The Ledge

Go Back   The Ledge > Main Forums > Chit Chat
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read


Make the Ads Go Away! Click here.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 03-26-2015, 02:13 PM
wetcamelfood wetcamelfood is offline
Addicted Ledgie
Supporting Ledgie
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Peabody, MA., USA
Posts: 2,048
Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Macfanforever View Post
It looks like fans rather see live shows then playing albums.
I wonder why that is? I'd much rather listen to an album myself.

John
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 03-26-2015, 02:57 PM
SisterNightroad's Avatar
SisterNightroad SisterNightroad is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Italy
Posts: 4,803
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wetcamelfood View Post
I wonder why that is? I'd much rather listen to an album myself.

John
Well, you get to share a little bond with the your favourite artist and the songs, the way they are played and how they changed through time, details about who wrote them and why...
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 03-26-2015, 03:07 PM
SisterNightroad's Avatar
SisterNightroad SisterNightroad is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Italy
Posts: 4,803
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Macfanforever View Post
Wow.Thats interesting.Thanks for sharing.

It looks like fans rather see live shows then playing albums.

I cant say to much about the current artists outings because I'm not a fan of any but this is one good reason that the Mac is doing so great with this tour and thanks to Chris returning and making it happen for them.

I hope the Mac will win the tour of the year at the end of the year with Pollstar and Billboard.
You're welcome!

Yes, I realized that fans rather see live shows then playing albums the last summer when I went seeing Aerosmith in Milan. They had released only 8 months prior their new album; I bought it for my best friend and it was very good, but the setlist had just two songs from their latest work and they played a brand new song never previously released and no one gave a ****, they only went crazy when they played the 80's hits, and in my opinion their 70's work is far better. People want to hear always the same old ****.

I'm glad for Fleetwood Mac too, but I don't think I'll ever see them live so all I have left is hope for a new album coming out.

Last edited by SisterNightroad : 03-26-2015 at 04:44 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 03-26-2015, 03:15 PM
SisterNightroad's Avatar
SisterNightroad SisterNightroad is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Italy
Posts: 4,803
Default

Why Has Las Vegas Become a Home for Classic Rock?
by Dave Lifton

For generations of music fans, Las Vegas has always been seen as the place where showbiz, the antithesis of rock, reigned supreme. But the past few years have seen a shift in that way of thinking, with bands now flocking to Sin City in the form of high-profile residencies. With Journey set to become the latest group to take the plunge, it seems like a good time as any to look at the reasons for this change.
Mostly, it’s the simple passage of time that’s caused the shift. As the stars who ruled Vegas for decades aged, fresh names were required to get tourists into shows. Because the idea of the all-around entertainer no longer existed, and acts with no track record outside of Vegas were meeting with diminishing returns, it made sense for the casinos to look for other musicians with decades of success behind them as live draws.
Much of the past stigma about Las Vegas being the place where acts go to die has faded,” says Tim Dressen, a Vegas enthusiast who, for 10 years, has hosted the popular Five Hundy by Midnight podcast. “If bands can play for fans who still love their music and make decent money doing it, the location probably doesn’t matter much. Vegas resorts are generally good at promoting live events, so tickets sell well, and the casinos booking these acts know that their fans are in their 30s, 40s and 50s. They’re likely to have some disposable income to spend not only on tickets, but on food, drinks, hotel rooms and gambling as well.
But why travel to Vegas to see a band when it will eventually make its way to your town? Dressen — who has seen numerous concerts on his travels to Vegas over the years, including Sammy Hagar, the Scorpions and U2 – notes that it creates a different mindset when you’ve traveled cross-country for a concert rather than to have the concert come to you. And when coupled with Vegas’s singular vibrancy, it becomes a special event rather than just an ordinary night out.
A lot of people are looking for an excuse to visit Las Vegas,” Dressen says. “And even if they’re going to Las Vegas mainly to see a band, the rest of the trip — the food, the gambling, the madness of the city — adds to the experience and makes it special.
A good portion of the recent classic-rock activity has centered on the Joint, a 4,000-seat concert venue located inside the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. Since February 2012, when Motley Crue sold out 12 shows in a two-and-a-half week stretch, the Joint has reached out to other hard rock bands. Def Leppard, Kiss and Guns N’ Roses all launched similar residencies to great success, with Motley Crue and GNR doing a second run of shows in 2013 and 2014, respectively.
While those bands can play to considerably more people on a nightly basis, Dressen notes that playing Vegas residencies offers musicians a chance to perform something besides the usual greatest-hits show.
Def Leppard did a top-to-bottom performance of Hysteria every weekend for three weeks,” Dressen says. “Fans didn’t get to see that particular show elsewhere because they didn’t tour it. There are rumors that they plan to do the same with Pyromania in 2016, so it must have worked out.” (Def Leppard and Guns N’ Roses have released DVDs of their Vegas shows, so fans who didn’t make it to one of them can now see them.)


