Boston Tea Party 2/70 version with the extra solo).
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  #64  
Old 06-13-2010, 11:14 AM
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peter green

the original 59' peter green les paul

peter green in action during old fleetwood mac days

i'm supposed to be doing my 2000 word history essay but i kinda got sidetracked while listening to peter green on john mayall and the bluesbreakers and fleetwood mac, so this shall be a tribute post!

NOT! just gonna go about praising his tone actually. alright fine some brief history of the man (and his guitar) first. peter green got noticed in the music scene after replacing eric clapton in the john mayall and the bluesbreakers band. after playing on a record he moved on to form fleetwood mac, which i'm sure a few of you have heard of. what many don't know about fleetwood mac is that it used to be a blues/rock band, before it defected to pop music when peter green left the band after being diagnosed with schizophrenia due to abuse of LSD.

many cite him as one of the pioneers of blues rock because of his "darker blues" playing style and holy grail les paul tone, though never reaching quite the commercial success of eric clapton and jimmy page. and what's the secret to peter green's tone? well its quite obvious isn't it, knowing my blog...

notice the pickups

his guitar!! actually, the pickups on his guitar. but then again, this subject has been on debate by guitar people all over for a long time, and the world still isn't too sure what it is that gives him his brilliant tone. some say its in the fingers, but i'm just gonna go with his pickups, which are wired out-of-phase (whatever that means) that give his tone the mojo!

peter green used a gibson les paul which he modified in 1967, having the neck pickup rewired and reversed. also, peter green used to be gary moore's mentor, and sold him his gibson later on. so in many gary moore albums, you actually hear his guitar, but gary moore's tone is NOTHING and i repeat NOWHERE near to peter green's. i guess the amps and effects play a role as well. gary moore later sold the guitar for 1.2 million dollars, not sure to who.

download the john mayall and the blues breakers album - a hard road. there are a few tracks where his guitar tone (and playing) really stand out. tracks i'd suggest are dust my blues and so many roads. keep in mind this is british blues, which to some might seem boring/bland. oh and this album has lotsa harmonica stuff as well!

if you're interested, you can get a replica version of the PG (praveen ganesh luls) les paul, pre-aged and with the modified pickups from Vintage guitars. do check out the review as well. the wear doesn't look 100% authentic but what do you expect from a 400 quid made in china guitar? the only downside is they have hardly any dealers outside of england, bummer.

http://rikipu.blogspot.com/2010/06/peter-green.html
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  #65  
Old 06-14-2010, 11:31 PM
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They aren't very scholarly since the "Oh Well" solo is Danny Kirwan, not Peter Green.
I did not know this for sure, but it doesn't surprise me in the least.
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  #66  
Old 06-15-2010, 09:05 PM
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For all that it is one of his staples, Black Magic Woman is actually a 1970 cover of a 1968 Fleetwood Mac rendition written by Peter Green. A medley with Gabor Szabo's 1966 Gypsy Queen, Santana's version works in exotic Hungarian rhythms with folk and latin strains. The album Abraxas, on which Black Magic Woman appeared, went to #1 and quadruple platinum, largely on the strength of the song.

It is possible, however obliquely, that the song was partly responsible for Peter Green leaving Fleetwood Mac. After it was released, Green reputedly befriended some people who were actually into black magic. In an interview with Cameron Crowe of Rolling Stone magazine, Christine McVie said these were the people who turned him on to acid, which led to Green leaving Fleetwood Mac.

http://www.wnew.com/2010/06/video-cl...n-santana.html
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  #67  
Old 06-15-2010, 11:47 PM
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For all that it is one of his staples, Black Magic Woman is actually a 1970 cover of a 1968 Fleetwood Mac rendition written by Peter Green. A medley with Gabor Szabo's 1966 Gypsy Queen, Santana's version works in exotic Hungarian rhythms with folk and latin strains. The album Abraxas, on which Black Magic Woman appeared, went to #1 and quadruple platinum, largely on the strength of the song.

It is possible, however obliquely, that the song was partly responsible for Peter Green leaving Fleetwood Mac. After it was released, Green reputedly befriended some people who were actually into black magic. In an interview with Cameron Crowe of Rolling Stone magazine, Christine McVie said these were the people who turned him on to acid, which led to Green leaving Fleetwood Mac.
Out of respect, the story is Carlos Santana visited Peter Green while the band was recording "The Green Manalishi" in London, 4/70. He asked Peter Green's permission to cover "Black Magic Woman". The "black magic" came before in Munich, 3/70 on a tour of Europe.

