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  #16  
Old 02-02-2015, 01:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Macfanforever View Post
Yes .I like that feature of previewing before you buy.Its like the local record shop in town years ago let you take it for a spin in their turntable before you buy it.

I never had to do that for Stevie records.
Even if was Street Angel?

If I mate with a artist or band, it's a given that I will buy whatever they release. It may not meet my expectations immediately. But with repeated listens I will find some value in it. Sometimes I listen to an album once or twice, then shelve it and forget about it. Years later I will rediscover it give a listen and, in circumspect, end up understanding its place in the span of the band's history, and appreciating or loving it.

Tusk is a good example of that. I was a bit confused when it came out. Most of the songs and they way they were rendered didn't fit my concept of what Fleetwood Mac was. It took years to understand it. It was universally cast as a dud. Now, with the passage of time, the album has risen in status as one of their most artistic works.

If the digital age/iTunes existed then, the Tusk album would have been picked to pieces. After a quick listen, consumers would have the option of choosing to buy only the songs that provided instant gratification. It would hardly be seen as collective body of work, but as a self service " have it your way" menu. That makes more sense for food, but it decimates tradition art forms, which is how I see albums.

I can image the future when this concept could be applied to other art forms.

iArt.com - Purchase new original or vintage paintings, with the option of buying just the portions you like the most.
iFilms.com - Why buy an entire film with scenes that don't appeal to you? Save money by cutting out the slow, boring scenes.
iBooks - Edit and eliminate passages, chapters, or subjects that don't hold your interest. Save valuable time.

Sorry for my stream of thought rambling. I've gone deeply astray from the original topic.

When you hear a s single song that you like from an artist you are unfamiliar with, it is convenient to be able to sample their work before committing to buying their album.
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Last edited by PenguinHead : 02-02-2015 at 03:08 AM.
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  #17  
Old 02-02-2015, 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by PenguinHead View Post
Even if was Street Angel?

If I mate with a artist or band, it's a given that I will buy whatever they release. It may not meet my expectations immediately. But with repeated listens I will find some value in it. Sometimes I listen to an album once or twice, then shelve it and forget about it. Years later I will rediscover it give a listen and, in circumspect, end up understanding its place in the span of the band's history, and appreciating or loving it.

Tusk is a good example of that. I was a bit confused when it came out. Most of the songs and they way they were rendered didn't fit my concept of what Fleetwood Mac was. It took years to understand it. It was universally cast as a dud. Now, with the passage of time, the album has risen in status as one of their most artistic works.

If the digital age/iTunes existed then, the Tusk album would have been picked to pieces. After a quick listen, consumers would have the option of choosing to buy only the songs that provided instant gratification. It would hardly be seen as collective body of work, but as a self service " have it your way" menu. That makes more sense for food, but it decimates tradition art forms, which is how I see albums.

I can image the future when this concept could be applied to other art forms.

iArt.com - Purchase new original or vintage paintings, with the option of buying just the portions you like the most.
iFilms.com - Why buy an entire film with scenes that don't appeal to you? Save money by cutting out the slow, boring scenes.
iBooks - Edit and eliminate passages, chapters, or subjects that don't hold your interest. Save valuable time.

Sorry for my stream of thought rambling. I've gone deeply astray from the original topic.

When you hear a s single song that you like from an artist you are unfamiliar with, it is convenient to be able to sample their work before committing to buying their album.
I think you're not wrong after all.
By the way ibooks already kind of exists since there are Kindle and google books.
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  #18  
Old 02-03-2015, 05:26 AM
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I think you're not wrong after all.
By the way ibooks already kind of exists since there are Kindle and google books.
You are so considerate! I am very aware of ibooks. But when you buy the book, don't you have to purchase the entire book? Why can't you have the option to buy separate chapters? I'm happy you're here, as fellow Italian. You are very fluid in written English. Did you grow up speaking both?
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Last edited by PenguinHead : 02-03-2015 at 05:38 AM.
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  #19  
Old 02-04-2015, 12:52 PM
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Originally Posted by PenguinHead View Post
You are so considerate! I am very aware of ibooks. But when you buy the book, don't you have to purchase the entire book? Why can't you have the option to buy separate chapters? I'm happy you're here, as fellow Italian. You are very fluid in written English. Did you grow up speaking both?
Wordreference is a huge help! By the way I am self-taught. I learned english reading english books, watching english movies, listening to english music and writing in english. I don't speak fluently as I write because I don't happen to find many people to talk with. In fact I understand very well the literal meaning of a conversation but I still find difficult to understand allegorical meaning. For example I don't get a lot of western jokes; people of different countries have very different kinds of humour...

