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  #61  
Old 05-31-2014, 05:50 AM
secret love secret love is offline
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Originally Posted by lovethemac1 View Post
It is the best album EVER, period, full stop.
Rumours is great but what is most remarkable about it is how over-rated it is, there I said it, full stop.
P.S. I am of the Tusk-devotees.
Also LOVE Say You Will which gets a lot of hate from some Ledgies.
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  #62  
Old 05-31-2014, 05:55 PM
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May or may not be the best Album ever, but its the only music that even after 37 years still makes the hair stand up on the back of my neck.
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  #63  
Old 06-01-2014, 03:56 AM
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Originally Posted by sue View Post
May or may not be the best Album ever, but its the only music that even after 37 years still makes the hair stand up on the back of my neck.
Can't say the same, as I don't have a hairy neck.
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  #64  
Old 03-28-2015, 04:08 AM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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L. A. Music Blog, March 27, 2015 by Winnie Fan

Top 5 Albums That Will Make You Want to Go Outside

http://lamusicblog.com/2015/03/news/...to-go-outside/

Enjoy great music in the great outdoors!

Fleetwood Mac – Rumours

Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours is great for any variety of situations, but there’s an energy to the tracks that makes you want to get up and just go. Given the story behind the album, that shouldn’t be too surprising, but bitter internal struggles aside, the album drives and that’s just what I want to do when I hear it. Even slower songs like “Silver Springs” are reminiscent of the lazy detours on a road trip. Plus, traveling is one of the best times for self-reflection, and Rumours is painfully good at reminding you of that one time in your life — you know the one.
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  #65  
Old 03-28-2015, 04:05 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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http://www.sentryreview.com/entertai...ers-h3194.html

The most significant promoting album of 1977 was Fleetwood Mac's "Rumours." In the words of Spin magazine, it was music produced by "rich, luxuriating hippie sophisticates who cavorted like sprites and nymphs and sipped chardonnay."
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  #66  
Old 06-16-2015, 06:23 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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WZLX June 15, 2015 10:00 AM by Sabrina Boyd (@SabrinaKayaB)

Rock’s Best Breakup Songs

http://wzlx.cbslocal.com/2015/06/15/...breakup-songs/

Fleetwood Mac made their most famous album, Rumours, in the midst of mass breakups.

Really, everyone in the band was going through a breakup – John and Christine McVie, Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham, and Mick Fleetwood and his wife.

Somehow, rather than blowing the band apart, the two ex-couples and Mick turned all that pain and heartbreak into an amazing record.

The most successful song from that album, “Dreams,” became the band’s only #1 Billboard single on June 18, 1977. It was written by Stevie Nicks, about Lindsey Buckingham, of course.

“Now here you go again / You say you want your freedom / Well, who am I to keep you down?”
“Like a heartbeat, drives you mad / In the stillness of remembering what you had / And what you lost”

Nicks wrote the song in 10 minutes during a recording session for another track on the album. Surprisingly, but fortunately, Buckingham wasn’t upset by it at all – he appreciated the beauty of the music. Nicks told The Daily Mail,


“I walked in and handed a cassette of the song to Lindsey. It was a rough take, just me singing solo and playing piano. Even though he was mad with me at the time, Lindsey played it and then looked up at me and smiled. What was going on between us was sad. We were couples who couldn’t make it through. But, as musicians, we still respected each other – and we got some brilliant songs out of it.”

“Go Your Own Way” – Fleetwood Mac

“Loving you / Isn’t the right thing to do / How can I ever change things that I feel?”

Come on, they definitely deserve to be on this list twice.
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  #67  
Old 06-16-2015, 11:49 PM
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Originally Posted by michelej1 View Post
That's funny. Perfect or not, they should do it this tour, in honor of the reissue. If Stevie still doesn't like the song, let Lindsey do it alone.

Michele
"Take a listen to your spirit -- it's crying out loud."

I love "I Don't Want to Know." It's the only Rumours song they have never been performed on stage. It's a rare vocal duet between Lindsey and Stevie - a pure Buckingham Nicks moment on the album.