I still say Munich is a Fleetwood Mac fairytale to explain the actions of a band leader who didn't want to be in a famous rock band, with a lot of phonies (agents, producers, managers). Peter saw through all that b.s. at the time. While his drug abuse at the time led to his mental breakdown (three-four years later), Peter Green was playing at the top of his game the day he left Fleetwood Mac. Green even came back to replace Jeremy Spencer later winter/early spring U.S. tour 1971. That infamous Fillmore East concert is legendary from those who attended.

Last edited by slipkid : 06-15-2010 at 11:51 PM.
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  #68  
Old 06-16-2010, 12:08 AM
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peter green

the original 59' peter green les paul

peter green in action during old fleetwood mac days

i'm supposed to be doing my 2000 word history essay but i kinda got sidetracked while listening to peter green on john mayall and the bluesbreakers and fleetwood mac, so this shall be a tribute post!

NOT! just gonna go about praising his tone actually. alright fine some brief history of the man (and his guitar) first. peter green got noticed in the music scene after replacing eric clapton in the john mayall and the bluesbreakers band. after playing on a record he moved on to form fleetwood mac, which i'm sure a few of you have heard of. what many don't know about fleetwood mac is that it used to be a blues/rock band, before it defected to pop music when peter green left the band after being diagnosed with schizophrenia due to abuse of LSD.

many cite him as one of the pioneers of blues rock because of his "darker blues" playing style and holy grail les paul tone, though never reaching quite the commercial success of eric clapton and jimmy page. and what's the secret to peter green's tone? well its quite obvious isn't it, knowing my blog...

notice the pickups

his guitar!! actually, the pickups on his guitar. but then again, this subject has been on debate by guitar people all over for a long time, and the world still isn't too sure what it is that gives him his brilliant tone. some say its in the fingers, but i'm just gonna go with his pickups, which are wired out-of-phase (whatever that means) that give his tone the mojo!

peter green used a gibson les paul which he modified in 1967, having the neck pickup rewired and reversed. also, peter green used to be gary moore's mentor, and sold him his gibson later on. so in many gary moore albums, you actually hear his guitar, but gary moore's tone is NOTHING and i repeat NOWHERE near to peter green's. i guess the amps and effects play a role as well. gary moore later sold the guitar for 1.2 million dollars, not sure to who.

download the john mayall and the blues breakers album - a hard road. there are a few tracks where his guitar tone (and playing) really stand out. tracks i'd suggest are dust my blues and so many roads. keep in mind this is british blues, which to some might seem boring/bland. oh and this album has lotsa harmonica stuff as well!
I'm not blaming you Vivfox, you're only the messenger.

The irony of this blog post is that Peter Green's special "tone" wasn't heard until he formed Fleetwood Mac. While the blogger lists examples of tone (he does give credit to playing, barely), from John Mayall's "A Hard Road", it's still a factory stock '59 Les Paul. At the very least, the neck pickup was missing.

If this blogger ever heard "Fleetwood Mac" (the original 1968 album), he would never call British blues "boring or bland". I would also recommend the "Live In Boston" Volumes 1 and 2 from the Boston Tea Party, recorded 2/70. It also wouldn't hurt to do a few Peter Green Fleetwood Mac hits on Youtube.


To set the record straight, a great example of Peter Green's flipped magnet tone is the studio "Black Magic Woman" guitar solo.

I tried to respond directly to this person's blog last night, but I don't have the proper account. If someone could help me send this post to him? Thanks.
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  #69  
Old 06-17-2010, 01:41 AM
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Review of the Fleetwood Mac CD Heroes Are Hard To Find
Thursday June 17th 2010, 9:04 am

Fleetwood Mac have been a heavy hitters in the Rock genre for quite a while now and Heroes Are Hard To Find is an excellent illustration as to why.

Heroes Are Hard To Find is a pleasantly varied, mix of 11 tracks that are very well written and brilliantly performed songs by these clearly talented musicians. With many of the songs displaying a lot of the kind emotion that makes for a really great listen. Seemingly drawing from what I can only imagine are their own personal experiences. At different points touching on the most real emotions of love, heartbreak, pain, failed relationships and unattainable romance. They’re all here.

Listen to Heroes Are Hard To Find and I believe you’ll find there’s not much to dis-like about it. The songs are inspired, the production is simply outstanding, and this is clearly the work of a group of musicians in top form. So much so that if you’re even mildly into Rock music you’ll enjoy this CD.