P.S. By the way congratuations, not all the elders are in line with the times about technology. My mother still doesn't know how to close ads.

Last edited by SisterNightroad : 02-04-2015 at 04:59 PM.
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  #20  
Old 02-04-2015, 01:03 PM
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Neil Young Slams Vinyl Sales As ‘Nothing but a Fashion Statement’
by Nick DeRiso February 4, 2015 10:25 AM


Flannel-clad Neil Young might come off as a throwback figure at times, but that doesn’t translate into a passion for vinyl. In fact, Young recently slammed the resurgence in old-fashioned album sales.
At issue for Young, who recently launched his own digital music player called Pono, is the lack of fidelity with these new vinyl releases — especially in relation to his own audio project. Pono, which he calls a “high-resolution digital player,” is capable of storing up to 2,000 hi-res tracks.
A lot of people that buy vinyl today don’t realize that they’re listening to CD masters on vinyl, and that’s because the record companies have figured out that people want vinyl,” Young told the Frame radio show. “And they’re only making CD masters in digital, so all the new products that come out on vinyl are actually CDs on vinyl, which is really nothing but a fashion statement.”
Whichever format you prefer, Young has certainly been giving fans plenty to digest. He released not one but two new studio efforts in 2014. First came March’s ‘A Letter Home,’ a low-tech project recorded at Jack White‘s Nashville studio and record store. The follow-up ‘Storytone,’ issued in November, found Young working in an orchestral format. And he’s reportedly already at work on another album.


Read More: Neil Young Slams Vinyl Sales As 'Nothing but a Fashion Statement' | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/neil-...ckback=tsmclip
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  #21  
Old 02-26-2015, 11:03 AM
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New Music Will Soon Be Released on Fridays
by Dave Lifton February 26, 2015 10:38 AM

There’s going to be a major change to the way new music is released starting this summer. The music industry has decided to streamline the process by making Friday the global release day for new records.
The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPA) made the announcement after discussions with labels and musicians around the world. “Release days currently vary from one country to another, causing frustration for consumers when music fans in other parts of the world can access new releases before them”, they posted on their website. “As well as helping music fans, the move will benefit artists who want to harness social media to promote their new music. It also creates the opportunity to reignite excitement and a sense of occasion around the release of new music.
They believe it will have an added benefit: “The move to an aligned global release day will also reduce the risk of piracy by narrowing the gap between release days in different countries.
Prior to this new decision, every country’s record industry had the authority to set its own release date. Germany and Australia already have the new Friday standard, while in the U.K., new music was available on Mondays. Tuesday has long been the release date in the U.S. Even though experts say the day was chosen to maximize music sales, they disagree on the reasons. NPR Music suggested that it allowed for a full week of sales, because Billboard publishes its charts on Wednesday, while industry writer Mark Berman theorized that it had to do with understanding the mindset of consumers. Record executive Joe McFadden said that it was a way to “level the playing field” by giving distributors time to get the product in stores, and showed a degree of foresight when he noted, “There have been backroom conversations among labels recently about moving the street date to Friday.”
The switch is expected to begin this summer, with new records going on sale one minute after midnight on the day of release.


Read More: New Music Will Soon Be Released on Fridays | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/new-m...ckback=tsmclip
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  #22  
Old 02-26-2015, 12:07 PM
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Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPA) Maybe they sh0uld update their name.Its outdated with the word Phonographic.LOL..............

The release days here are Tuesdays .Don't ask me why they pick Tuesdays for.

I can see where Neil Young is coming from.

They should of recorded the music the old way to make vinyl sound better.

Its like the movie industry putting movies on VHS and Betamax with digitally produced movies.
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  #23  
Old 02-26-2015, 02:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Macfanforever View Post
Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPA) Maybe they sh0uld update their name.Its outdated with the word Phonographic.LOL..............

The release days here are Tuesdays .Don't ask me why they pick Tuesdays for.

I can see where Neil Young is coming from.

They should of recorded the music the old way to make vinyl sound better.

Its like the movie industry putting movies on VHS and Betamax with digitally produced movies.
In my opinion "phonographic" has a certain vintage charm and highlights the origin of the industry, instead of the present that it's very short-lived in the music field.
In Italy release days are Tuesday too!
By the way I'm glad that music industry is trying to fight for album sales in a positive and proactive way instead of hitting out at piracy sites (how do you call them?)
Vinyls of new albums always sounded fishy to me, now Neil Young gave me proof.

