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  #1  
Old 02-13-2018, 04:15 PM
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Thumbs up 2019, 40yrs of LB's Turner Model 1

sharing a post from Rick Turner about his plans for 40th anniversary of Lindsey getting his first Turner Model 1 (more q&a at the link, for people interesting in follow-up questions):

https://www.facebook.com/groups/8972...4539129660575/

Rick Turner

Just a bit of an advanced notice. 2019 will mark the 40th anniversary of Lindsey getting his first Turner Model 1...the very one seen up at the top here. We're planning on making a limited edition of Anniversary LB guitars as close to old #3 (his first) as possible including the trapeze tailpiece. Stay tuned!
Rick Turner, luthier
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Old 02-14-2018, 01:45 PM
tango87 tango87 is offline
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How very lovely. I imagine it will be profoundly expensive...

I dream of one day being a good enough guitarist to deserve one of these!
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Old 02-20-2018, 06:12 PM
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Originally Posted by tango87 View Post
How very lovely. I imagine it will be profoundly expensive...

I dream of one day being a good enough guitarist to deserve one of these!
Hey now, you don't have to be a good enough guitarist to own one! 😄 I have one!

Seriously though, my instrument is better than the player... Am interested in this 40th edition but afraid that I'd never play it on tour. I'm so afraid.
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Old 02-21-2018, 02:03 AM
bombaysaffires bombaysaffires is offline
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Originally Posted by tango87 View Post
How very lovely. I imagine it will be profoundly expensive...
but organically so..... in a way, it will bring things full circle
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Old 01-03-2019, 06:22 PM
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https://jazzguitartoday.com/2019/01/...medium=twitter

PRODUCT ANNOUNCEMENTS

Rick Turner Limited Edition Lindsey Buckingham Guitar

JGT Newsroom Published 3 hours ago on January 3, 2019 By JGT Newsroom

Legendary luthier Rick Turner commemorates 40 years of the famed Model 1 guitar.

The guitar that Fleetwood Mac’s Lindsey Buckingham brought to international attention continues to be one of the most exquisite, road ready and versatile electric guitars on the market. With the 40th Anniversary Edition, Rick has brought back some of the features that he originally built for Lindsey in 1979:

  • Body: Honduras Mahogany “clam shell”, black celluloid binding
  • Neck: Maple & Purpleheart five piece laminate
  • Fingerboard: Brazilian rosewood with white mother of pearl top dots, brass side dots, black celluloid binding, Jescar medium fretwire
  • Peghead Front: Mahogany veneer, black celluloid bound
  • Multi-layer peghead “back strap overlay”…as was updated on #3
  • Turner humbucker pickup
  • D-TAR Eclipse preamp with Turner EQ
  • Lindsey’s signature on upper bout of face in silver ink

Only 18 of these 40th Anniversary Models will be produced. The 40th Anniversary Model 1 will debut at the NAMM show in January of 2019. MSRP is $8500 and, with Lindsey’s support, 5% of proceeds will be donated to Guitars in the Classroom, a non-profit which trains general education teachers in public schools from coast to coast to play guitar to help facilitate learning in the classroom.

rickturnerguitars.com
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Old 01-19-2019, 06:08 PM
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this is 2 years old so may have been posted already but can't find where - very very nice reading on Rick Turner working with John McVie first and how he and Lindsey slowly worked their way toward M1 -

https://rickturnerblog.com/2016/02/0...bcIVUBbHz3EW4Y

FEBRUARY 1, 2016
Fleetwood Mac, Lindsey Buckingham, and the Birth of the Turner Model 1 Guitar

In 1976 I got a call at Alembic from John McVie of Fleetwood Mac. The band was ensconced at the Record Plant in Sausalito to record their second album, to be known as “Rumours,” with Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks, and John invited me down to meet them all, check out the setup on his early Alembic bass, and also see to anything that Lindsey’s Les Paul and Strat might need. Visit I did, and I quickly became very at home with the band and their studio crew of Ken Caillat, Richard Dashut, and Rick Sanchez, as well as guitar tech Ray Lindsey. I visited frequently, partaking in the crazy hospitality, and found that I had a lot in common with Lindsey when it came to musical influences. It might have helped that we were all in a similar state of personal disarray; I, too, was going through a major marital breakup with my wife, Gail, at that point. At least I wasn’t trying to make an album with her at the time!