While the entire CD is outstanding the truly standout tunes are track 2 – Coming Home, track 9 – Prove Your Love, and track 11 – Safe Horbour.

My Bonus Pick, and the one that got Sore [...as in "Stuck On REpeat"] is track 1 – Heroes Are Hard To Find. Outstanding!

Heroes Are Hard To Find Release Notes:

Fleetwood Mac originally released Heroes Are Hard To Find on October 25, 1990 on the Reprise label.

CD Track List Follows:

1. Heroes Are Hard To Find 2. Coming Home 3. Angel 4. Bermuda Triangle 5. Come A Little Bit Closer 6. She’s Changing Me 7. Bad Loser 8. Silver Heels 9. Prove Your Love 10. Born Enchanter 11. Safe Horbour

Fleetwood Mac: Bob Welch (vocals, guitar, vibraphone); Christine McVie (vocals, keyboards, Arp string synthesizer); John McVie (bass); Mick Fleetwood (drums, percussion). Additional personnel: Pete Kleinow (pedal steel guitar). Recorded at Angel City Sound, Los Angeles, California in July 1974.

http://chumphonlive.com/blog/kelliwi...-hard-to-find/
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  #70  
Old 06-21-2010, 12:03 PM
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fleetwood mac fans owe a great deal of love to bob welch. welch kept the mac afloat during the early 1970s, while success was elusive. he came in after peter green and jeremy spencer, two of the three main dudes of the band, left (green left for a solo career; spencer left to join the questionable Children of God.) i’m sure most mac fans probably can’t name any songs whatsoever on the three albums during welch’s era; though one welch song, later re-recorded, became a monster hit for welch as a solo artist (sentimental lady, a song that sounds more like a commercial, maybe selling some feminine hygiene product perhaps…)

anyway, welch went solo just before the mac hit it big. nicely, though, christine mcvie and mick fleetwood make appearances on his solo album french kiss, which includes the revamped sentimental lady as well as our song du jour, ebony eyes. he did quite well, had a few other minor hits, and then sort of fell off the radar. he continued to make music of course, including an experimental bop album, but he hasn’t yet achieved the same success as he had with french kiss.

ebony eyes is a sweet little rocker with a menacing guitar hook. i was about 12 when this came out, and it definitely screams seventh grade to me whenever i hear it. sure, seventh grade was a delightful year; i had a teacher who was prepared to dislike me intensely because my Middlebro gave him a run for his money three years prior. (oh, the fun of having to prove myself to a teacher who i believed in my infinite tween heart was an idiot. but this would be the first of many times when i would get one of Middlebro’s former teachers and they would either be pleasantly surprised at what a nice young lady and good student i was… or, in the case of chemistry and physics classes, the teachers were incredulous at how i was dumb as a post in the hard sciences, especially after following my smarty-pants brothers. sigh. it stinks being the youngest sometimes.)

anyway, when i wasn’t trying to be the best girl in the whole world for that teacher, i was one of the many, the proud young ladies getting attacked in the locker area. yes, this was a time when boys ran around snapping your bra as well as your rainbow suspenders, which were in vogue then.


yes, virginia, these suspenders were all the rage once.
i’m not certain my back ever recovered from it all.

so as you can see, ebony eyes gave me hope. it spoke to me: one day, i believed, i’d find men who were interested in more than just pawing at my clothes… men who will actually look at and in my eyes (once they weren’t obscured by humungous 1970s era glasses.) men who will like me just because i’m me.

let’s just say it took awhile.

http://www.wrekehavoc.com/index.php/...yes-bob-welch/
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  #71  
Old 06-23-2010, 09:37 PM
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Written on June 23, 2010 at 12:00 am by Tori Norskog
Rock legend makes a come back in Virginia City


When he sat down at the Pioneer Bar after he got off work at the Virginia City Cafe, Dave Walker immediately ordered a non-alcoholic beer.

The bartender, Rosy, brought him his drink and then changed the song playing to one of, what he thought was, Savoy Brown’s songs. Savoy Brown is the band Walker spent the majority of his career with and is most well-known for being a part of.

Once the song came on, Walker stopped Rosy at once, barking “That’s not me, that’s a wanker!”

Rosy eventually found a Savoy Brown song, one of their hits called “Street Corner Talking,” and said, “I was in my 20s when this song came out. I was in college when I first heard this song.”

Walker looked down humbly and giggled.

