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  #16  
Old 01-04-2013, 03:43 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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[Liked this Onion-style rambling]

Death and Taxes, January 4, 2013

http://www.deathandtaxesmag.com/1929...-says-blogger/

‘Rumors’ era Fleetwood Mac still totally ‘the jam’, says blogger
By Ned Hepburn 2 hours ago

There are reports coming from just outside of Park Slope, Brooklyn, that “Rumors”-era Fleetwood Mac still totally kicks ass. This rediscovery allegedly took place during what some are calling a “slow news day” when there was little else to report on, other than that whole fiscal cliff/ debt limit thing, but to be honest we don’t know a lot about that sort of thing and couldn’t be bothered to read more than a few words before giving up and wondering how we managed to eat an entire sleeve of cookies in one sitting.

“‘Dreams’ is still ****ing great,” said handsome, rich, and modest blogger Ned Hepburn, “I mean, the whole album is really good. Nobody has put out an album like this in forever. This **** has ‘Go Your Own Way’ on it AND ‘The Chain’ on it. Did you know ‘The Chain’ is the only song of theirs credited to all five members?” Hepburn then offered his opinion on Fleetwood Mac vocalist and songwriter Stevie Nicks, saying “And Stevie Nicks used to be pretty banging, too. Her solo career wasn’t exactly terrible but everyone peaked at ‘Rumors’, man.” Immediately after making these statements he microwaved some Bagel Bites™ like an adult because that is what adults eat. He then closed his bedroom door and was not available for further comment.
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  #17  
Old 01-05-2013, 02:45 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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A Millennial Stands Up For Fleetwood Mac

Nicky Smith, Splice Today, January 4, 2013


Slough off the disdain of Boomers and listen to Rumours.

The greatness of Fleetwood Mac is not in dispute. Listen not to your Baby Boom elders who slogged and maybe suffered through the summers of the late-1970s when Rumours and Tusk owned the radio and filled arenas and stadiums. Their burden is great, having grown up in the late-60s when a chilly November could see the release of The White Album, Beggars Banquet, and Song Cycle all in the same week, and new heroes were on television and subverting a constricting culture based on conformity and shame right before your eyes. Everyone knows popular music since the 60s has existed in the shadow of it: everyone is influenced by the Beatles but no one will ever top them, so they say. I’m a Millennial, and finding our own musical heroes is tough in an era when few truly righteous bands or artists attain mass popularity and are able to headline arenas and make multi-million-dollar albums. That stuff’s reserved for pop lip-synchers, meme-generators, and porn stars these days.

Maybe that’s why the music of Fleetwood Mac is seeing such a strong surge in interest among the Millennials. A friend made a good point: “Don’t Stop” is embedded in the consciousness of 90s kids from the ’92 and ’96 Clinton campaigns, so the sound has been in our heads even if we didn’t know the material well. But stymied by dismissive dads who saw Fleetwood Mac as what the Ramones were fighting against, it’s taken until our early 20s to discover how amazing this band is. Brilliant popsmiths composing ecstatic, emotionally potent music with an extracurricular soap opera going on between members, and constant back and forth dialogues in the ****ing songs. It’s fascinating to watch Stevie seethe when she sings Buckingham’s nasty riposte “Go Your Own Way,” or John McVie’s cringing during “You Make Loving Fun.” Speaking of which, check out this amazing performance of the Christine McVie song from 1977 here:

Everything about this song is glorious and ecstatic: the Gm-F-Eb chord structure and McVie’s rich, husky vocals are the sound of total trust and infatuation. Rumours might be the most optimistic record of all time. The sound is isn’t just reassuring, it’s victorious. It’s the sound of love bursting in every direction and the feeling you get in your gut sometimes thinking about your partner, your family, your friends, a deeply satisfying drip of oxytocin in your brain that reminds you of being in the womb. It’s every triumphant and peaceful experience you’ve ever had. Buckingham’s lead vocal around 3:48 is raucous and incredibly moving, delirious glee with this feeling of earthly satisfaction and incredible luck at getting this person into your life. This is just how I received “You Make Loving Fun” on first listen, unaware of Rumours as anything other than an album that sold really well, like an REO Speedwagon or Asia record. The ubiquity of those mid-late 70s albums in millions of kids’ homes in the 80s and 90s may have turned off as many as they turned on, but having been underexposed all my life, I only now understand how Rumours could be one the most popular albums ever: it’s the human ideal, mushy love, understanding, forgiveness. It transcends schmaltz into the heavens.