On one of the funnier nights there in Sausalito, we were all sitting in the control room when in came an excited Richard Dashut with the latest copy of Billboard. “Number one! We’re number one!!” “What?” was the general response. The band’s previous album, “Fleetwood Mac,” their first with Stevie and Lindsey, had been released a year before this, and the band had pretty much forgotten about it, with all the drama and creativity flowing at the Record Plant. Also, at that time, if an album didn’t really take off in six weeks or so, it was destined for failure. The band had written it off, but suddenly they had the hottest selling album on the charts.

This happened the same month Mick and John’s lawsuit against their former manager was settled in their favor. A couple of years before this, at a point when there was barely a band, it being down to Mick, John, and Christine, their manager had hired a bogus bunch of musicians and put them out on the road as “Fleetwood Mac.” Mick and John sued, but in a countersuit, all of their recording royalties from Warner Brothers wound up in an escrow account. The band had to scramble and try to survive on live gigs with a succession of guitar players. When Lindsey and Stevie joined the band, they were doing a lot of covers of earlier iterations of Fleetwood Mac’s material. The new songs that Lindsey and Stevie brought to the “Fleetwood Mac” album changed the direction of the band, but the real impact didn’t hit until they were in Sausalito recording Rumours. Suddenly they were the number one band in the world, and a couple of years worth of royalties broke loose.

John started buying Alembic basses that I’d bring to the studio, and they included the very first carbon fiber necked instrument, a short scale bass in the shape now made famous by Stanley Clarke, and a long scale fretless with a stainless steel fingerboard which can be heard on “The Chain” from Rumours. It’s the one used in the bass intro to the song outro—bum, ba ba bum ba ba ba ba ba booooommmmm before Lindsey’s screaming Strat comes in.

For Lindsey, my main contribution during Rumours was installing an Alembic “Stratoblaster” in his Strat exactly like the one I’d put in Lowell George’s guitar, the one you hear on Little Feat’s live album, “Waiting for Columbus.” For Lindsey, the sound of the electric on Rumours is his guitar with the ‘Blaster gain all the way up, basically destroying a succession of HiWatt amps. Evidently, the HiWatts did not have adequate current protection; they were fine with normal electric guitar output levels, but when we boosted that by nearly 12 dB, the amplifier just tried to pull more and more current through the power transformer, and after about 20 or 30 minutes of high gain sustaining guitar solo, the transformers would literally go up in smoke. Luckily, they had three of them, and every day one would go off to Prune Music to be repaired.

I had started to confront the flaws in the Alembic guitars after meeting Lindsey; we talked guitars a lot, and I built him an Alembic—a beauty—all white with black chrome hardware. But I had known for some time that there was something fundamental in the design that made the Alembic design great for bass but not friendly for guitar players; this was painfully evidenced by our 20-to-1 ratio of bass to guitar production. Most people I discussed this with thought it was inherent in the low impedance pickup and active electronics design; they thought the sound was just too clean for the average rock’n’roll guitar player. While I thought that this theory might have some merit, I still saw the problem as being deeper than that. After all, with the Alembic variable tone control filter it was possible to kind of superimpose the frequency response of a Strat, Tele, or Gibson humbucker over the wide band response of the Alembic pickup, yet that still didn’t sound right. I came to believe that the strings just weren’t moving the right way, being coupled as they were to a heavy bridge set on a sustain block and then to the stiff and high-frequency resonant neck laminate that went through the body from the peghead to the butt. The very construction feature that made Alembics stand out visually and aurally in a positive way was working against us when it came to making a warm and seductive guitar. Further discussions with Lindsey who had purchased an Alembic guitar confirmed my feelings, and I set out to design a completely new instrument.

