The Ledge

Go Back   The Ledge > Main Forums > Stevie Nicks
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read


Make the Ads Go Away! Click here.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 06-05-2009, 01:45 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
Addicted Ledgie
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: California
Posts: 24,685
Default

Boston Herald, The Edge, June 5, 2009

http://www.bostonherald.com/entertai...Gotta_love_it/

The latest from the dreamy Fleetwood Mac songstress and solo star is a combination CD/DVD recorded live in Chicago that proves the rock goddess has plenty of mojo left. The solo and Mac hits are here, along with some unexpected gems such as duets “The One” and “Circle Dance” with Vanessa Carlton. Stevie can still rock and twirl with the best of them.

- LAUREN CARTER
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 06-26-2009, 07:41 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
Addicted Ledgie
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: California
Posts: 24,685
Default

Fort Smith Southwest Times Record Online, June 26, 2009

http://www.swtimes.com/articles/2009...s062609_02.txt

Nicks Nixes Critics

Routinely criticized for her lowering vocal pitch and alleged inconsistent stage presence, rock gypsy Steve Nicks has bounced back in recent months.

The 61-year-old vocalist and songwriter is impressing on Fleetwood Mac’s current “Unleashed Tour” — she and guitar guru Lindsey Buckingham were the uncontested highlights of the group’s Tulsa show on May 3 — and she’s equally inspired on her new solo concert DVD, “Live in Chicago.” Of course Nicks’ solo guitarist, Waddy Wachtel, isn’t Buckingham on six strings (really, which living guitarist is?), but he makes an efficient bandleader and noble instrumentalist.

More impressive throughout the DVD is Nicks, who seems to be happy to inject added passion into her 1983 solo smash, “Stand Back,” and then turning around and doing a near-great tribute to Dave Matthews Band by reinterpreting their “Crash Into Me.” This seamless switch proves that Nicks is more versatile than much of the world thinks.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 06-28-2009, 05:33 AM
Nikolaj Nikolaj is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 1,035
Default

she and guitar guru Lindsey Buckingham were the uncontested highlights of the group’s Tulsa show on May 3 —

Gosh, how relieved Stevie and Lindsey must be that their drummer and bassist weren't the highlights of the concert!
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 06-28-2009, 02:43 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
Addicted Ledgie
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: California
Posts: 24,685
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikolaj View Post
she and guitar guru Lindsey Buckingham were the uncontested highlights of the group’s Tulsa show on May 3 —

Gosh, how relieved Stevie and Lindsey must be that their drummer and bassist weren't the highlights of the concert!
I disagree that it was uncontested. John was changing his vest every other song, raising his guitar over his head and yelling like a banshee, trying to compete with them.

Michele
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 07-31-2009, 02:28 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
Addicted Ledgie
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: California
Posts: 24,685
Default

Popmatters , by Christian John Wikane

http://www.popmatters.com/pm/review/...tage-sessions/

Stevie Nicks
The Soundstage Sessions
(Reprise)

I miss new albums by Stevie Nicks. Tearing the plastic off a Stevie Nicks record that contains completely unknown material is a thrill that listeners have only truly experienced six times since her 1981 solo debut, Bella Donna. Compilations occasionally fill those long gaps with a new song here and there, but they do not summon the same charge as a whole set of songs that Nicks is introducing for the first time.

Scanning the track list of The Soundstage Sessions, portions of a concert Nicks recorded in October 2007 for the PBS Soundstage program, there are eight titles familiar to anyone with a cursory knowledge of Nicks or Fleetwood Mac, plus a cover of “Crash” by Dave Matthews Band and Bonnie Raitt’s “Circle Dance”, which Nicks sings with Vanessa Carlton (a misstep). How does it all add up?

First, irrespective of current record sales, Nicks has every reason to record a new album. She has a wealth of material and her voice remains a uniquely expressive instrument. Whatever the record label prognosticators may argue, there is a demand for a Stevie Nicks album that doesn’t include “Stand Back” or “Landslide” for the umpteenth time. The Soundstage Sessions has both but, to its credit, it also includes gems like “How Still My Love” and “Fall From Grace”, songs that have not yet been tossed into the compilation spin cycle. Disregarding the missed opportunity of a new Stevie Nicks album, The Soundstage Sessions is mostly satisfying. Nicks sounds damn good on all of these tracks, even if the world did not necessarily need another version of “Landslide”.

The set opens energetically with “Stand Back”, where Nicks stridently attacks the words. However many thousands of times she’s sung this song, she treats it in a fresh way here, combining her phrasing on the original recording with some inflections known only to a live audience. Under the musical direction of renowned guitarist Waddy Wachtel, the attributes of the original synthesizer melody line featured on The Wild Heart (1983) are also intact, maintaining a charming early-’80s quality.