—Follow Nicky Smith on Twitter: @MUGGER1992
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  #18  
Old 01-18-2013, 01:07 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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4 out of 5 stars by Bernard Zuel, The Sydney Morning Herald,
January 19, 2013

http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/...117-2cudi.html

Approaching the 35-year-old Rumours fresh is nigh on impossible unless perhaps you have grown up in a yurt outside Ulan Bator. Even then, I bet Stevie Nicks's voice has wafted across the steppes singing ''but listen carefully to the sound of your loneliness/like a heartbeat, drives you mad'' and many a discussion has been had over a steaming glass of horse milk on the vexed question of whether Lindsey Buckingham was out of line with his crack about ''packing up, shacking up is all you want to do''.

This 1977 mega-seller is the quintessential mid-'70s pop of an indulgent Los Angeles as well as the clinching argument for the truism that if you start a relationship with a band member, make sure it's not one who can write a song about you. Since we all know the songs and the backstory, we can't come without prejudice to the remastered edition, now variously packaged with B-sides, rarities, a live disc, vinyl and a documentary on DVD.

Still, you could start by looking at the album through something other than the prism of the Nicks/Buckingham songs, giving more attention to the subtle playing of Mick Fleetwood and John McVie but especially to the songs of the too easily forgotten, quiet/not bitter one, Christine McVie.


Quintessential mid-'70s pop ... Rumours by Fleetwood Mac.

Buckingham's Second Hand News kicks off the album with a buoyant rhythm and a little randiness. McVie's You Make Loving Fun has an equally sensual subtext, a compulsive little groove from that rhythm section and energy breaking out of the pillow-soft harmonies via a cracking Buckingham guitar line.

If Buckingham's blue-sky Go Your Own Way feels like an encapsulation of driving some long road in the '70s, then McVie's Don't Stop seems tailor-made for a confident strut in flares, wide lapels and a lot of hair. And as sadly resigned and yet lushly appealing as Nicks's Dreams is, there's nothing on Rumours near as quietly beautiful and happily melancholic as McVie's Songbird.

If you're already sold on the album, you may be wondering if it's worth getting the extras. Although it has some decent crunch at times and includes Rhiannon, Nicks's hit from Rumours' self-titled predecessor, I don't think much is to be gained from the live disc. For committed fans, there are more rewards in the rarities/demo material. The demo of The Chain has an eerie, foreboding element to it that suggests it could have been a completely different song; likewise an early version of Silver Springs is lower, less optimistic and intriguing. And for those who doubted at the time, Nicks's compelling and stark Planets of the Universe - a demo not released until 2004 - will convince you there was a lot more than scarves and witchy stuff going on there.



FLEETWOOD MAC


Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/...#ixzz2ILrgpV9C
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  #19  
Old 01-24-2013, 08:25 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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Female First, January 24, 2013
http://www.femalefirst.co.uk/music/f...ac-276608.html
Fleetwood Mac - A Look Back At Rumours

Fleetwood Mac’s landmark album ‘Rumours’ gets re-released next week, and we thought we’d look back at the album to figure out just why it’s so revered throughout the musical community, to the point that it even got its own episode of Glee dedicated to it.

Many albums have a difficult start in life, but Rumours might just be one of the most tumultuous productions ever to pull through the difficulty and pull out the other side. The production of the album was so filled with problems during production it’s a miracle that it even got made, let alone became the unifying factor that would keep the band together for years to come.

Fleetwood Mac was a band built on relationships, with not one, but two couples in the five person group. 1977 though saw both partnerships break down though, with bassist John McVie and keyboardist Christine McVie filing for divorce and vocalist Stevie Nicks leaving guitarist Lindsay Buckingham for the arms of drummer Mick Fleetwood.