The trick in a game like this—designing from scratch—is to climb down off the particular design tree you’ve been exploring and go find a new tree. You have to really get back down to the very ground and try to a) forget everything you’ve been doing, and b) don’t forget anything because it might be useful. It requires that you logically justify each and every little decision, and that you do nothing just because “that’s how it’s done” or because “that’s what I know how to do.” It means that you have to start with the results you hope to achieve and work backward, always keeping an open mind, but also trying to work with what you know and what you’ve learned from other people, other instruments, and of things completely outside the musical instrument world.

For me it meant wanting to make a guitar that would combine the warmth I liked in Les Pauls and SGs with the clarity that comes from a Strat, and then I wanted to put a kind of acoustic overlay on that sound as well as the look. I wanted to make an electric guitar that would appeal to an acoustic guitarist used to fine old Martins, Larsons, and Gibsons, and yet would be capable of the kind of full bore electric tones that players like Peter Green, Eric Clapton, and of course, Lindsey Buckingham could get. I guess if you could express the sound I wanted it would be like lemon butter—rich with a tangy touch. And this sound had to be inherent in the instrument itself; it could not be achieved with any old plank of wood by putting just the right pickup on it. It’s all in how the guitar affects the string vibration—that back and forth feedback loop between wire and wood.

I started with the most obvious place, the body. I needed to get away from that neck-through body thing; it did not allow enough contribution from the body wood to warm up the sound. My favorite sounding electrics were the old Les Paul custom—the original version with the all-mahogany body and no maple cap—and the Gibson SG, though I thought it punked out below about “B” on the “A” string and above about “B” on the high “E” string. The common theme between the two instruments is the mahogany body, a well loved instrument wood that can impart a dry tone to acoustic guitars, but a warmer tone with the thicker pieces used in electrics. I also wanted to bring the average weight of the new guitar in at between that of a Les Paul and a Strat—no use sending the players to the chiropractor after every gig. In thinking over what I’d learned about PA speaker cabinet building, echo chamber design and such, I realized that parallel surfaces lead to standing waves, even in solid structures, and that made me wonder if the problem with the SG’s narrower response might be that the parallel surfaces might lead to some kinds of issues with limiting the frequency response, or having resonances too pronounced. These considerations brought me to the idea of arching the surfaces of the top and back, and doing it based on one of the main design features of my favorite vintage acoustic guitars, the cylinder topped Howe-Ormes from the 1890s.

I drew up a set of blueprints for a new guitar that would have a “set” glued-in neck and a mahogany body. For the warmth I liked in the Les Paul customs and SGs, the body was to be mahogany, and I realized I could make a “clam shell” of two body halves with each being 1-¼” thick in the center; that just happened to be the thickness of an Alembic bass body center section on which we glued a ¼” thick top and back. Thus it would use a common lumber dimension with what we were already using. For the neck, I realized that every Alembic bass neck yielded a piece of laminated scrap approximately 20” long, 2-¼” wide, and that could be thicknessed to ¾”. By stacking a heel block on and then scarfing on a peghead, this was perfect for a 15 frets-to-the-body neck that would have the stiffness characteristics—and somewhat the tonal properties of a Strat neck. It would be stiff and not absorb much string vibration, and with a rosewood fingerboard, it would balance the mahogany body nicely. I showed the drawings to Lindsey, discussed the idea of a single pickup with semi-parametric EQ, made a few minor changes, and did a final blueprint. When I took the ‘print down to the studio, Lindsey said, “I’ll take one as soon as you have it done.”

Not long after this, but before I got a chance to build a prototype Model 1, things at Alembic went South…way South. There were a lot of irregularities on the business side of things; there was a lot of money apparently missing; and I instituted an audit and discovered that things were not as they should have been. I wanted an official audit to be done by an independent accountant; I was overruled and subsequently fired for rocking the boat. I learned the age-old lesson that 43% ownership is not 51%, and if the 14% owner had personal reasons for not wanting the boat rocked, well, tough **** for me.

