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  #361  
Old 06-30-2016, 12:33 AM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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The World's Greatest Guitar Solos!


4:50 pm on 28 June 2016 Radio New Zealand

http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/pr...t-guitar-solos

Peter Green, Fleetwood Mac: Albatross

This got a big reaction from our audience. It features Peter Green on guitar who had left John Mayall with two other ex Mayall band members: Mick Fleetwood and John McVie. Released as a single in 1968, it topped the charts.

There’s an interesting story about the 1959 Sunburst Les Paul guitar Peter Green used to play back in the day of Fleetwood Mac. Green used it on many of his big hits including 'Oh Well, Black Magic Woman' and 'Man of the World'. He sold it to Gary Moore from Thin Lizzy (and a stellar solo career).

Gary played the 1959 Sunburst he bought from Peter Green for his entire career, eventually putting it up for sale. It was on the market for a few years before Kirk Hammett from Metallica paid an undisclosed sum for it… the guitar is unique in that one of the pick-ups was wired in the wrong way around, giving it a unique tone. Moore died in 2011 aged 58. This solo is an excerpt from his hit 'Parisienne Walkways' recorded live. It was his signature song performed on a signature guitar.

Gary Moore: Parisienne Walkways

Gary played the 1959 Sunburst he bought from Peter Green for his entire career, eventually putting it up for sale. It was on the market for a few years before Kirk Hammett from Metallica paid an undisclosed sum for it… the guitar is unique in that one of the pick-ups was wired in the wrong way around, giving it a unique tone. Moore died in 2011 aged 58. This solo is an excerpt from his hit 'Parisienne Walkways' recorded live. It was his signature song performed on a signature guitar.
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  #362  
Old 07-10-2016, 07:03 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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[Excerpt from Buffalo News review of Hollywood Vampires]

July 10, 2016 By Aaron Besecker

http://buffalo.com/2016/07/10/featur...cks-the-night/

Throughout, the supergroup was tight. The band used Fleetwood Mac’s “Stop Messin Around” to showcase its members’ musicianship. Perry sang lead vocal. Cooper took a harmonica solo. Depp – who doesn’t appear to be just an actor trying to play a role and fit in as a musician – and the other guitarists also took solos.
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  #363  
Old 07-27-2016, 06:55 AM
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50 Years Ago: John Mayall Enlists a New Member for ‘Blues Breakers With Eric Clapton’


John Mayall and Eric Clapton were both relatively well known when they joined up for an album in July 1966. But Blues Breakers With Eric Clapton took both artists’ careers to new levels and set them on their paths to their respective futures.
Clapton was fresh from the Yardbirds, the blues band he quit in disgust after they reached the Top 10 with the pop song “For Your Love” in 1965. Mayall was a beloved British blues singer, pianist and harmonica player with one album released under his name, a live record from the previous year that included bassist John McVie, just one year away from co-founding Fleetwood Mac with fellow future Bluesbreakers Mick Fleetwood and Peter Green.
Like Mayall’s debut album, Blues Breakers With Eric Clapton was supposed to be a concert recording. The 32-year-old felt that the band played best in front of an audience, which fed into his musicians’ performances. But the recording turned out to be unusable, so the group, once again with McVie on bass, went into a London studio in April 1966 and recorded a mix of covers and some originals penned by Mayall and Clapton. A dozen of them ended up on the album.
And even though Mayall’s name is on the cover, with Clapton given a featured spot, there’s no mistaking who the album belongs to. Unlike the harsher tones on the Yardbirds records, Clapton’s playing here is clear, precise and warm — everything that would make him a “god” to his growing legion of fans in the U.K. Blues Breakers With Eric Clapton marks the beginning of the guitarist’s legend. British blues rock starts here too.
Clapton sings only one song on the LP, a cover of Robert Johnson’s “Ramblin’ on My Mind,” but his solos dominate the rest of the record. Freddie King’s “Hideaway” is all clipped notes and bluesy shuffle until Clapton stomps his way to the end. A sweaty, rumbling take on Ray Charles’ “What’d I Say” turns into the sort of rave-up Clapton made famous with the Yardbirds. And the stripped-down “Ramblin’ on My Mind” is both a signature update and tribute to his lifelong musical inspiration.
The band — drummer Hughie Flint rounded out the quartet, and a horn section was later added to a few cuts — amplifies the traditional (and primarily Chicago blues) music, stamping it as something entirely original while keeping its roots firmly intact. It’s a deft move that helped ignite the era’s infatuation with blues-based rock music. (Jimi Hendrix, for one, was a huge fan of the record.)
But this lineup didn’t last long. While Mayall went on to record dozens of albums over the years with some of England’s best musicians, he and Clapton recorded together only once more, on 1971’s Back to the Roots LP. Clapton felt stifled in the Bluesbreakers and was looking for something new. Shortly after the release of Blues Breakers With Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce briefly joined the Bluesbreakers. It wouldn’t be long before he and Clapton, along with Bruce’s old Graham Bond Organisation bandmate Ginger Baker, were in a new group, Cream. Green, who was originally a Bluesbreaker before Clapton, then replaced Clapton, until he left for good with a couple more Bluesbreakers to form Fleetwood Mac.
And that’s pretty much Mayall’s legacy. Clapton once referred to him as a father figure, and his stature, and longevity, within the British music community attests to this. Pretty much every British blues musician from the period has played with Mayall, who was knighted in 2005, at some point during their careers. Blues Breakers With Eric Clapton reached the Top 10 in the U.K., kickstarting Mayall’s career and igniting Clapton’s. It didn’t chart in the U.S., but its influence over the years has long been secured. Every guitarist who’s ever played a Gibson Les Paul with warm, stinging fluidity owes a debt to this album. A huge one.