Though it wasn't on the Buckingham Nicks album, the song was performed in their live shows.
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  #68  
Old 07-22-2015, 01:25 AM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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[Go hear a spoken word tribute to the album in Australia]

http://www.echo.net.au/2015/07/featu...ters-festival/

Echo Net Daily July 22, 2015 |

Festival favourite, literary cabaret Liner Notes returns on Saturday August 8 at Byron Theatre. A spoken-word tribute to a classic album, Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours, as song-by-song a stellar line-up of writers, poets, and musicians explore their personal connection to a musical legend. Featuring special guests George Megalogenis, Hannie Rayson, Andy Griffiths, Krissy Kneen, Erik Jensen, Clare Wright, Marc Fennell and Zohab Zee Khan with Emilie Zoey Baker and Sean M Whelan and MC Michael Nolan.
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  #69  
Old 07-30-2015, 11:56 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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Prince George Citizen by Neil Godbout / July 27, 2015 06:48 PM - See more at: http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/o....mKQwD7TT.dpuf

[This article asks whether if technological improvements allow you to make BETTER music or art now than you could in the past, if the outcome is still art or just mimicry. He discusses Lindsey and FM near the end.]

The biggest debate that runs through the philosophy of art is about authenticity. A series of hypothetical questions exposes the problem: If a 12-year-old produces an exact copy of the Mona Lisa, is it mimicry or is it artistry? If a fake of the Mona Lisa has been hanging in the Louvre for 50 years, how does that ruin the experience for those who saw the fake? How much preservation work is allowed to a piece of priceless art before it stops being the original work? These questions flow through all of the artistic disciplines, not just visual art. For music fans, this can be as toxic a dinner conversation as discussing religion or politics.

The vast majority of John Fogerty's fabulous show Sunday night at CN Centre were Credence Clearwater Revival songs. He was the songwriter, the lead singer and the guitarist on those classic songs, so does he have artistic licence to perform them or is there something inauthentic about his performance? Go back to the Journey show two weeks ago.

Guitarist Neal Schon founded the band and he is the only one who has played on every Journey album and every Journey live show. The current lineup features Schon and two others from the classic early 1980s lineup but can the band call itself Journey without lead singer Steve Perry, the voice behind all of the band's most beloved songs? Has Journey's "Journey-ishness" been lost? The only member left from Foreigner's heyday is guitarist and songwriter Mick Jones, who founded the band. To make matters even more delicate, Jones doesn't play every night the band does. When he sits out, is it Foreigner or a hand-picked cover band by the man who owns the Foreigner name? Should Jones call his band Foreigner when the lead vocals on the band's best-known work were song by Lou Gramm? Here's how weird this can get. Both Foreigner and Lou Gramm are touring this summer independently of each other. According to setlist.fm, an online clearinghouse for the songs performed at each stop on a live tour, both Foreigner and Gramm are consistently opening their lives shows with Double Vision, a rock radio staple. Which version of Double Vision is authentic or is neither? Music purists can twist themselves into knots on these issues.

Lindsey Buckingham of Fleetwood Mac is still an incredible guitar player but even the most diehard Mac fan would have to admit his voice is gone (and the voice of Stevie Nicks is only marginally better). Is it better to see Buckingham and Nicks struggle to sing notes they can't hit nearly 40 years later or to see a tribute band reproduce the songs note perfect, just the way they did it on Rumours?

This is about not just art but business, of course. Fleetwood Mac charged hundreds of dollars per ticket to see the classic Rumours lineup reunited on its recent North American tour. According to Pollstar, those 56 shows brought in gross revenues of $92 million. Fans have answered with their wallets.

Somehow it's better to hear aging acts struggle to reproduce yesteryear's greatest hits in concert than to hear younger, more capable singers and musicians perform the same material. Although Journey remains a solid concert draw worldwide and in Prince George, more than a few fans passed on their recent CN Centre show, sniffing that Arnel Pineda is no Steve Perry. The problem is no live musical act is who they were in the studio, either, where the best takes out of countless demos, rehearsals and takes makes the final record.

Buckingham's guitar solo on Go Your Own Way is pieces of three guitar solos, pieced together for Rumours, according to album co-producer Richard Dashut in his book Making Rumours. In other words, Buckingham never played it the way we hear it. And that was then.

Recording technology has advanced to such a degree that musicians don't have to ever be in the same place to record together, and every part of their performance can be digitally altered and enhanced. Which then begs the question of why it's so important for so many to see the original artist perform the original songs. The simple answer is because it's cool and it's fun and it feels authentic. And, in the case of people like John Fogerty, with both his voice and his guitar work remarkably well-preserved nearly 50 years into his career, it's inspiring and it makes for an incredible night of live music. -- Managing editor Neil Godbout - See more at: http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/o....mKQwD7TT.dpuf
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  #70  
Old 09-13-2015, 08:38 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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[I realize this is just an ad more than anything else]

On the record – with Pete Gallon, Blue Belle Digital 9/13/2015

http://bluebelldigital.co.uk/eastgri...pete-gallon-5/

I have Radio Luxembourg to thank for my introduction to Fleetwood Mac.