Read More: Why Has Las Vegas Become a Home for Classic Rock? | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/las-v...ckback=tsmclip

Last edited by SisterNightroad : 03-27-2015 at 04:43 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 03-26-2015, 04:14 PM
Macfanforever's Avatar
Macfanforever Macfanforever is offline
Addicted Ledgie
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Wallyworld CT
Posts: 10,537
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SisterNightroad View Post
Why Has Las Vegas Become a Home for Classic Rock?
by Dave Lifton

For generations of music fans, Las Vegas has always been seen as the place where showbiz, the antithesis of rock, reigned supreme. But the past few years have seen a shift in that way of thinking, with bands now flocking to Sin City in the form of high-profile residencies. With Journey set to become the latest group to take the plunge, it seems like a good time as any to look at the reasons for this change.
Mostly, it’s the simple passage of time that’s caused the shift. As the stars who ruled Vegas for decades aged, fresh names were required to get tourists into shows. Because the idea of the all-around entertainer no longer existed, and acts with no track record outside of Vegas were meeting with diminishing returns, it made sense for the casinos to look for other musicians with decades of success behind them as live draws.
Much of the past stigma about Las Vegas being the place where acts go to die has faded,” says Tim Dressen, a Vegas enthusiast who, for 10 years, has hosted the popular Five Hundy by Midnight podcast. “If bands can play for fans who still love their music and make decent money doing it, the location probably doesn’t matter much. Vegas resorts are generally good at promoting live events, so tickets sell well, and the casinos booking these acts know that their fans are in their 30s, 40s and 50s. They’re likely to have some disposable income to spend not only on tickets, but on food, drinks, hotel rooms and gambling as well.
But why travel to Vegas to see a band when it will eventually make its way to your town? Dressen — who has seen numerous concerts on his travels to Vegas over the years, including Sammy Hagar, the Scorpions and U2 – notes that it creates a different mindset when you’ve traveled cross-country for a concert rather than to have the concert come to you. And when coupled with Vegas’s singular vibrancy, it becomes a special event rather than just an ordinary night out.
A lot of people are looking for an excuse to visit Las Vegas,” Dressen says. “And even if they’re going to Las Vegas mainly to see a band, the rest of the trip — the food, the gambling, the madness of the city — adds to the experience and makes it special.
A good portion of the recent classic-rock activity has centered on the Joint, a 4,000-seat concert venue located inside the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. Since February 2012, when Motley Crue sold out 12 shows in a two-and-a-half week stretch, the Joint has reached out to other hard rock bands. Def Leppard, Kiss and Guns N’ Roses all launched similar residencies to great success, with Motley Crue and GNR doing a second run of shows in 2013 and 2014, respectively.
While those bands can play to considerably more people on a nightly basis, Dressen notes that playing Vegas residencies offers musicians a chance to perform something besides the usual greatest-hits show.
Def Leppard did a top-to-bottom performance of Hysteria every weekend for three weeks,” Dressen says. “Fans didn’t get to see that particular show elsewhere because they didn’t tour it. There are rumors that they plan to do the same with Pyromania in 2016, so it must have worked out.” (Def Leppard and Guns N’ Roses have released DVDs of their Vegas shows, so fans who didn’t make it to one of them can now see them.)