Read More: 50 Years Ago: John Mayall Enlists a New Member for 'Blues Breakers With Eric Clapton' | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/blues...ckback=tsmclip
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  #364  
Old 08-17-2016, 09:17 PM
michelej1 michelej1 is offline
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From an article about Nettlebed Esoteric Fayre, August 15, 2016

http://www.henleystandard.co.uk/ente....php?id=246320

“Fleetwood Mac used to do these things in Reading — pick these odd places to do a gig rather than just going round the circuit. So that’s what I loved about Nettlebed — it seemed such a weird place to put it on. It’s just great.”
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  #365  
Old 02-14-2017, 09:07 AM
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Blues legend to restart village Rockabella club

ROCKABELLA Rhythm & Blues Club in Beckington will start the year in style this weekend with a gig from blues legend and Fleetwood Mac producer, Mike Vernon.
Mike Vernon is a legend of the British and American Blues scene, the founder of Blue Horizon Records, the man behind John Mayall’s Beano and Hard Road albums, producer of Fleetwood Mac’s early albums, and has worked with many more famous artists.
He will play with his band The Mighty Combo at Beckington Village Hall from 7.30pm this Saturday, 18th February. Tickets cost £15 each and are available from www.rockabella.org


http://www.frometimes.co.uk/2017/02/...ckabella-club/
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  #366  
Old 02-28-2017, 02:40 PM
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‘Godfather of the Blues’ John Mayall, 83, announces new London shows

Name an artist who has done more to shape the direction of modern music and you’ll be hard-pressed to pick out anyone with such a significant contribution under his belt as John Mayall.
He is one of the most prolific British musicians of all time in any genre, let alone that which has given him the prestigious title, ‘Godfather of the Blues’.
Having amassed more than 60 albums over a career spanning six decades, the legendary Mayall is now set to embark on a massive UK tour – featuring an eye-catching double header at the Cadogan Hall in Chelsea.
The shows follow on from the release of his latest record, Talk About That – remarkably, his 65th album of original material.
At the ripe age of 83, Mayall is one of music’s longest-serving veterans. But if there is one style that grants the player the opportunity to age gracefully, it is certainly the blues.
“A certain maturity sets in after you’ve been playing for so long,” Mayall said in a 2011 interview with No Depression magazine, when asked how his approach had changed over the decades.
“You know yourself better and what works, and I think the experience you have with your tools of the trade – which in my case are keyboards, harmonica and sometimes the guitar, shows over time as you become more assured.
“You express yourself through the music and the longer you play, the more assured you get and the more refined your expression is.”
There have been fewer greater champions of the blues during the 20th – and 21st – centuries.
But Mayall has never quite received the kind of popular acclaim that his incredible body of work deserves.
In fact, in the minds of part-time fans, his fame has come more from the musicians he has mentored than his own work.
The likes of Eric Clapton, Mick Taylor and Fleetwood Mac’s Peter Green all featured in various line-ups of his legendary 60s supergroup John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers, and the icons of the era casually drop his name as a key influence on the scene.
Alongside his work with some of rock’s future greats, Mayall found fame across the pond.
He was heralded for his innovations in jazz and rock as well as his beloved blues, and scooped a Grammy for his 1993 album Wake Up Call, which featured guest appearances from Taylor, Mavis Staples and Buddy Guy.
Lauded with critical acclaim throughout his career, Mayall was awarded an OBE for services to British music in 2005 and was inducted – albeit long overdue – into the Blues Hall of Fame last year.
This crowning moment came eight years after Mayall officially retired the Bluesbreakers name. But he is now touring again as a trio with bass player George Rzab and drummer Jay Davenport. And his songs remain as dynamic and bold as ever.
Despite being an ever-present at each turning point in the genre’s illustrious history, Mayall has resisted the lures of technology.
His current shows are stripped-back blues affairs, often with very little equipment on stage.
“We sometimes play on the same bill with other acts that have mountains of equipment – two giant keyboards, speakers all over the place, you know, banks of monitors all over the stage – and we have virtually nothing,” he says. “We’re pretty minimalistic.”
Even without the fully-charged stage setup behind him, Mayall remains one of the most powerful players in the game.
John Mayall and his band will perform along with special guests the Buddy Whittington Band at the Cadogan Hall on November 2 and 3.