Luckily, I’d moved several years worth of canceled checks to my house where a couple of people and I were digging into how checks had been “coded” and accounted for in the company books. It was not a pretty picture, and I got an attorney involved and moved the accounting to his office. A week later an arsonist burned down my house in Santa Rosa on Pearl Harbor day of 1978. Eventually I settled with Alembic for a financial payout plus taking the design of the Model 1 and my share of the carbon fiber neck patent with me. I learned at that point that you can have justice or get paid, but not necessarily get both at the same time.

As all this was going on, I decided to start up a new guitar company, and so, with the settlement money and the insurance from the house, I started up Turner Guitars with my then-brother-in-law as a junior partner. We set up a shop in Ignacio, in Marin County, and tooled up to build Model 1 guitars. My pal Larry Robinson managed to buy about 300 of the neck scrap laminates from Alembic without them knowing that the parts were going to me; I had my old friend and former employee Jim Furman design the preamp/EQ electronics; and Bill and Pat Bartolini agreed to make the humbucker I’d designed, as I was no longer set up to wind my own pickups.

By the end of summer of 1979 I was finishing up the first three prototypes of the Model 1 guitar, and I knew that Fleetwood Mac was going to start the Tusk tour near the end of October. I called Ray Lindsey, Lindsey Buckingham’s guitar tech, and let him know that I had a guitar for him to try out. Ray invited me to come down to Hollywood to the sound stage where the band was rehearsing. I got there on the early side, before the band got in; Ray checked out the guitar and loved it, and he left it plugged in and put it up on a stand plugged in front of Lindsey’s amps, and we walked to the back of the place (it had once been the site of Esther Williams gigantic swimming pool!) and just sat and chatted. Lindsey came in first, went up on stage, picked up the guitar and played it for about a half an hour before the rest of the band came in. I thought it sounded fantastic—exactly the sound I’d had in my head when I first started designing the guitar. Lindsey then shouted back to Ray, “Leave the Les Paul, the Strat, and the Ovation at home. This is all I need now!” Well, ****ing make my day! Then the rest of the band came in and started to rehearse. The guitar just sat perfectly in the mix on any and all tunes. Lindsey could play it clean like an acoustic, get a bit more edge, kind of like he was playing a Strat with a clean tone, or crank it up full bore with Santana-like sustain. It did the trick. After about an hour, Mick came back and said, “OK, Rick, you did it. How fast can we get a backup for that guitar?”

Thanks to Paul Hostetter for editing
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Old 02-23-2019, 02:09 AM
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https://heartbreakerguitars.com/blog...KMYV1p2s97njCg
The Model 1 from Rick Turner Guitars
February 19, 2019Daniel Odle
Forward by Brendan Smyth (Owner, Heartbreaker Guitars):

"I have known Rick since 1999 when I bought my first Turner Model 1 guitar. I’ll never forget the conversation. I was seeking out the elusive Model 1 (they were hard to get at the time). I called the shop. He informed me there was a 2 year wait for a new Model 1. Are you kidding me?!!! And then he said… “Oh, but I have one that's slightly used that just came back from a studio in LA I could sell you.” I jumped at the chance. The guitar showed up. I’ll never forget the feeling when I opened the case. At the time the guitars were simply a mystery. Nobody knew much about them, let alone where to find one. I was simply entranced with Lindsey Buckingham's guitar playing and I had to see and play this guitar for myself. Unlatching the buckles of the case, I slowly opened it. Excalibur was revealed to me. The guitar was so much more beautiful in person. I could not believe the beauty of the guitar. I didn’t need to play it. I just knew it. I had made the right decision. I had purchased a guitar I could not afford that I would own for the rest of my life. I treasured this guitar for many years long before I had eventually created a friendship with Rick Turner. As my Turner collection grew I got to know Rick.