Listening to Albatross, fading in and out across the 208 medium wave band, jostling for signal amongst a cacophony of foreign stations broadcasting into the European night – wonderful times, and in the days before the clarity and quality really mattered, the music won me over!

There are two distinct eras of Fleetwood Mac, pre and post RUMOURS.

This multi million-selling album originally released in in 1977 in the midst of the Punk explosion, and was seen by many to be a bit of a dinosaur amongst the raging energy of Punk.

Some dinosaur!

Forty years later and withover 40 million copies sold, it remains one of the best-selling albums ever released.

Recorded during a period of personal turmoil amongst band members, it resultedin the divorce of John and Christine McVie.

Fellow band member Stevie Nicks suggests that the band produced their best work when they were in the toughest times.

The tracks – Go Your Own Way, Dreams, You Make Loving Fun and Don’t Stop – were all released as singles. And more recently The Chain has gained huge recognition associated with BBCs F1 broadcasts.

Future Audio now has a stock of the latest incarnation of this iconic album. Pressed as a double album on 180gram Vinyl, with 45RPM playback, the packaging is beautiful gatefold and – as you would expect – the sound quality is awesome.

Available in store now at £28.
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  #71  
Old 04-03-2016, 05:22 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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March 30, 2016 Casey Nugent ‘17 / Emertainment Monthly Staff Writer

Top 10 Albums of all Times, Emertainment Monthly

http://emertainmentmonthly.com/2016/...-albums-time//

3. Rumours by Fleetwood Mac

RumoursA question I’ve asked myself a lot over the past years is “where would I be without Stevie Nicks?” Nicks is a weird, wild, wonderful woman. She’s the type of rock star that comes along only every once in awhile, someone’s whose vocal power and stage presence match up to their talents as a writer. I’ve never had a breakup as bad as Rumours, but I’ve had some disastrous fights and falling outs, and Rumours is always the first thing on the queue in the aftermath. But outside of that, Rumours was an album that I first heard with my mother. There’s something forever nostalgic and important about the music your parents gave you, which is what elevates Rumours to one of my personal favorites.
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  #72  
Old 04-03-2016, 05:25 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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LAist: Let's Revisit Fleetwood Mac's Rumours
BY DEVON MCREYNOLDS IN ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT ON APR 2, 2016 2:15 PM

http://laist.com/2016/04/02/lay_me_d...o_my_stuff.php

On April 2, 1977, Fleetwood Mac's Rumours began a long run at the top of the Billboard 200 chart, where it would stay for a (nonconsecutive) 31 weeks. The only brief interruptions in the number one spot were from The Eagles Hotel California and a live Barry Manilow album. No thanks. Since its release, Rumours has sold over 40 million copies worldwide—behind Michael Jackson's Thriller (makes sense), and, for some reason, Meat Loaf's Bat Out Of Hell.
Anyway, Rumours is flawless— don't listen to this guy. And not only is it flawless in and of itself (Robert Christgau wrote that it "it jumps right out of the speakers at you") but the tales of its recording are notoriously bat**** crazy, too.

So join me in this brief history of The Mac's masterpiece born of heartbreak, genius, and cocaine. Lots of cocaine.

In February 1976, the gang headed up to the Record Plant in Sausalito, right after singer/ keyboardist Christine McVie and bassist John McVie had just split up after 8 years of marriage and were barely speaking to each other. Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham, who had been together for six years, were about to call it quits too. In his 1977 piece for Rolling Stone, cub reporter Cameron Crowe characterized the situation in Sausalito as "an emotional holocaust."

Here are some choice nuggets:

"Trauma," Christine groans. "Trau-ma. The sessions were like a cocktail party every night - people everywhere. We ended up staying in these weird hospital rooms...and of course John and me were not exactly the best of friends. Stevie...was going through a bit of a hard time too because she was the one that axed it. Lindsey was pretty down about it for a while, then he just woke up one morning and said, '**** this, I don't want to be unhappy,' and started getting some girlfriends together. Then Stevie couldn't handle it..."