https://www.londonnewsonline.co.uk/1...-london-shows/
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  #367  
Old 04-01-2017, 11:58 AM
FuzzyPlum FuzzyPlum is offline
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B24/7

Music: Interview: Sari Schorr
https://www.bristol247.com/culture/m...w-sari-schorr/


Sari Schorr’s debut album A Force of Nature was produced by Mike Vernon whose credits include Fleetwood Mac, John Mayall & the Blues Breakers, David Bowie, Savoy Brown, Chicken Shack, Eric Clapton, Peter Green, Christine McVie and Ten Years After; Sari Schorr’s band the Engine Room includes Innes Sibun (former Robert Plant guitarist); Sari Schorr is a marathon runner, animal rights activist and aspiring vegan; Sari Schorr currently lives in Brooklyn, New York with her husband and rescued pit bull triplets; Sari Schorr is playing the Lantern on Thursday 16th March as part of the Blues and Jazz festival; Sari Schorr is the latest artist to submit to the vinyl enquirer.

What was the first record you ever bought and where did you buy it?

It was Led Zeppelin’s Physical Graffiti. I bought it at my favourite grungy record store in New York. I was such a good customer, the owner let me run a tab and pay when I had saved up enough money.

What was the most recent record you bought and where did you buy it?

I bought Phoebe Snow’s Something Real last night. My manager mention Phoebe and it made me long for her voice. I was fortunate enough to have known Phoebe. She was a beautiful soul. I have many of her albums back in NY. I bought this one for the second time on iTunes.

What record do you stick on the deck to sooth your soul?

I always keep Billie Holiday nearby. The melancholy soulfulness of her voice grounds and soothes me.

Have you bought a record on the basis of a great single and then been disappointed by the rest of the album? If so, tell us all about it…

For me, Guns N’ Roses’ Chinese Democracy fell short and felt fragmented. But, to be fair, making a great album is a monumental task, even for a legendary band. So, the occasional run off the rails far outweighs the rewards when those brilliant albums do get made.

What record do you turn up to maximum to get in to that party mood?

King King Live – the first ever live album from the band. I love this album because it really captures the raw, intense energy of this great band.

If we had the ability to land you at the recording of one classic LP so you could witness the whole recording process, what would you choose and why?

I’d take a ride in a time machine back to 1968. I’d sneak into the studio with Peter Green, Mick Fleetwood, John McVie, Jeremy Spencer and their producer Mike Vernon to witness history in the making as they recorded Fleetwood Mac. Having spent a lot of time in the studio with Mike, I’d love to see him work his magic with Fleetwood Mac during those very first recordings they ever did together. It must have been amazing.

Ever bought a record solely because you liked the sleeve? If so, what was it and did it delight you or disappoint you?

I do it all the time. If a cover speaks to me, I’ll take a leap of faith because I’m always on the lookout for something interesting. I discovered Wilco when the cover of Yankee Hotel Foxtrot appealed to me.

Oh no, your house is burning down and you can only rescue one record! What would it be and why?

Led Zeppelin, The Complete Studio Recordings, even if that’s cheating a bit. This innovative band really inspired me and influenced my song writing. Not to mention, Robert Plant is one of my favourite singers of all times.

What’s your favourite record sleeve? Tell us all about it (and whether or not the music gives you as much pleasure as the sleeve).

The iconic cover of Pink Floyd’s, Dark Side of the Moon by Storm Thorgerson. It’s one of my favourites because of it of its minimalist design and thought provoking image. The triangle symbolizes thought and ambition. It is a piece of music art history.

Morbidity alert: what record would you like played at your funeral?

I’ll stay with Pink Floyd here and say The Great Gig in the Sky, what else could it be?
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  #368  
Old 04-14-2017, 07:24 AM
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Someone posted a decent quality version of the whole Live at The Roxy concert of Bob Welch in 1981 with Italian subtitles:

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STEVIE NICKS EDGE OF SEVENTEEN 1981 ORIGINAL UNIQUE COVER ART WORK BELLA DONNA
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STEVIE NICKS EDGE OF SEVENTEEN 1981 ORIGINAL UNIQUE COVER ART WORK BELLA DONNA  picture1981 STEVIE NICKS 'BELLA DONNA' ORIGINAL INNER SLEEVE ART WORK 15 X 19 IN
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Fleetwood Mac Signed Photo Stevie Nicks Mick Fleetwood Christie McVee John McVee pictureSIGNED - Mick Fleetwood "Mac" Drumhead 12" + Pic
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