"In 2011 when I decided to open my own guitar store, there was no question where I would start. A quick phone call to Turner Guitars and I was off and running. In our second year in business we became the #1 Rick Turner Dealer. I'm proud to say, 8 years later we are still going strong. We have done many custom “1 off” guitars with Rick, as well as many Limited Editions: The Santa Cruz Series, The Icon Series, The RT 50, The Turner Twins and more.

"My Blog writer, Daniel Odle had been bugging me to do a new blog on Rick for months, but I wanted to wait for the release of the 40th Anniversary Lindsey Buckingham Guitars before we wrote about him. Well, the first one will be revealed this month and we’ll be getting it here at Heartbreaker Guitars.
The 40th Anniversary Lindsey Buckingham Guitar is a replica of Serial #79-003. This was the first Model 1 Rick built for Lindsey in 1979 that later went on to define the sound of legendary rock band Fleetwood Mac. This will be the closest representation of the original since Rick started building the guitar. Its got a Honduran Mahogany body, a Brazilian Rosewood fingerboard, a Trapeze tail piece and RT electronics. It's signed by Lindsey Buckingham himself! It will be a collectors piece for the ages!

"Congratulations to Rick on an incredible career. He does what he loves and it shows. More importantly, on behalf of all the Turner fans out there, I would like to say thank you. Thank you for creating a guitar that inspires us. As a collector I have many guitars. The Model 1 continues to bring me new songs, new ideas, new inspiration and just plain joy of playing. It sits on my wall where I can admire it every day. On the days I don’t play it, it still brings me joy. The joy of a guitar like this can not be easily explained to a non-player, but the people out there who have been so lucky to own one know. So once again, Rick, I say… Thank you!"
- Brendan Smyth of Heartbreaker Guitars
____________

In reading Brendan’s words, I took it upon myself to not only look deeper inside some of these amazing guitars, but also to see how this incredible journey began for the Model 1, Rick Turner and his guitar company.

Turner was a sophomore in high school in 1959, still just a kid, when he bought and restored his first stringed instrument. He found an old banjo, disassembled it, varnished and restored it using parts borrowed from both his and his Father’s workshops. The town he grew up in was a boat-building town and making or modifying things on a daily basis was common practice. While Turner built rubber band-powered airplanes and blew things up with fireworks (as many of us can relate to), his father used his shop as an artist, a painter and plunking musician. During either of their projects, there would always be guitar music playing. Whether driven by his own curiosity or forced on him by his surroundings, Rick never put the stringed instruments down and a few years later while attending Boston University, Turner found himself deep in the folk revival of the late 50’s visiting coffee shops while his classmates kept to their studies. His integration into the folk music world was amplified when Rick decided, of all things, to make custom guitar straps. It was the String Instrument Workshop, a repair facility in Boston at the time, that found his straps worthy of a larger audience, and offered to carry his product if he’d produce a larger number. Quick to jump on the opportunity, Turner landed himself a job, and as his presence became more steady, the shop decided to test his abilities with random repair jobs as they entered the shop. This was another turning point that would eventually shape the future for Rick Turner.
It was in 1965 that Turner began his traveling gigs as a part-time musician. While the charts were littered with big names like The Rolling Stones, The Righteous Brothers, Elvis Presley and The Beatles, Rick played along side a Canadian folk singer and made his way through clubs, music festivals, quickly moving up the ranks and even performing at the Hollywood Bowl. It was at the end of his tour that Turner found himself in New York and began his first experimentation with the building of his own electric guitar.