Lindsey Buckingham sets down the guitar. "Tonight I just want to go get drunk," he announces. "I know the exact place too. They let me throw the food..."

"It was clumsy sometimes," said John McVie. "I'm sitting there in the studio and I get a little lump in my throat - especially when you turn around and the writer's sitting right there."

This was apparent, especially in "Go Your Own Way": Nicks did not appreciate Buckingham's pointed lyrics, "packing up, shacking up is all you wanna do," telling Rolling Stone:

I very much resented him telling the world that "packing up, shacking up" with different men was all I wanted to do...He knew it wasn't true. It was just an angry thing that he said. Every time those words would come onstage, I wanted to go over and kill him. He knew it, so he really pushed my buttons through that. It was like, "I'll make you suffer for leaving me." And I did.

There's another Buckingham v. Nicks story to the recording of "You Make Lovin' Fun" from producer Ken Caillat's book Making Rumours:

We played around with some ideas, and, eventually, Stevie and Lindsey were sitting on two high stools out in the studio, each of them in front of a microphone, working on background parts, singing, “You make lovin’ fun, you make lovin’ fun . . .” When I stopped the tape to rewind it, Stevie suddenly looked at Lindsey and cried out, “**** you, asshole! You can go to hell!”
Lindsey responded with a tirade of his own. “When we get back to L.A., I’m moving out.”

“I don’t want to live with you, either!” They went back and forth, screaming and yelling at each other.

I couldn’t rewind the tape fast enough. When I got to the beginning of the tape, I hit RECORD. Stevie and Lindsey looked at each other. Then they turned toward their microphones and, right on cue, right in the middle of a fight, they nailed their parts! What just happened? I was flabbergasted.

Here's more from a 2013 interview with The Guardian:
"We were cool onstage," Nicks says. "But offstage everybody was pretty angry. Most nights Chris and I would just go for dinner on our own, downstairs in the hotel, with security at the door."

As McVie explains: "John and I used to be civil - 'What key is this in? What do you want me to do on this song?' - but Stevie and Lindsey were fighting all the time. Very volatile. Their relationship still is an ongoing battle."

The band had various ways of dealing with the tensions, one of which was through the nostrils. "It wasn't like we woke up one day and everybody had bowls of coke on the tables," Nicks says. "It was a gradual thing."

It was also a glamour thing. In Sausalito, California, where the two women were based during the recording of Rumours, McVie recalls the paraphernalia on offer fondly: "You could go to these shops and buy these little beautiful coke bottles that you wore around your neck - gold, turquoise, all sorts of colours with diamonds and a little spoon. So Stevie and I wore those - it was very aesthetic."

We'd be remiss not to include the backstory for "Dreams," the only Mac song to reach #1 (and a song all-too-often prone to obnoxious covers). Caillat told Sound on Sound:

Stevie used to get bored, sitting around while all the technical stuff was going on, so she asked if there was a room with a piano to noodle around on. Well, the Record Plant told her she could use Sly Stone's studio — a little sunken room that they'd built for him to work in — and one day while we were working on some track, she came in and said, 'I've just written the most amazing song.' 'Really? Let's hear it.'

And I've just got to include "The Chain"—my personal go-to karaoke pick—and soundtrack to one of my fondest Philadelphia memories (and, the only song on Rumours credited to all five members of the Mac).

Fleetwood Mac will never escape the legends and legacy of Rumoursbecause it's so much more than just a slice of the '70s. Buckingham revisited the making of album in a 2013 Rolling Stone interview:

That really was a lot of the appeal of Rumours. The music was wonderful, but the music was also authentic because it was two couples breaking up and writing dialogue to each other. It was also appealing because we were rising to the occasion to follow our destiny. So you had to live in denial, you had to learn to compartmentalize your emotions and do what needs to be done. It brought out the voyeur a little bit in everybody.

I know this is an impossible request, but what is your favorite track from Rumours? Tell us in the comments.
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  #73  
Old 04-03-2016, 05:31 PM
bombaysaffires bombaysaffires is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michelej1 View Post
LAist: Let's Revisit Fleetwood Mac's Rumours
BY DEVON MCREYNOLDS IN ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT ON APR 2, 2016 2:15 PM

http://laist.com/2016/04/02/lay_me_d...o_my_stuff.php

On April 2, 1977, Fleetwood Mac's Rumours began a long run at the top of the Billboard 200 chart, where it would stay for a (nonconsecutive) 31 weeks. The only brief interruptions in the number one spot were from The Eagles Hotel California and a live Barry Manilow album. No thanks. Since its release, Rumours has sold over 40 million copies worldwide—behind Michael Jackson's Thriller (makes sense), and, for some reason, Meat Loaf's Bat Out Of Hell.
Anyway, Rumours is flawless— don't listen to this guy. And not only is it flawless in and of itself (Robert Christgau wrote that it "it jumps right out of the speakers at you") but the tales of its recording are notoriously bat**** crazy, too.