The sessions were filled with spite and malice, with the band hardly talking to each other between takes of songs that unsubtly had each of the band members washing their dirty laundry right in front of those that had caused the grievances. With the band also falling ill of the vices of success, it lead to many a wasted session and drew divisions between the members.

Despite these cracks so big they can still be seen from space, Rumours is without question not only the best album that Fleetwood Mac would ever make, but one of the best albums of both the decade and, to many, the century.

The band’s ability to cycle their vocalists not only makes Rumours a wonderful varied album on the ear, but also lets each band member to exercise their demons publically, one after the other.

To this day, Rumours is a time defying record, one filled with personal grief, spite and celebration all wrapped up in a instrument package so incredibly inviting that it makes many of the songs anthemic. From the tortured Go Your Own Way, heart-breaking Dreams to The Chain containing one of the famous guitar riffs in music history, Rumours is filled with some of the most iconic moments out of a decade’s worth of music.

It’s an album that contains nearly all of the best Fleetwood Mac songs, classics that are engrained onto the public subconscious in ways that you might not even know. Only Landslide isn’t present out of the truly great songs by the band, with Rumours providing the best education possible as to why the world suddenly fell in love with the group.

The album has been easily the most successful record that Fleetwood Mac ever released, with the album currently the sixth highest album of all time in America and having sold over 40 million copies worldwide by 2009. Needless to say, it’s the album that took Fleetwood Mac from a just an American sensation to a worldwide phenomenon, but has remained a gauntlet the band hasn’t been able to better in the 35 years that have passed since its release.

For those of you out there that are yet to experience the brilliance of Rumours, just do yourself a massive favour, set aside 40 minutes and listen to Rumours from start to finish. Still as engaging, emotional and foot-tapping as it was when it first launched all those years ago, it’s a truly magnificent record that’s more than worthy of your attention.

Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours is released once again this Monday.

FemaleFirst Cameron Smith
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  #20  
Old 01-27-2013, 02:49 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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The Telegraph, January 27, 2013 by James Lachno

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/m...l-love-it.html

Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours: Why the under-30s still love it
Ahead of the release of a special boxset edition of the Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours, James Lachno argues that the 1977 album has survived better than its punk rivals.

This Monday, a three-disc, 35th anniversary boxset of Fleetwood Mac’s 1977 masterpiece Rumours will be released. There’s never been a better time to celebrate the band and their gorgeous 11th album, both of which are more popular and fashionable than ever.

For many music fans in their mid twenties, Rumours has been the soundtrack to large portions of our lives. During my childhood, it used to initiate a brief ceasefire between me and my sister as we squabbled during long car journeys, and in my teens, Songbird often featured on the giddily romantic mix CDs I made for girlfriends. Recently, Go Your Own Way and The Chain – better known as the BBC's Formula One theme tune – have become 2am favourites for bleary-eyed twentysomethings desperate to keep a house party going. By contrast, pioneering punk hits released in the same year such as God Save the Queen and White Riot never seem to get a look in.


But why is Rumours so beloved among my generation? Its resilient popularity is, of course, in part due to the timeless quality of the music, which is warm and sweetly melodic, with coruscating harmonies, breezy rhythms, and virtuoso guitar flourishes. By 1977, Fleetwood Mac had had almost a decade to hone their songcraft, via several line-up changes and subtle changes in style, and Rumours shows a band at the pinnacle of their pop powers. It’s an album that’s chock-full of potential singles, all lushly produced to create an almost faultless, glossy soft-rock sound. It’s sold 40 million copies worldwide, making it one of the bestselling albums of all time, and everyone from family pop quartet The Corrs to Californian hardcore band NOFX have covered its songs. All of this is testament to its broad appeal.

But there’s more to it than that: right now the hippest bands around all want to sound like Fleetwood Mac. What started in the late-2000s with US folk-rock revivalists such as Fleet Foxes and Bon Iver has built up a head of steam. Last year saw the release of fine albums from trendy US acts such as Best Coast and Sharon Von Etten that bore the unmistakable influence of Fleetwood Mac’s classic Seventies period, as did work from blockbuster pop artists Mumford and Sons and Taylor Swift. Barely a cigarette paper, meanwhile, can separate the sound of Stevie Nicks’s songs from Rumours and those of the BBC's feted Sound Of 2013 poll winners, Haim.