Rick’s entrepreneurial spirit was tested in 1969 when he was introduced to The Grateful Dead and Augustus Owsley Stanley III, a legendary audio engineer for The Dead credited with the development of the famous 'Wall of Sound' and the band’s famous skull logo. Owsley had a vision of bringing musicians, technicians, engineers and artisans together to make a new generation of gear. In 1970, Turner took that idea along with Ron and Bob Mathews, fellow Dead technicians and engineers, and formally created Alembic Incorporated. Their combination of sound engineering skills and custom instrument building and modification with The Grateful Dead got them attention from Jefferson Airplane, Crosby, Stills and Nash and many more. After a move to Cotati, California and the purchase of a recording studio in San Francisco as well as a well-timed article in Rolling Stone Magazine titled “Sound Wizards to the Grateful Dead,” it didn’t take long for the flood gates to open for Alembic. Custom orders came in from all directions. Orders from Santana, Stanley Clarke and the Who to Emerson, Lake and Palmar and even Led Zepplin. Even with the seemingly endless success and attention from such big names in the industry, Turner was getting reviews of his guitars sounding “cold and sterile” and he had enough. Rick loved the warm mahogany of the Les Paul’s custom body but sought more clarity, like what you’d find in a Fender Stratocaster. As the 1970’s reached it’s final years, Turner had been working independently with clients and among his loyal clients was John McVie of Fleetwood Mac. With the bass projects from three or four Alembic basses, he’d also done some side work on all of Lindsey Buckingham’s Strats.
When Rick shared the ideas for the new project with Lindsey, he quickly requested one of his own to try out when they were finished. Turner returned with what we now know as The Model 1 during a soundcheck for Fleetwood Mac’s Tusk tour, and after playing just a short time on the new model, Buckingham allegedly abandon his other guitars and made his new Rick Turner Model 1 his go-to guitar. For almost 22 years, it held the spotlight on stage.The Model 1’s iconic sound, rich history and beautiful craftsmanship have influenced Turner to make as little modifications to the original release as possible. On a new model you’ll find the offered addition of a piezo pickup system. An improved bridge on the front finishes off the changes, as the rest of the guitar is just about identical to what was introduced cover 40 years ago. A closer look at the bones of this guitar are in order.

The body shape was inspired by an 1825 European guitar that Turner had in his collection. He added the cutaway and the basic shape was born. With the body being made of solid Honduras Mahogany, Turner decided to arch both the front and back of the body to reduce weight. The neck is constructed of Maple and Purple Heart with a Brazilian Rosewood fretboard.

For the electronics you’ll find a single humbucking pickup, custom made in house by Turner himself, and a series of active electronics. Due to Lindsey Buckingham’s satisfaction of Turner’s previous addition of a pre-amp to Lindsey’s Stratocaster, Rick decided to include it in the Model 1 in combination with a switchable semi-parametric equalizer, a volume control, passive tone control and a frequency/boost cut control. The new release of the Model 1 features a push-pull tone control, allowing the player to switch the humbucker to a single coil for a bit more versatility, tone-wise.

On the face of Lindsey Buckingham’s original model one, with closer inspection, you’ll see some slight modifications to the electronics. The passive tone control and output jack have both been relocated, mimicking what you’d find on the updated model.

In the video down below, Brendan gives you the rundown of a few of these newly released Model 1 variations that he's lucky enough to currently have in stock at Heartbreaker Guitars in Las Vegas.

The first of the four models is the Rick Turner Model 1 Standard in Honduran Mahogany. As the most affordable model, it has black binding on the front side only, single piece maple neck and basic tuners, yet the same body shape, pickup and layout as the other more complex models. The second model featured in the video is the Rick Turner Model 1 Lindsey Buckingham. Also featuring a Honduran Mahogany body, the color of this guitar features a burgundy red stain which has quite the history with Buckingham's guitars. This more extensive model has black binding on the front and back sides, laminated Maple and Purple Heart neck, Gotoh tuners, ebony backstrap overlay and a bound fretboard. The electronics have the same volume and tone control knobs, but also included are the parametric eq and boost/cut and eq functions.