So join me in this brief history of The Mac's masterpiece born of heartbreak, genius, and cocaine. Lots of cocaine.

In February 1976, the gang headed up to the Record Plant in Sausalito, right after singer/ keyboardist Christine McVie and bassist John McVie had just split up after 8 years of marriage and were barely speaking to each other. Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham, who had been together for six years, were about to call it quits too. In his 1977 piece for Rolling Stone, cub reporter Cameron Crowe characterized the situation in Sausalito as "an emotional holocaust."

Here are some choice nuggets:

"Trauma," Christine groans. "Trau-ma. The sessions were like a cocktail party every night - people everywhere. We ended up staying in these weird hospital rooms...and of course John and me were not exactly the best of friends. Stevie...was going through a bit of a hard time too because she was the one that axed it. Lindsey was pretty down about it for a while, then he just woke up one morning and said, '**** this, I don't want to be unhappy,' and started getting some girlfriends together. Then Stevie couldn't handle it..."

Lindsey Buckingham sets down the guitar. "Tonight I just want to go get drunk," he announces. "I know the exact place too. They let me throw the food..."

"It was clumsy sometimes," said John McVie. "I'm sitting there in the studio and I get a little lump in my throat - especially when you turn around and the writer's sitting right there."

This was apparent, especially in "Go Your Own Way": Nicks did not appreciate Buckingham's pointed lyrics, "packing up, shacking up is all you wanna do," telling Rolling Stone:

I very much resented him telling the world that "packing up, shacking up" with different men was all I wanted to do...He knew it wasn't true. It was just an angry thing that he said. Every time those words would come onstage, I wanted to go over and kill him. He knew it, so he really pushed my buttons through that. It was like, "I'll make you suffer for leaving me." And I did.

There's another Buckingham v. Nicks story to the recording of "You Make Lovin' Fun" from producer Ken Caillat's book Making Rumours:

We played around with some ideas, and, eventually, Stevie and Lindsey were sitting on two high stools out in the studio, each of them in front of a microphone, working on background parts, singing, “You make lovin’ fun, you make lovin’ fun . . .” When I stopped the tape to rewind it, Stevie suddenly looked at Lindsey and cried out, “**** you, asshole! You can go to hell!”
Lindsey responded with a tirade of his own. “When we get back to L.A., I’m moving out.”

“I don’t want to live with you, either!” They went back and forth, screaming and yelling at each other.

I couldn’t rewind the tape fast enough. When I got to the beginning of the tape, I hit RECORD. Stevie and Lindsey looked at each other. Then they turned toward their microphones and, right on cue, right in the middle of a fight, they nailed their parts! What just happened? I was flabbergasted.

Here's more from a 2013 interview with The Guardian:
"We were cool onstage," Nicks says. "But offstage everybody was pretty angry. Most nights Chris and I would just go for dinner on our own, downstairs in the hotel, with security at the door."

As McVie explains: "John and I used to be civil - 'What key is this in? What do you want me to do on this song?' - but Stevie and Lindsey were fighting all the time. Very volatile. Their relationship still is an ongoing battle."

The band had various ways of dealing with the tensions, one of which was through the nostrils. "It wasn't like we woke up one day and everybody had bowls of coke on the tables," Nicks says. "It was a gradual thing."

It was also a glamour thing. In Sausalito, California, where the two women were based during the recording of Rumours, McVie recalls the paraphernalia on offer fondly: "You could go to these shops and buy these little beautiful coke bottles that you wore around your neck - gold, turquoise, all sorts of colours with diamonds and a little spoon. So Stevie and I wore those - it was very aesthetic."

We'd be remiss not to include the backstory for "Dreams," the only Mac song to reach #1 (and a song all-too-often prone to obnoxious covers). Caillat told Sound on Sound:

Stevie used to get bored, sitting around while all the technical stuff was going on, so she asked if there was a room with a piano to noodle around on. Well, the Record Plant told her she could use Sly Stone's studio — a little sunken room that they'd built for him to work in — and one day while we were working on some track, she came in and said, 'I've just written the most amazing song.' 'Really? Let's hear it.'