Where a decade or so ago the success of New Yorkers The Strokes and British quartet The Libertines led young music fans to devour the visceral debuts released during 1977’s punk explosion – from Television to The Clash – the resurgence in hook-laden guitar-pop has led us back to Rumours.

My generation, meanwhile, can enjoy the album without any of the baggage. We weren’t born until a decade after it came out, and didn’t live through the punk tribalism of the late-Seventies that would have made it so uncool to be the fan of such a “safe” album.

For us, Rumours stands out for its artistic merits. We love it for its easy hooks, and its raw emotion – real stories of love, heartbreak and despair that still resonate. Whether we’re aware of the dysfunctional partner-swapping, cocaine binges and paranoid atmosphere that provided the backdrop to the album’s recording sessions in 1976 is irrelevant. Anguished, vulnerable and embittered lines such as “players only love you when they’re playing” from Dreams will always strike an emotional chord.

Fleetwood Mac will tour for the first time since 2009 later this year, and a headline slot at Glastonbury would have offered a fitting opportunity for my friends and me to toast their current popularity. Much to our disappointment, however, the band's US tour commitments have cruelly ruled out an appearance at the UK festival, leaving us with nothing but Rumours – and those wee-hours party playlists.


Rumours 35th Anniversary 3CD Deluxe Edition boxset is released on Monday, January 28
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  #21  
Old 01-27-2013, 02:51 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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The Oxford, by Oliver Hancock, January 27, 2013
http://oxfordstudent.com/2013/01/27/...-macs-rumours/


Back with Second Hand News: Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours

I remember reading an issue of Rolling Stone a few years ago about the ‘100 Greatest Albums of All Time’, and thinking about how these countdowns might differ in different magazines – NME’s top 10 will almost certainly not be the same as Kerrang’s.

Getting down to the top 10, all the usual candidates I would expect in modern music magazines were there (The Beatles, Stones, Dylan etc.), but the number 4 on the list was an album I’d never really heard of: Rumours by Fleetwood Mac. I wondered how an album considered canonical by one of the world’s biggest music magazines could have passed me by; why all the ‘Top 100…’ articles I’d read in British magazines could have ignored Rumours in the top bracket. The album itself was popular and critically acclaimed on both sides of the Atlantic, unsurprising given the Anglo-American core of the band, and yet an avid reader of British music magazines in the 21st-century might never consider Fleetwood Mac’s seminal LP in the same bracket as many of the well-trodden ‘classic’ albums.

This has the chance to change with the impending re-release of Rumours, more than 25 years after its original release. Whether milking a cash-cow or hoping to disseminate their work to a new, younger audience, there is a sense that such an album is coming at the right time. The musicianship of the songs forms an interesting juxtaposition to the works of many of today’s new breed of guitar bands (From The Vaccines to Palma Violets), and, despite the recordings having inevitably aged, the songs themselves remain just as potent as they did in the 1970s.

When looking back upon the process of its recording, it is hard to fathom that such cohesive, well-written pop songs coincided with a time when the relationships in the band were falling apart; songs like the Nicks-penned ‘Dreams’ and Buckingham’s ‘Go Your Own Way’ even seem a direct discourse, the ‘unfurled back and forth’ Buckingham would later recall in ‘Eyes of the World’. Yet in such a capable group of musicians and songwriters, the talent will always out, and a real ear for melody and intelligently crafted lyrics interact in such a way that can seldom be accidental.

Despite a deceptive amount of experimentation, there is always a sense, simply, that each addition works; the driving rhythm of ‘Second Hand News’, made by McVie hitting his drum stool, the explosive coda of ‘The Chain’, the only song written by all five bandmates, and the now iconic ‘Go Your Own Way’, a song that was nearly scrapped as a single for having ‘no real beat’. Each song knows what it is doing and does it well- every addition stands alone as much as forms part of the album’s overall dynamic.