“It turns out I’m still fairly well known in my generation. I was unaware of this,” he said.

Aware or not, after more than 50 years of performing, Walker is still very well-known and continues to do what he is best at.

“I feel more at home doing that (performing) than I do anything else, it comes naturally to me,” Walker said. “For years and years before and after Savoy Brown I denied my musical self because I thought I wasn’t valid.”

But now, he is accepting his validity and talent and making a come back.

His current band, the Dave Walker Band, has been invited to play on the main stage at the Rockin’ the Rivers music festival with the Doobie Brothers in August.

This performance will come just after the Dave Walker Band releases their first album, called “Crazy All the Time.”

While Walker has played in 13 countries with legends like Black Sabbath and Fleetwood Mac, he said the Dave Walker Band is his favorite band he has ever worked with.

“We are equal. We have musical integrity. We play the best we can all the time,” Walker said.

He also said his current band includes the best musicians he has ever played with, and his band mates are just as enthusiastic about playing with him.

“He is an exceptional singer. There is something about the way he sings that I can’t pinpoint. He’s world class. He’s a rock singer with subtlety,” said base player Eddie Tsuru.

Walker moved to Montana from New Mexico in 1998 to escape a bad marriage. When he first got here, he tried to make a home in Bozeman, but didn’t like it much.

Then, three years ago, he went through Virginia City and thought: “This is more like it,” and he has been there ever since. His fortune in finding Virginia City still astounds him.

“We kinda live in paradise,” Walker said.

When he moved to Virginia City he began to resuscitate his music career. He recorded his solo album “Walking Underwater,” which got him introduced to his now band members Jimmy Lewis who plays the guitar, Eddie Tsuru who plays the bass, Chris Cundy who plays keyboards and Mike Gillan who plays the drums.

The Dave Walker Band plays an eclectic range of genres including blues, R and B, funk, country and classic rock.

He has been able to be himself with his current band, Walker said. He is an eccentric, enigmatic personality who is not afraid to go a little nuts and speak his mind, which is a characteristic his band mates value in him.

“They turn me loose,” Walker said. “Fleetwood Mac was afraid to turn me loose, so not much creatively happened.”

His current band, however, appreciates his opinion and what he brings to the table.

Tsuru, whose first concert was seeing Savoy Brown, said one of his favorite parts about working with Walker is the stories he shares. Walker, 65, was born and spent most of his younger years in England, where he got the opportunity to meet a lot of musicians who would become legends.

“He is connected to all the great rock stars from England,” Tsuru said. “His drinking buddy was John Bonham from Led Zeppelin. He had breakfast with Richard Blackmore from Deep Purple. I found a picture of him sandwiched between John Lennon and David Bowie.”

One of Walker’s favorite memories is a show back in 1991 with Savoy Brown in Budapest, Hungary, when the country was still behind the Iron Curtain.

The promoter of the show was excited about the concert because she thought they were going to get nearly 750 people, and then 2,200 ended up attending, Walker said.

“That was when music was an international language,” he said. “We were playing in this communist country and were able to communicate. Performers can do more good in terms of crossing international barriers in an hour and a half than most politicians can do in 20 years. That’s maybe the coolest thing about what I do.”

Another musical experience he recalled was when he was 18 and played a four concert series where the Beatles opened for his band at the time, The Redcaps.

During the first show of the series, he said he received the best compliment of his life. George Harrison told him he liked his suit.

Such experiences have contributed to his well-established career, which is still blossoming.

“Dave is making a comeback in a big way,” Tsuru said.

The Dave Walker Band will be playing Aug. 15 at the Rockin’ the Rivers festival which will be near Three Forks in the Jefferson River Canyon.

This Friday the Dave Walker Band is playing a show near Livingston.

“I am in awe and obliged to them (my band) for their effort. They are the best of the best, the best musicians I have worked with,” Walker said.