And I've just got to include "The Chain"—my personal go-to karaoke pick—and soundtrack to one of my fondest Philadelphia memories (and, the only song on Rumours credited to all five members of the Mac).

Fleetwood Mac will never escape the legends and legacy of Rumoursbecause it's so much more than just a slice of the '70s. Buckingham revisited the making of album in a 2013 Rolling Stone interview:

That really was a lot of the appeal of Rumours. The music was wonderful, but the music was also authentic because it was two couples breaking up and writing dialogue to each other. It was also appealing because we were rising to the occasion to follow our destiny. So you had to live in denial, you had to learn to compartmentalize your emotions and do what needs to be done. It brought out the voyeur a little bit in everybody.

I know this is an impossible request, but what is your favorite track from Rumours? Tell us in the comments.
It probably sounds totally weird but I've always been curious to find a photo in which either of them is wearing such a thing, coz I've seen gazillions of pics from that time and can't recall seeing any jewelry on either of them that fits this description....
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  #74  
Old 04-03-2016, 07:26 PM
Mr Scarrott Mr Scarrott is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by

[B
Lindsey Buckingham of Fleetwood Mac [/b]is still an incredible guitar player but even the most diehard Mac fan would have to admit his voice is gone (and the voice of Stevie Nicks is only marginally better). Is it better to see Buckingham and Nicks struggle to sing notes they can't hit nearly 40 years later or to see a tribute band reproduce the songs note perfect, just the way they did it on Rumours?

This is about not just art but business, of course. Fleetwood Mac charged hundreds of dollars per ticket to see the classic Rumours lineup reunited on its recent North American tour. According to Pollstar, those 56 shows brought in gross revenues of $92 million. Fans have answered with their wallets.
This kind of thing annoys me. I don't go to a Fleetwood Mac gig expecting to be transported back in a TARDIS to 1977. I know that Stevie and Lindsey's voices have lost a lot of their range.. their timbres are decidedly different.. Christine's occasional vocal flubs are to be expected but we understand this, accept it, and embrace it. We're getting older, too .These people are aged 65 to 72. They still perform credibly and with passion and have an audience that overwhelmingly goes home happy to have been in their company for two and a half hours...

I'm seeing these people now and that's what great about it. If they're still performing just for the money, they're hiding their motivation well enough for me. They still play and sing every note as if their lives depend on it.
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  #75  
Old 04-15-2016, 07:38 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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Emertainment Monthly, Editor's Choice Top 10 Albums

EDITOR’S CHOICE: Top 10 Albums April 15, 2016 Anna Marketti

NUMBER NINE

http://emertainmentmonthly.com/2016/...top-10-albums/

Yes, it’s the album that made Fleetwood Mac famous. No, it doesn’t have “Landslide” on it. Rumours is still a hot topic in the music industry due to its production values and pure diversity of sound. Steady bass and drums underscore the entire album, with Lindsey Buckingham free to shred away on his guitar. Christine McVie and Stevie Nicks passed the mic back and forth for the vocal components of the album, giving some songs the edgy rasp of Nicks’s voice, and the sultry, clear tones of McVie’s. Though their eponymous album (yes, the one with “Landslide”) that was released prior to Rumours reached number one on the charts, Rumours wins out in its appeal as a whole album. “Rhiannon” and “Landslide” were great for radio play, but the remainder of Fleetwood Mac isn’t as rife with rich musicality as Rumours. The twinkling guitar riffs on “Never Going Back Again” that support Buckingham’s nervous vocals are mystifying, and McVie’s command of the piano and her voice in “Songbird” is truly heartbreaking. Every member of Fleetwood Mac gets a turn to strut their stuff on Rumours, and it doesn’t go unnoticed.

Fun fact: You may know “I Don’t Want to Know” thanks to Paul Rudd.
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1997 Pretty Blond Singer Bekka Bramlett With Billy Burnette Press Photo
$20.0
1997 Pretty Blond Singer Bekka Bramlett With Billy Burnette Press Photo picture35 mm PHOTO SLIDE TRANSPARENCY #887 BEKKA BRAMLETT singer song writer
$1.49
35 mm PHOTO SLIDE TRANSPARENCY #887   BEKKA BRAMLETT  singer  song writer picture



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