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  #1351  
Old 04-12-2017, 05:17 AM
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Lessons in Authenticity from Stevie Nicks

As a millennial, it’s easy to feel underwhelmed by the lack of authenticity and grit that exists among pop-culture, and society in general. I grew up before the advent of social media—before comment threads and virtual walls and double-taps that fire more dopamine than a sugar rush—in the days where it took approximately 46 minutes to dial up the modem and required genuine effort to communicate, you know, using actual words. And I may spend a solid part of my day on the ‘gram (it’s literally part of my job), I’m thankful I know a time before all that.
And when I was about six years old—before every moment of our lives were recorded and then put on display—I was first introduced to the magic of Stevie Nicks. Despite the fact that it was an otherwise ordinary day, I have a vivid memory of walking through the local mall with my mom when Fleetwood Mac’s “Sara” came on over the speakers. I must have liked it, because I remember my mom telling me in that moment that I was almost named Sara.
Later, in the early aughts when I was in middle school and Discmans were a thing, Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours was one of my first CDs (in the mix with Ricky Martin and Christina Aguilera, of course), and I would listen to it almost every night before I went to bed.
More than 20 years after my initial discovery, “Sara” is still one of my favorite songs, Rumours my favorite album, and Stevie Nicks—one of the most authentic icons of our time—has been a huge part of my upbringing and how I view myself and the world. But more than just her musical talent, it’s her resilient spirit that has influenced me deeply. Stevie is, in my humble opinion, a lesson in how to be a gracious, respected, strong-ass woman—and how lucky I feel to be, in a sense, her pupil. Likely one of her youngest, but still.
Several decades ago, Stevie had become so terribly addicted to cocaine that it burned a hole in her septum. Doctors warned her of a potential brain hemorrhage had she continued using, so she checked herself into treatment. “I knew I was going to die and I didn’t want to die…I did my 28 days and I came out and I was brilliant,” she said at the time. “I was as strong as an ox and I felt great. I could feel myself starting to glow again and I was totally excited about my life. When I walked through those doors at Betty Ford and they searched me and took away all my stuff, it was like, ‘OK I’m never doing THAT again—because I’m never coming back to a place like this.’”
But following her stay at Betty Ford, a psychiatrist prescribed her the tranquilizer Klonopin to treat her anxiety and curb her cocaine dependency, and Stevie spent the next eight years addicted to the prescription drug, which nearly killed her—again. “I nearly died,” she confessed to The Telegraph. “I molted. My hair turned grey. My skin started to completely peel off. I was in terrible pain. That was the worst period of my life. It was eight completely wasted years of my life,” After admitting herself to the hospital for a 47-day detox, she’s been clean ever since.
Of course, I don’t really know Stevie Nicks, and it feels strange to have such a deep admiration for someone I’ve only met once, very briefly (after the show I captured on my Instagram, below). But she was, for a while, the only living proof I had that one could go through something like that and emerge on the other side not just alive, but stronger. Although I’ve never struggled with addiction per se, I have a long history with eating disorders, and through treatment over the course of the past several years I’ve watched several of my peers die, or stay trapped in the cycle of treatment and relapse. It can get incredibly discouraging. Cheesy as it might sound, time and time again, I’ve found courage and faith in Stevie’s history and reminded myself that if she could conquer her own seemingly insurmountable afflictions and go on to have a happy, successful, meaningful life, I could, too. And long story short, I have, and I am. I credit so much of my own recovery to Stevie, which again, feels both weird but completely natural all at once.
Looking at Stevie Nicks now, in all her sparkly-haired, fairy godmother-esque, mysterious, chiffon-y glory, you’d never know how close she once came to the edge (not the Edge of Seventeen—a different edge). Her tiny 5-foot-1 frame (plus a couple of inches with those signature platform boots, obv) is rapt with radiant energy and fully present on stage, and even at the age of 68 she shows no signs of slowing down. And thank God for that–we need her! Nobody chooses to develop an addiction, or in my case, an eating disorder, but it does take tremendous strength and a conscious choice to overcome, a choice she’s clearly and very admirably made more than just once. She’s had to fight for the life she’s now living, and in doing so has empowered me to do the same.
I suppose I’ll never really know, precisely, what attracted me as a child to Stevie Nicks, who began her craft long before I was even in the womb, but I sure am glad it did. Because in this ever-evolving digital age where most things we consume are carefully-curated or somehow altered (see also: fake news!!!), I feel incredibly grateful to have grown up transfixed by a woman whose raw, timeless talent and sterling qualities are something I would be proud to emulate at every age, from the inside-out–rather than continuing to chase the widespread emptiness of our generation.