Next of the featured models is an absolute stunner. The Rick Turner 40th Anniversary Model 1 Lindsey Buckingham Edition. This guitar has 'throw back' written all over it with its natural wood grain, original 1979 styling, but updated features and a beautiful, actual, white signature from the man himself, Lindsey Buckingham. This model was released to the public in Anaheim at NAMM 2019 just last month and Heartbreaker Guitars holds the first available in the United States with 6 (of just 18 being made) on order. The final model presented to us in the video, and one of Brendan's personal favorites, is the Rick Turner Model 1 Sinker Series Featherweight (#5 of 5). This guitar gets its name from the pound and half lighter, cedar core.

This featherweight features a blend control piezo knob, and in combination with the light weight body the guitar has an almost acoustic feel to it making it one of the more unique Model 1s available.




Hopefully, you were able to watch the video and allow Brendan to make his surprise announcement himself, but just in case you missed it, here it is: Heartbreaker Guitars has the original 1979 Model 1 played by Lindsey Buckingham while on tour with Fleetwood Mac... FOR SALE! This guitar is one of only three made and believed to be the only of the three left in existence. The guitar is rich in history with Lindsey's personal modifications, slight differences from the newly released Model 1s and the long list of incredible stories that come free with this historical guitar. To make push this collector's item over the top, the guitar has remained playable over the last 40 plus years and will most definitely find itself in the hands of an admirer soon. Before signing out, I must make a personal request to all those who are fans of Lindsey Buckingham as either an accomplished artist or fellow human being that's touched so many people through his music over the span of his lifetime and career. Lindsey's wife, Kristen Buckingham, posted on social media some news concering her husband's health that has left the music world a bit shaken:


The post reads:

I am sad to say that late last week Lindsey underwent emergency open heart surgery. He is now recuperating at home and each day he is stronger than the last. While he and his heart are doing well, the surgery resulted in vocal cord damage. While it is is unclear if this damage is permanent, we are hopeful it is not.

This past year has been a very stressful and difficult year for our family to say the least. But despite all this, our gratitude for life trumps all obstacles we have faced at this moment. We feel so fortunate he’s alive. As does he. He looks forward to recovery and putting this behind him. Needless to say, all touring and shows currently scheduled have been put on pause for the moment as he gathers the strength to heal completely.

Our family thought it important to share what’s happening with Lindsey with the hope that inspires someone else to seek preventative care. Lindsey’s family has a history of heart issues, having lost both his father at 56 and his brother at 46 to heart related illness. If anyone is experiencing even the mildest of symptoms we encourage you to seek the care of a physician.

We are so thankful for the kind and generous love given by the people surrounding Lindsey, me and our kids throughout this emotional time. We can’t thank you enough for all you did for our family. We will never forget you. XO

- Kristen Buckingham



In whatever way you deem appropriate, please take a moment to put Lindsey and his family in your thoughts as they push for his speedy recovery.

If you're interested in one of the featured Rick Turner Model 1 guitars featured above or any of the others now in stock at Heartbreaker Guitars, you can see them online here or visit them in person at their amazing show room in Las Vegas, Nevada. They are a proud Rick Turner Guitars dealer and would be beyond happy to help you find more information on these exquisite guitars.

Daniel Odle
DannyOdle@gmail.com
Heartbreaker Guitars Contributor
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Old 02-23-2019, 02:15 AM
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Old 03-01-2019, 11:37 PM
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demonstrations and detail:
Premier Guitar: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3QVfJmwrIo
Heartbreaker Guitars: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bxfm0vYT9cs

Last edited by cbBen; 03-01-2019 at 11:46 PM..
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Old 03-02-2019, 01:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cbBen View Post
demonstrations and detail:
Premier Guitar: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3QVfJmwrIo
Heartbreaker Guitars: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bxfm0vYT9cs
I really enjoyed the Heartbreaker Guitar video. They must be Rick's main outlet. I used to follow them on FB, but they posted WAY too much, so I eventually unliked their page.
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I will CRUSH YOU!!!! KAREN BRING ME MY FLIP PHONE!
And I'm David, not Homer!(we all should be able to change our name, at least once)
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