One could argue that such a mode of song-writing has been lost in recent guitar bands, and the next generation of NME bands could do worse than get themselves a copy of Fleetwood Mac’s best LP. The creative harmonic interchange in songs like ‘Second Hand News’ and ‘I Don’t Wanna Know’ shows that a use of familiar modular chords can still avoid sounding dull and derivative (something that bands like Tribes and The Vaccines have yet to learn). There can be many discussions about what makes a classic album, but for sheer song-writing talent, Rumours deserves its place amongst the greats.

Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours is out on reissue from 29th January published by Rhino Records.
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  #22  
Old 01-27-2013, 03:04 PM
Dragonfly Dragonfly is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michelej1 View Post
The Oxford, by Oliver Hancock, January 27, 2013
http://oxfordstudent.com/2013/01/27/...-macs-rumours/


Back with Second Hand News: Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours

I remember reading an issue of Rolling Stone a few years ago about the ‘100 Greatest Albums of All Time’, and thinking about how these countdowns might differ in different magazines – NME’s top 10 will almost certainly not be the same as Kerrang’s.

Getting down to the top 10, all the usual candidates I would expect in modern music magazines were there (The Beatles, Stones, Dylan etc.), but the number 4 on the list was an album I’d never really heard of: Rumours by Fleetwood Mac. I wondered how an album considered canonical by one of the world’s biggest music magazines could have passed me by; why all the ‘Top 100…’ articles I’d read in British magazines could have ignored Rumours in the top bracket. The album itself was popular and critically acclaimed on both sides of the Atlantic, unsurprising given the Anglo-American core of the band, and yet an avid reader of British music magazines in the 21st-century might never consider Fleetwood Mac’s seminal LP in the same bracket as many of the well-trodden ‘classic’ albums.

This has the chance to change with the impending re-release of Rumours, more than 25 years after its original release. Whether milking a cash-cow or hoping to disseminate their work to a new, younger audience, there is a sense that such an album is coming at the right time. The musicianship of the songs forms an interesting juxtaposition to the works of many of today’s new breed of guitar bands (From The Vaccines to Palma Violets), and, despite the recordings having inevitably aged, the songs themselves remain just as potent as they did in the 1970s.

When looking back upon the process of its recording, it is hard to fathom that such cohesive, well-written pop songs coincided with a time when the relationships in the band were falling apart; songs like the Nicks-penned ‘Dreams’ and Buckingham’s ‘Go Your Own Way’ even seem a direct discourse, the ‘unfurled back and forth’ Buckingham would later recall in ‘Eyes of the World’. Yet in such a capable group of musicians and songwriters, the talent will always out, and a real ear for melody and intelligently crafted lyrics interact in such a way that can seldom be accidental.

Despite a deceptive amount of experimentation, there is always a sense, simply, that each addition works; the driving rhythm of ‘Second Hand News’, made by McVie hitting his drum stool, the explosive coda of ‘The Chain’, the only song written by all five bandmates, and the now iconic ‘Go Your Own Way’, a song that was nearly scrapped as a single for having ‘no real beat’. Each song knows what it is doing and does it well- every addition stands alone as much as forms part of the album’s overall dynamic.

One could argue that such a mode of song-writing has been lost in recent guitar bands, and the next generation of NME bands could do worse than get themselves a copy of Fleetwood Mac’s best LP. The creative harmonic interchange in songs like ‘Second Hand News’ and ‘I Don’t Wanna Know’ shows that a use of familiar modular chords can still avoid sounding dull and derivative (something that bands like Tribes and The Vaccines have yet to learn). There can be many discussions about what makes a classic album, but for sheer song-writing talent, Rumours deserves its place amongst the greats.

Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours is out on reissue from 29th January published by Rhino Records.
Great review

Here in the UK the critics have always been a bit lukewarm about this line-up of the band (maybe because some still can't see past the Peter Green era) but I've noticed them getting a really good press lately.

The Daily Express and Daily Mail (not that I buy either but did flick through them) gave the re-issue 5 stars and were very complimentary about them in general.
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  #23  
Old 01-27-2013, 03:37 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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The Daily Express and Daily Mail (not that I buy either but did flick through them) gave the re-issue 5 stars and were very complimentary about them in general.
Oh, your post reminded me to go check out their websites. Thank you.