Read More: Why Has Las Vegas Become a Home for Classic Rock? | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/las-v...ckback=tsmclip
It seem like everyone's sister or brother open up a theater there.Its like the classic country artist took over Branson MO years ago.

Maybe Mick should open up a theater restaurant on the mainland in Vegas.
__________________
Skip R........

Stevie fan forever and ever amen.......
the Wildheart at Edge of Seventeen and the Gypsy.....

My sweet Buttons .I love you. RIP 2009 to 08/24/2016

Last edited by Macfanforever : 03-26-2015 at 04:19 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 03-26-2015, 04:19 PM
SisterNightroad's Avatar
SisterNightroad SisterNightroad is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Italy
Posts: 4,803
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Macfanforever View Post
It seem like everyone's sister or brother open up a theater there.Its like the classic country artist took over Branson MO years ago.

Maybe Mick should open up a theater restaurant on the mainland in Vegas.
I'd like him to. Maybe then we would get a last live DVD of a Fleetwood Mac show...
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 03-26-2015, 04:37 PM
Macfanforever's Avatar
Macfanforever Macfanforever is offline
Addicted Ledgie
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Wallyworld CT
Posts: 10,537
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SisterNightroad View Post
You're welcome!

Yes, I realized that fans rather see live shows then playing albums the last summer when I went seeing Aerosmith in Milan. They had released only 8 months prior their new album I bought it for my best friend and it was very good, but the setlist had just two songs from their latest work and they played a brand new song never previously released and no one gave a ****, they only went crazy when they played the 80's hits, and in my opinion their 70's work far better. People want to hear always the same old ****.

I'm glad for Fleetwood Mac too, but I don't think I'll ever see them live so all I have left is hope for a new album coming out.
Yes Thats the thing.They just want to hear the hits from the past.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wetcamelfood View Post
I wonder why that is? I'd much rather listen to an album myself.

John
That a good question.I haven't been to many concerts of any other artists lately and rather stay home and listen to the radio or fire up the iPod or give the turntable a spin or play a tape or two .I know it sounds sad and lazy but the shows are too expensive .Probably in the last 10 years I've only seen two other people live which are Keith Urban and comic Lewis Black.

I think I'm done with FM touring this year so far .Who knows what Stevie will do with her break time from the tour.

I would like t hit the local casinos for some cheap shows in the summertime.
__________________
Skip R........

Stevie fan forever and ever amen.......
the Wildheart at Edge of Seventeen and the Gypsy.....

My sweet Buttons .I love you. RIP 2009 to 08/24/2016
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 03-27-2015, 05:14 AM
PenguinHead's Avatar
PenguinHead PenguinHead is offline
Addicted Ledgie
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 4,471
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wetcamelfood View Post
I wonder why that is? I'd much rather listen to an album myself.

John
Right on!

Isn't there incongruity in comparing live shows to records?

Live performances are fluid transitory events. Album are a stable art form.
__________________
Life passes before me like an unknown circumstance

Last edited by PenguinHead : 03-27-2015 at 05:40 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 04-05-2015, 12:21 PM
SisterNightroad's Avatar
SisterNightroad SisterNightroad is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Italy
Posts: 4,803
Default

Neil Young’s Pono Music Player Is Finally Available
by Michael Gallucci January 7, 2015 1:24 PM