Last edited by SisterNightroad : 02-26-2015 at 02:22 PM.
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  #24  
Old 03-12-2015, 10:54 AM
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Jimmy Page Is Not a Fan of the MP3
by Jeff Giles March 12, 2015 10:01 AM


Jimmy Page has been instrumental in bringing Led Zeppelin‘s classic catalog into the digital music era, but that doesn’t mean he’s accepted the limitations of the MP3.
In fact, as he explained during a recent interview with Kerrang! Radio, his decision to painstakingly remaster Zeppelin’s studio albums for the band’s current deluxe reissue series may have been partly motivated by a deep dissatisfaction with the predominant digital file format, which he called the “most annoying” of all modern listening options.
“I’d be confronted with Led Zeppelin music on MP3. It almost sounded like it had been remixed, and not very well at that,” Page argued. Saying the songs lost their “transience and depth” on their way to MP3, he pointed out, “They were mixed in stereo with a depth-of-field to them, with everything in focus. To have it squashed down is not how it was intended to be.”
Lamenting “the jiggery-pokery that goes on” from analog to digital, Page seemed encouraged by the growing number of hi-res format options. “If you review the situation of how things are listened to, and approach vinyl, CDs and digital separately, it’s not one size fits all,” he noted, and predicted that his remastering efforts would future-proof the Zeppelin catalog for years to come. “We’ve got high-resolution files for whatever’s going to come down the line. It was essential to do that, to make sure you don’t have to remaster again for a number of years.”


Read More: Jimmy Page Is Not a Fan of the MP3 | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/jimmy...ckback=tsmclip
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  #25  
Old 03-14-2015, 11:55 AM
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Originally Posted by SisterNightroad View Post
Jimmy Page Is Not a Fan of the MP3
by Jeff Giles March 12, 2015 10:01 AM


Jimmy Page has been instrumental in bringing Led Zeppelin‘s classic catalog into the digital music era, but that doesn’t mean he’s accepted the limitations of the MP3.
In fact, as he explained during a recent interview with Kerrang! Radio, his decision to painstakingly remaster Zeppelin’s studio albums for the band’s current deluxe reissue series may have been partly motivated by a deep dissatisfaction with the predominant digital file format, which he called the “most annoying” of all modern listening options.
“I’d be confronted with Led Zeppelin music on MP3. It almost sounded like it had been remixed, and not very well at that,” Page argued. Saying the songs lost their “transience and depth” on their way to MP3, he pointed out, “They were mixed in stereo with a depth-of-field to them, with everything in focus. To have it squashed down is not how it was intended to be.”
Lamenting “the jiggery-pokery that goes on” from analog to digital, Page seemed encouraged by the growing number of hi-res format options. “If you review the situation of how things are listened to, and approach vinyl, CDs and digital separately, it’s not one size fits all,” he noted, and predicted that his remastering efforts would future-proof the Zeppelin catalog for years to come. “We’ve got high-resolution files for whatever’s going to come down the line. It was essential to do that, to make sure you don’t have to remaster again for a number of years.”


Read More: Jimmy Page Is Not a Fan of the MP3 | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/jimmy...ckback=tsmclip

I agree with Jimmy.They sound like sheet especially when you got to pay for them.

They are just fine to just listen to tunes with an ipod.I would not master my entire music collection with mp3 but I will encode them to wave files.128kbps is the lowest I go with music but I mostly encode at 320kbps.

Stick with Wave since there is no compression .Flac is ok since it alittle loss in the sound quality.
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  #26  
Old 03-14-2015, 04:26 PM
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I notice that Madonna and Kelly Clarkston's new albums are on sale for $7.99. That is pretty horrible. They are just hoping someone buys them. Everytime you think that sales can't get worse, they do.
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  #27  
Old 03-15-2015, 02:57 PM
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Since I store and listen to music on my laptop I prefer to keep Mp3 formats because otherwise I woud overexert my pc; it's not so bad because not all MP3s are ****ty, but if i could transfer everything on CD it wouldn't be worth.
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  #28  
Old 03-25-2015, 11:48 AM
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New Steve Jobs Bio Claims He Hated Neil Young
by Jeff Giles March 25, 2015 11:46 AM