Just as compelling, but in a completely different milieu, is “Sara”. The 1979 version off Fleetwood Mac’s Tusk was macerated in an ethereal atmosphere, which is not a quality that is easily translated live. The band trades tropospheric ambience for earthy, acoustic warmth. Nicks conveys both the romance and ache in the 30-year-old song lyrics with deeper, more resonant vocal textures than her younger self. “All I ever wanted was to know that you were dreaming,” she sings, soaring above the extended arrangement. The set of lyrics following that line, which were barely audible as the song faded on Tusk, are consummated here, telling the whole story of “Sara”. The Soundstage Sessions is essential listening if only for this one especially notable ingredient. It induces goosebumps.

Digging deep into her library of songs, Nicks updates “How Still My Love” with a similarly bravura performance. Despite appearing on Bella Donna, “How Still My Love” was only recently incorporated back into her concert sets. The live reworking actually improves upon the song’s more familiar incarnation and suits Nicks better now than 28 years ago. The song runs twice the length of the studio version, giving the intensity more space to build. The duskiness of the track mirrors the huskiness in her voice and climaxes when she unleashes a guttural belt midway through the song.

Guttural through and through, “Fall From Grace” casts Stevie Nicks in a voltaic light. She is at her rock-and-roll best. On the showstopper from Trouble in Shangri-La (2001), Nicks flawlessly transports the searing fervency of the album version to the stage and breathlessly keeps pace with the band. Her performance gives ample proof that some of Nicks’ best songs never made it to the radio, and it should convince the powers at Reprise that investing in a new album could yield more such modern classics.

180 degrees removed from the unhinged virtues of “Fall From Grace” is a faithful restating of “Beauty and the Beast”, which closed The Wild Heart. Lost in the rapture of her lyrics, Nicks captivates for seven minutes. Accompanied by just strings, piano, and her background vocalists, she draws strength from private, unseen sources. She dubs her performance “the Witherspoon vocal” after a woman who attended the recording of the song in Nashville (apparently not on the same occasion as the rest of The Soundstage Sessions). Whatever the root of inspiration, it elevates Nicks to a whole other plateau of singing.

Performances like “Beauty and the Beast” render The Soundstage Sessions a collection of mostly well-executed selections. It may not be the long-overdue studio album listeners are awaiting, but it attests, with potent conviction, to the powerful, enduring presence of Stevie Nicks.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 08-04-2018, 09:00 AM
SisterNightroad's Avatar
SisterNightroad SisterNightroad is online now
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Italy
Posts: 5,201
Default

Marcia Barrett: My six best albums

Marcia Barrett, 69, was a singer with Boney M whose hits include Daddy Cool, Ma Baker and Rasputin. Her memoir Forward: My Life With And Without Boney M (Constable, £20) is out now.

MILES DAVIS: Decoy (Import)

Beautiful, relaxing music. I’m lucky my husband Marcus likes this too. It’s good in the background when you’re talking with your love. I got into jazz when I met Marcus, who is a musician. He took me to Ronnie Scott’s when I was ill [with cancer] in 1998. It was so nice.

KENNY ROGERS: The Heart Of The Matter (Import)

This is 100 per cent love songs and he’s got a fantastic voice. He did one called Lady, not on this album, which we waltzed to at our wedding in 1984.

I don’t like sad songs where tears are rolling down my cheeks. I want to feel good where my heart is full. Kenny does that to me.

BOB MARLEY & THE WAILERS: Natty Dread (Universal/Island)

The highest craftsmanship of pure reggae. It includes one of my favourite songs, No Woman, No Cry which Boney M covered. I still tour with the Boney M songs and I sing it every night which always goes down really well. It is very moving and being a Jamaican I understand all the patois. I left Jamaica at 13 but you don’t forget your roots.

STEVIE NICKS: The Soundstage Sessions (Warner) A songstress who knows how to portray the lovely songs she sings – she’s cool, to the point, quite sexy.

I find her fascinating, with that unusual voice.


THE KINKS: You Really Got Me – The Best Of (Sanctuary)

When I was at school, these guys came along singing You Really Got Me. It was different, cheeky with Cockney accents. They were fantastic. Enjoyable pop songs that take me down the memory lane of enjoyable school days. Anything British back then was my bag.

JOSé FELICIANO: The Album (Black Line)

Maximum enjoyment. I love the rhythmic Latin style. Anything for dancing. You can have it down low when you’re having supper then it can lead you into anything, especially after a cocktail!


https://www.express.co.uk/entertainm...b-marley-kinks
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 1995-2003 Martin and Lisa Adelson, All Rights Reserved