More than two years after Neil Young unveiled his hi-def Pono music player on ‘The Late Show With David Letterman,’ deep-pocketed music fans can finally buy the thing.
Young announced the Pono back in October 2012 during an appearance on Letterman’s late-night show. A year came and went, and Young once again said his tiny yellow music player — which can play high-quality music files that the puny iPod can’t handle — would be on the way soon.
In March of last year, the product reached its Kickstarter goal in one day, and a pre-order date was all set.
Now, finally, the Pono is available. Or at least it will be on Monday. And as the Verge notes, it won’t be available everywhere — just 80 stores. And it’s not cheap. The price of owning a Pono is $399.
But wait, that’s not the end of it. What are you going to play on that expensive new music player? Probably not the MP3s you already own, since the player is equipped for hi-def files like FLAC (tech specs, if you’re interested: 24-bit 192kHz). You can still play your old MP3s, but chances are, you’ll want something a little better sounding than that.
You can convert what you already own, or as Young and Pono’s backers are hoping, you’ll go straight to their just-opened store to download high-quality audio files to fill your new tiny yellow player.
Seeing that albums are way pricier than their iTunes versions, stuffing the Pono can drain your budget in no time. Young’s ‘After the Gold Rush’ goes for $21.79. The Who‘s super-deluxe version of ‘Quadrophenia’ sells for $43.29. And AC/DC‘s new ‘Rock or Bust’ is a relative steal at $17.99, but still almost twice its iTunes’ cost. (Some individual songs are available for download, too.)
So why upgrade to an expensive portable music player as the rest of the world seems to be happy with just streaming their music? As Young explained to an audience at the CES electronics and technology show yesterday, ”I didn’t listen to music for the last 15 years because I hated the way it sounded, and it made me pissed off and I couldn’t enjoy it any more. I could only hear what was missing.
He’s hoping there are music fans out there who feel the same way and, more importantly, are willing to pay for the privilege of hearing what they’ve been missing.


Read More: Neil Young's Pono Music Player Is Finally Available | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/neil-...ckback=tsmclip
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 04-22-2015, 05:24 AM
SisterNightroad's Avatar
SisterNightroad SisterNightroad is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Italy
Posts: 4,803
Default so cool...

Tom Petty on Hi-Res Audio

Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 05-03-2015, 02:10 PM
SisterNightroad's Avatar
SisterNightroad SisterNightroad is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Italy
Posts: 4,803
Default

Roger Waters ‘Angry’ Over State of Music Industry: ‘It’s Just Stealing!’
by Dave Lifton May 3, 2015 9:50 AM

The difficulties that younger musicians are facing in trying to make a living these days have not gone unnoticed by the generations that came before them. In a new interview, Roger Waters lashed out at the people who have created the technology that has resulted in putting less money in the hands of artists.

Speaking to the Times, the former Pink Floyd bassist calls himself “enormously privileged to have been born in 1943 and not 1983, to have been around when there was a music business and the takeover of Silicon Valley hadn’t happened and, in consequence, you could still make a living writing and recording songs and playing them to people.
And while Waters admits that the diminishing sales of recordsdoesn’t change my life in any way,” he is still “angry” at “this gallery of rogues and thieves [who interject] themselves between the people who aspire to be creative and their potential audience and steal every f—ing cent anybody ever made and put it in their pockets to buy f—ing huge mega-yachts and Gulfstream Fives with. These…thieves! It’s just stealing! And that they’re allowed to get away with it is just incredible.

However, Waters also does save some of his ire for the audience, who have taken full advantage of the technology. “I blame the punters as well to some extent,” he continues, “a whole generation that’s grown up who believe that music should be free. I mean why not make everything free? Then you could walk into a shop and say ‘I like that television’ and you walk out with it. No! Somebody made that and you have to buy it! ‘Oh, I’ll just pick up few apples.’ No! Some farmer grew those and brought them here to be sold!

Waters’ words echo those spoken by Paul Stanley and Gene Simmons of Kiss to Billboard last week. “I think we’re very fortunate to have come out when we did, and to not be relying upon an industry that has basically committed suicide,” Stanley said.
It’s really sad for the new artists. Where’s the next Elvis [Presley], where’s the next Beatles, where’s the [Led] Zeppelin? They’re out there but they don’t have a chance […] What are they gonna do? Give away their music for free? They’re gonna be living in their mom’s basement, unfortunately, and they’re never gonna get the chance that we did which is the saddest part of all for the new bands because there should always be a new generation of bands.