The public picture that’s been painted of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs is one of a brilliant entrepreneur with a distinctly ruthless streak, so it isn’t hard to imagine that he’d be annoyed by Neil Young‘s long crusade against the compressed audio that Apple’s iTunes store helped popularize.
According to the Daily Beast, that’s exactly what happened after Young went public with his distaste for lossy file formats. Quoting from the new biography Becoming Steve Jobs, which is written by Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli, the Beast offers a peek into how Jobs reacted after Young referred to iTunes’ audio as “compromised.”
F— Neil Young, and f— his records,” Jobs reportedly fumed, claiming he was angry because Young had the nerve to “pop off in public like that without coming to talk to us about his technical concerns first.
To his credit, Young didn’t just grouse about 21st century audio. He labored over his long-discussed Archives series for years before settling on Blu-ray as his preferred hi-res media format for the first volume, released as a 10-disc set in the summer of 2009 — and then he went a step further, lending his backing and approval to a heavily hyped, Kickstarter-backed high definition player dubbed the Pono.
In fact, after Jobs’ death in October 2011, Young claimed that toward the end of Jobs’ life, the two had been working together on an Apple device that could have made the Pono unnecessary. “Steve Jobs was a pioneer of digital music, but when he went home he listened to vinyl,” said Young. “I have to believe if he’d lived long enough, he would have tried to do what I’m trying to do.


Read More: New Steve Jobs Bio Claims He Hated Neil Young | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/steve...ckback=tsmclip
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  #29  
Old 03-25-2015, 01:03 PM
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Roadies Flourish During Record Industry’s Decline
by Jeff Giles March 25, 2015 12:55 PM

As music fans buy fewer albums and bands increasingly turn to concert revenue to make a living, one largely unseen sector of the industry is enjoying enhanced job security: roadies.
As a new Wall Street Journal report points out, the 21st century rise of the roadie reflects an overall shift in the industry that’s wiping out “cultural middlemen” like label executives while rewarding those with the skills to be “technical middlemen” between artists and their audience. It isn’t the flashiest type of employment, and for some — like managers and promoters — there can be a fair amount of risk involved, but the opportunities are definitely still there.
Citing reports from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Berklee College of Music, the WSJ places roadies — or “concert technicians,” as they’re increasingly known — in a fairly broad economic spectrum that can average between $57,000 and $175,000 a year, depending on one’s position. As an example, the article points to 40-year vet Tom Weber, who got his start filling in for a no-show crew member at a Kiss concert and is now an in-demand guitar tech who numbers Eddie Van Halen and Lyle Lovett among his clients.
While Weber’s one case of a tech near the top of his field, there are plenty of opportunities on the ground floor — and as the article notes, “few roadie jobs require formal credentials, so candidates with limited skills or experience can apply.” It adds up to a flourishing subset of a business that’s often portrayed as being on the continual verge of collapse.
“Employment opportunities in the live-music industry have never been better,” insisted Pollstar editor Gary Bongiovanni in the WSJ‘s report. “While record-company jobs have nearly disappeared, road- and tech-production-crew gigs continue to grow.”


Read More: Roadies Flourish During Record Industry's Decline | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/roadi...ckback=tsmclip
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  #30  
Old 03-26-2015, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by SisterNightroad View Post
Roadies Flourish During Record Industry’s Decline
by Jeff Giles March 25, 2015 12:55 PM

As music fans buy fewer albums and bands increasingly turn to concert revenue to make a living, one largely unseen sector of the industry is enjoying enhanced job security: roadies.
As a new Wall Street Journal report points out, the 21st century rise of the roadie reflects an overall shift in the industry that’s wiping out “cultural middlemen” like label executives while rewarding those with the skills to be “technical middlemen” between artists and their audience. It isn’t the flashiest type of employment, and for some — like managers and promoters — there can be a fair amount of risk involved, but the opportunities are definitely still there.
Citing reports from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Berklee College of Music, the WSJ places roadies — or “concert technicians,” as they’re increasingly known — in a fairly broad economic spectrum that can average between $57,000 and $175,000 a year, depending on one’s position. As an example, the article points to 40-year vet Tom Weber, who got his start filling in for a no-show crew member at a Kiss concert and is now an in-demand guitar tech who numbers Eddie Van Halen and Lyle Lovett among his clients.
While Weber’s one case of a tech near the top of his field, there are plenty of opportunities on the ground floor — and as the article notes, “few roadie jobs require formal credentials, so candidates with limited skills or experience can apply.” It adds up to a flourishing subset of a business that’s often portrayed as being on the continual verge of collapse.
“Employment opportunities in the live-music industry have never been better,” insisted Pollstar editor Gary Bongiovanni in the WSJ‘s report. “While record-company jobs have nearly disappeared, road- and tech-production-crew gigs continue to grow.”


Read More: Roadies Flourish During Record Industry's Decline | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/roadi...ckback=tsmclip
Wow.Thats interesting.Thanks for sharing.

The Mac is keeping their crew employed which is great.

It looks like fans rather see live shows then playing albums.

I cant say to much about the current artists outings because I'm not a fan of any but this is one good reason that the Mac is doing so great with this tour and thanks to Chris returning and making it happen for them.

I hope the Mac will win the tour of the year at the end of the year with Pollstar and Billboard.
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