Read more: http://stylecaster.com/stevie-nicks-...#ixzz4e1rhjKjU
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  #1352  
Old 04-19-2017, 05:11 AM
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5 Things We Learned About ‘Lust For Life’ from Lana Del Rey’s ‘Dazed’ Cover Story

The album was, as always, executive produced by longtime collaborator Rick Nowels — and it’s got a bit of “a sci-fi flair.”

Rick Nowels. He actually did stuff with Stevie Nicks a while ago. He works really well with women. I did the last few records with him. Even with Ultraviolence which I did with Dan (Auerbach), I did the record first with Rick, and then I went to Nashville and reworked the sound with Dan. So, yeah, Rick Nowels is amazing, and these two engineers – with all the records that I’ve worked on with Rick, they did a lot of the production as well. You would love these two guys. They’re just super-innovative. I wanted a bit of a sci-fi flair for some of the stuff and they had some really cool production ideas.




Read More: 5 Things We Learned About 'Lust For Life' from Lana Del Rey's 'Dazed' Cover Story | http://popcrush.com/lana-del-rey-lus...ckback=tsmclip

Last edited by SisterNightroad : 04-19-2017 at 05:16 AM.
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  #1353  
Old 04-20-2017, 07:38 AM
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Trade Shawls, Scarves And Skirts At Stevie Nicks-Inspired Clothing Swap

ALBANY PARK — Before there was boho, there was Stevie Nicks.

Known as much for her style as her singing, the Fleetwood Mac frontwoman, dubbed the "pop culture fairy godmother of witchy women," is the inspiration behind Thursday night's "Give To Me Your Leather, Take From Me My Lace" clothing swap at Halcyon Theatre.

Comb your closet for shawls, scarves, peasant skirts and anything with velvet, fringe or ruffles — better yet, anything with velvet, fringe and ruffles.

The swap kicks off at 7 p.m. at the theater, 4541 N. Spaulding Ave. Admission is $10 or BYOB.

The organizers are requesting that people bring a minimum of two items and a maximum of six to the swap.

Additional swap tips, courtesy of no less than Oprah:

• Make sure to clean out any pockets first.

• Leave anything stained or in poor condition at home.

• Don't forget accessories (Stevie loves hats!) — bring shoes, jewelry, handbags and other accessories.



https://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/2017...-fashion-style
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  #1354  
Old 04-20-2017, 05:50 PM
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Originally Posted by SisterNightroad View Post
Trade Shawls, Scarves And Skirts At Stevie Nicks-Inspired Clothing Swap

ALBANY PARK — Before there was boho, there was Stevie Nicks.

Known as much for her style as her singing, the Fleetwood Mac frontwoman, dubbed the "pop culture fairy godmother of witchy women," is the inspiration behind Thursday night's "Give To Me Your Leather, Take From Me My Lace" clothing swap at Halcyon Theatre.

Comb your closet for shawls, scarves, peasant skirts and anything with velvet, fringe or ruffles — better yet, anything with velvet, fringe and ruffles.

The swap kicks off at 7 p.m. at the theater, 4541 N. Spaulding Ave. Admission is $10 or BYOB.

The organizers are requesting that people bring a minimum of two items and a maximum of six to the swap.

Additional swap tips, courtesy of no less than Oprah:

• Make sure to clean out any pockets first.

• Leave anything stained or in poor condition at home.

• Don't forget accessories (Stevie loves hats!) — bring shoes, jewelry, handbags and other accessories.



https://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/2017...-fashion-style
This sounds so cool!
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Old 04-20-2017, 11:24 PM
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24karatstevie 24karatstevie is offline
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Originally Posted by lilyfee View Post
This sounds so cool!
I know I want to go!
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  #1356  
Old Yesterday, 06:10 AM
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English twins Ward Thomas on conquering Nashville and how niceness can be 'cool'

Their accents may be more “hoorah” than “yee-hah”, but last autumn Catherine and Lizzy Ward Thomas became the first British country act to top the UK album charts. Now the 23-year-old twins from the sleepy Hampshire village of Liss are gearing up to support Tom Petty and Stevie Nicks when the rock legends play Hyde Park in July. No wonder they’re “a bit dazed”.

“We love Stevie Nicks,” gush the sisters, when I meet them at their publicist’s office in north London. “Fleetwood Mac and the Dixie Chicks are our favourite bands. When we were growing up our parents were in a Seventies covers band. Mum was the singer, she was Stevie Nicks.” The wholesome sincerity of their enthusiasm is irresistible. They’re ridiculously likeable and totally lacking in the diva-esque attitude that was once standard issue in pop stars their age.



http://www.telegraph.co.uk/music/int...-niceness-can/
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