Read More: Roger Waters ‘Angry’ Over State of Music Industry: ‘It’s Just Stealing!’ | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/roger...ckback=tsmclip

Last edited by SisterNightroad : 03-02-2017 at 08:40 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 03-02-2017, 08:41 AM
SisterNightroad's Avatar
SisterNightroad SisterNightroad is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Italy
Posts: 4,803
Default

'It's a big gamble': Record stores sound off on Sunrise's HMV takeover

Record stores across the country are hopeful Sunrise Records' HMV takeover will work out, but experience has left them skeptical about the big move.

Toronto's Sunrise announced last week it will be taking over 70 HMV stores in malls across the country, with the aim of having them up and running by midsummer and turning a profit by next year.

If it works, it's a boon for the industry, said Spencer Destun. But he's got his reservations. Destun runs the last surviving Sam the Record Man location at Belleville, Ont.'s Quinte Mall. Since opening in 1979, he said, he has seen about eight or 10 chains come and go and his store is all that's left of Sam the Record Man.

"It's very tough to operate a store in a profitable manner today because the market is shrinking," he said.

"I can't even imagine the amount of organization and work that's going to take. Thank God they have some experience in the marketplace."

Sunrise currently has 10 locations in suburban Toronto and rural Ontario. Destun said he can't think of another instance in any industry where a business has tried to "tenfold their increase."

"If they succeed, it's good for everybody it speaks for the health of the industry."

Vinyl the 'bread and butter'

In an interview with CBC News, Sunrise president Doug Putman touted vinyl's "huge potential" and said it would be at the front of the reopened stores.

Jonathan Boudreau, who works at Taz Records in downtown Halifax, thinks that's a smart move. He said vinyl is a bigger seller for Taz than CDs. "It's definitely our bread and butter."

But it can be a fickle industry, something Boudreau knows first-hand.

He has been working in record stores for 17 years since he was 14. With the exception of Taz Records, every store he's worked in has closed. During that time, music technologies and trends have come and gone, taking stores with them.

"You never want to see a business close," he said, wishing Sunrise luck. "The rising tide floats all the boats."

Ben Frith thinks the transition will be tricky. He is the manager of Vancouver's Neptoon Records, his father's shop, where he has worked since he was a child.

"It's hard enough to get one store up and running smoothly, let alone 70 all at once," Frith said. "In this day and age, it seems insane."

Frith said that if Sunrise is to survive, it has to do something different from HMV.

He thinks HMV failed because it decided to stray from music in favour of selling other types of merchandise. Even with a vinyl push, Sunrise is still planning to sell CDs, apparel, merchandise and board games.

Frith's advice for the company is to focus on music and make sure it listens to what local customer bases want.

"If you sit and control something from an office for a whole country, it's not going to work."

'Far from a lost cause'

Although there have been doom-and-gloom stories about struggling music stores, Frith said "it's definitely far from a lost cause," particularly when it comes to vinyl.

A telling sign has been the shoppers coming into Neptoon buying classic, older records that never used to sell but are becoming popular again, like Fleetwood Mac's Rumours.

"It just blows our mind that this record we could barely give away a few years ago, people are paying $30 for now for a reissue." He said they'll sell up to 10 copies of the record on a busy day.

It's why Mark Poppen started his online record store Funky Moose Records in the summer of 2015. He noticed there was a demand and had always liked collecting records, so he started selling them online from his home in Bellevue, Sask. He now has customers from all over Canada and may open a physical retail store one day.

"It's a good thing for the whole vinyl industry," he said of the takeover.

"It's a big gamble I hope they can pull it off."



https://ca.news.yahoo.com/big-gamble...100000924.html
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:09 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 1995-2003 Martin and Lisa Adelson, All Rights Reserved