Michele
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  #24  
Old 01-27-2013, 03:42 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz...bum-twist.html

It's still MACnificent! 35 years on, classic Fleetwood Mac album Rumours is back with a twist

By Adrian Thrills, The Daily Mail UK, January 24, 2013

Verdict: *****

Fleetwood Mac’s 1977 album Rumours wasn’t so much a rock record as a fully fledged soap opera.

Fuelled by drugs and tangled romances, it chronicled the five members’ raw emotions with classic songs like Don’t Stop, Go Your Own Way and Dreams.

Keyboardist Christine McVie described the sessions as a ‘nightly cocktail party’ while drummer Mick Fleetwood said they were ‘crucifyingly difficult’.

But the Anglo-Americans pressed on to finish ‘the most important album we ever made’.

On Monday — 35 years after its original release — Rumours is back. The landmark album is being re-issued in two packages with bonus material, out-takes and live recordings to mark the band’s reunion tour (UK dates are expected to be in late September).

A three-CD version, selling at around £12, contains the original album, bonus tracks and the live material. For Mac maniacs, a ‘deluxe’ edition, close to £50, is bolstered by further outtakes, a DVD and copy of Rumours on vinyl.

So how does it all stand up three-and-a-half decades on? Very well indeed. Echoes of the album’s radio-friendly hooks and harmonies can now be heard in modern bands like The Pierces and Haim.

The album has even been the focus of a TV episode of Glee, while an a cappella cover of Don’t Stop is currently heard on a Seat cars’ advert.

The main reason why Rumours continues to fascinate is the way it vividly documents the band’s twisted relationships. Mick was in the throes of a painful divorce from Jenny Boyd and would go on to have an affair with Mac singer Stevie Nicks.

Bassist John McVie and keyboardist Christine had just broken up after eight years of marriage, while Stevie and guitarist Lindsey Buckingham were heading for the rocks following a five-year romance.

The band poured the trauma into their writing: Buckingham’s Go Your Own Way was a hurtful parting shot at Nicks, who responded with Dreams; Christine McVie aimed Don’t Stop at John to show him how she had moved on; he suggested the title Rumours because the group, without admitting it, were all writing songs about each other.

The songs pushed founder members Mick and John away from their roots in British blues to something that sounds contemporary even today.

The rollicking Don’t Stop remains a radio staple while The Chain is the BBC’s theme tune for its Formula 1 coverage.

Stevie once told me: ‘What I remember aren’t the bad nights when we weren’t speaking to one another but the night Dreams was written.

'I walked in and handed a rough cassette to Lindsey. He was mad with me at the time but he played it and looked up at me and smiled.

‘We knew what was going on was very sad. We were couples who couldn’t make it through the perils of fame but we still looked on each other with a lot of respect. It was a shame we had to break up but we got Go Your Own Way and Dreams out of it all. How upset can you be about that?’

The bonus material is strong — especially the songs left off the original album. Of the alternate versions of album tracks, the picks are an early incarnation of Dreams and a new version of I Don’t Want To Know. Less impressive are the jam sessions on the deluxe edition, while the live songs from 1977 don’t add anything.

But the real joys are to be found by listening again to the original, 39-minute album. It’s no wonder Fleetwood Mac were so keen to overcome the tribulations and finish a record with some of the catchiest, most intriguing songs of the Seventies.



RUMOURS AND FACTS

The album topped the U.S. chart for 31 weeks — and has now sold 40 million copies worldwide.

The sleeve features Herbert Worthington’s black-and-white photo of Stevie Nicks and soon-to-be-lover Mick Fleetwood.

Rumours won a Grammy for album of the year in 1978.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz...#ixzz2JD78eoMM
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
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Old 01-28-2013, 05:46 PM
Dragonfly Dragonfly is offline
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Thanks for posting that Michele.

This was from The Daily Express (25/1/13)
www.express.co.uk/music

FLEETWOOD MAC: Rumours - 35th Anniversary
3CD Deluxe Edition
***** (Rhino)

If you do not have this seminal, wonderful album in your collection, why not?
If you do why not get this too, a very collectible bumper 3CD edition of the album that changed many people's worlds and shone a light into the lives of aspiring singer-songwriters the globe over.