http://www.madisoniannews.com/2010/0...virginia-city/
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Old 06-29-2010, 12:01 PM
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Alejandro Escovedo talks about songs on his album:

http://www.expressnightout.com/conte...iner-notes.php

Street Songs

I really love this song. First of all, it's very different than anything else on the record. I wanted to write a song very much like David Bowie's song "I'm Afraid of Americans." So I started writing that riff [hums riff], which reminded me very much of early Fleetwood Mac, when it was Jeremy Spencer, Peter Green and Danny Kirwan, so it was a real guitar-heavy thing. The lyrics really came from the residency that I did at the Continental Club in South Austin —Â I did two months there before we made the record. We'd bring three new songs every Tuesday night, present them to the audience acoustically, and then bring the band out and show the audience how we could arrange things. So those lyrics became about that part of town in Austin. Then as I was traveling ... I met someone who became part of that song also. There were all these parts — I had a lot to draw from. It became a little like "Walk on the Wild Side."
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Old 06-29-2010, 12:35 PM
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Out of respect, the story is Carlos Santana visited Peter Green while the band was recording "The Green Manalishi" in London, 4/70. He asked Peter Green's permission to cover "Black Magic Woman". The "black magic" came before in Munich, 3/70 on a tour of Europe. .
Santana's "BMW" was recorded & released in 1969, so that "story" of Carlos asking permission while FMac was recording "Green Manalishi" is bullsh**.

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The irony of this blog post is that Peter Green's special "tone" wasn't heard until he formed Fleetwood Mac. While the blogger lists examples of tone (he does give credit to playing, barely), from John Mayall's "A Hard Road", it's still a factory stock '59 Les Paul. At the very least, the neck pickup was missing. ks.
Really? Then what do you call "The Supernatural"??? Also, listen to tracks from the Deluxe Edition of A Hard Road...the "quack" was there on tracks like "Greeny", "Rubber Duck" & "Curly"...well, before Fleetwood Mac was formed.
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Last edited by chiliD : 06-29-2010 at 12:38 PM.
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Old 06-30-2010, 12:30 AM
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Santana's "BMW" was recorded & released in 1969, so that "story" of Carlos asking permission while FMac was recording "Green Manalishi" is bullsh**..
Sorry, "Abraxas" (including "Black Magic Woman") wasn't released until 9/70, four months after Peter Green left Fleetwood Mac. I didn't pull that anecdote from thin air, have you read the Christopher Hjort book on the British Blues movement? That book has been a godsend compiling media publications from the period, and pasting them together into a cohesive story about that great period from '65-'70 with Mayall, Cream, FM, Derek and the Dominoes, and the Stones.

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Really? Then what do you call "The Supernatural"??? Also, listen to tracks from the Deluxe Edition of A Hard Road...the "quack" was there on tracks like "Greeny", "Rubber Duck" & "Curly"...well, before Fleetwood Mac was formed.
I have the deluxe edition of "A Hard Road", and all the tracks you mention do not have that "tone". First off, "The Supernatural" was done in the fall of '66 as it was part of the original "AHR" album. Peter Green didn't have his pickup problem until at least late winter/early spring '67. You're confusing echo with "out of phase". "Greeny" to my ears is pure bridge tone, as are "Rubber Duck", & especially "Curly". "Curly" sounds like Jeff Beck so that immediately rules out "out of phase".


The second track from "Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac", play it now if you own it ("Merry Go Round")! That's is "THE TONE"! It's thin, and honky, there is no John Mayall song with Peter Green that has that tone.

BTW, why are you defending that blog? The guy was completely clueless. You of all people should've known that, or at least I thought you did. Now I wonder.
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Old 06-30-2010, 09:56 AM
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I wasn't defending anything....I'm more of a prosecutor.

Just yankin' yo' chain. I was just being "full o' crap". Just trying to get a response. "Let's see what happens if I jab with this stick" kinda thing.

Like the Monty Python skit: "Uh....I'd like to have an argument please...."

"No it isn't"

"Yes it is"

"No it isn't"

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c.1982 STEVIE NICKS HUGE 28 X 34 LARGE NEGATIVE GROUP RARE & UNUSUAL PHOTOS
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c.1982 STEVIE NICKS HUGE 28 X 34 LARGE NEGATIVE GROUP RARE & UNUSUAL PHOTOS pictureFleetwood Mac Signed Photo Stevie Nicks Mick Fleetwood Christie McVee John McVee
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Fleetwood Mac Signed Photo Stevie Nicks Mick Fleetwood Christie McVee John McVee picturevintage Stevie Nicks 1989 program and concert ticket other side of the mirror
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vintage Stevie Nicks 1989 program and concert ticket  other side of the mirror pictureFleetwood Mac Poster Album Promo Say You Will 2-Sided Stevie Nicks Mick
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Fleetwood Mac Poster Album Promo Say You Will 2-Sided Stevie Nicks Mick pictureStevie Nicks Poster Of Fleetwood Mac Time Space
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Stevie Nicks Poster Of Fleetwood Mac Time Space picture



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