It's dazzling compositions such as Dreams, Go Your Own Way and Don't Stop have proven lucratively slick for not only Fleetwood Mac but the dozens of artists who have covered them since.

Originally released in 1977 this celebratory collection includes remasters, B-sides, live recordings and is still perfect.

STEPHEN UNWIN





This was another review from The Mail On Sunday (27/1/13)

FLEETWOOD MAC RUMOURS 35TH ANNIVERSARY DELUXE EDITION
*****
Generation after generation loves Fleetwood Mac's luscious, 40 million-selling 1977 soft-rock classic Rumours, we are often told, because with the band's two couples both enduring painful splits, they poured their woes into the songs.

From the nervy explosion of Lindsey Buckingham's Go Your Own Way to the rebound celebration of Christine McVie's You Make Loving Fun, Rumours is a vindication of messy workplace romances.

The add-ons here only gild the lily of a more or less perfect record.

ADAM WOODS
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Old 01-29-2013, 12:23 AM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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Thanks Dragon Fly, because I didn't see the Daily Express one.

Michele
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Old 01-29-2013, 12:24 AM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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Ultimate Classic Rock Fleetwood Mac, ‘Rumours (Expanded Edition)’ — Album Review, January 27, 2013

http://ultimateclassicrock.com/fleet...dition-review/

by Michael Gallucci

Breakup albums don’t get much better than ‘Rumours,’ Fleetwood Mac’s 1977 blockbuster that was recorded as band members went through various stages of relationship adjustment. When they made their breakthrough self-titled album in 1975, Fleetwood Mac included two couples, one married; by the time ‘Rumours’ was released, they were broken up. Listen to the record, and you’ll get an idea what happened.

The ‘Expanded Edition’ of ‘Rumours’ – which includes a disc of live tracks and a CD of outtakes and alternate versions – makes things even more clear. In an early take of Lindsey Buckingham’s ‘Go Your Own Way,’ he sings “You can roll like thunder,” a direct reference to former girlfriend Stevie Nicks’ lyric in ‘Dreams’ — “Thunder only happens when it’s raining.” The additional line makes a bitchy breakup song even bitchier.

And that’s where this ‘Expanded Edition,’ which tacks on 29 songs to the original ‘Rumours,’ earns its price tag (there’s also a new deluxe that includes a DVD, vinyl copy of ‘Rumours’ and a CD of outtakes that was included in the 2004 reissue). The early, sometimes raw versions of these familiar tracks are occasionally revealing, especially Buckingham’s sketchier cuts, like early takes of ‘Second Hand News’ and ‘I Don’t Want to Know,’ where he’s finding universal footing on deeply personal songs.

Nicks’ tracks, on the other hand, are mostly fully formed here. In fact, an early take of ‘Silver Springs’ – one of her best songs, initially left off ‘Rumours’ but reinstated here and on the 2004 reissue as part of the original album – is better than the released version. A handful of other leftovers (including one from the band’s other singer-songwriter, Christine McVie) were wisely left off the 1977 masterpiece.

The live cuts, taken from a few different shows on the 1977 tour, don’t stray far from the studio versions. Most are ‘Rumours’ songs, with a few from ‘Fleetwood Mac’ (‘Monday Morning,’ ‘Rhiannon’ and a rumbling ‘World Turning’) tossed in. The heart of the reissue – besides the original album, of course, which still sounds like one of the most perfect records ever made – is the new sides of old favorites. They’re the scars that ‘Rumours’ tried to cover.
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Old 01-29-2013, 03:17 PM
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Default *35th* Anniversary of Rumours

I'm seeing this everywhere...why???

35 years was last year...they missed the boat, and are pretending nobody will notice?
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Old 01-29-2013, 03:20 PM
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Well, TECHNICALLY it still has a week or so before it turns 36

They squeezed it in at the very last moment.
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Old 01-29-2013, 03:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WildHearted View Post
Well, TECHNICALLY it still has a week or so before it turns 36

They squeezed it in at the very last moment.
Haha...fair point ;-)
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