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Old 08-01-2015, 10:29 AM
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aleuzzi aleuzzi is offline
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Default Night Watch

I was blaring "Night Watch" from my car radio last night, listened to it three times in a row. While I have always loved the song, I think last night was the first time I truly experienced its full sonic textures--all those harmonies in the second half, the frenetic guitar figures weaving through the steady, eerie bottom supplied by bass/drums/piano, the seamless shifts from CSNY-ish acid folk to an unexpected tour of the underworld to a breathtaking drum and guitar-driven climax that flames, bursts like a shattered star and then dies away on a wave of African drums. It occurred to me that this is the first song in the Fleetwood Mac catalogue to exploit the full range of possibilities in a studio. No song before this demonstrates as much engineered sophistication or polish. One can see how the production helps shape the construction of the song. It's truly remarkable in this way. An unheralded classic.
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Old 08-10-2015, 02:41 PM
dino dino is offline
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Originally Posted by aleuzzi View Post
I was blaring "Night Watch" from my car radio last night, listened to it three times in a row. While I have always loved the song, I think last night was the first time I truly experienced its full sonic textures--all those harmonies in the second half, the frenetic guitar figures weaving through the steady, eerie bottom supplied by bass/drums/piano, the seamless shifts from CSNY-ish acid folk to an unexpected tour of the underworld to a breathtaking drum and guitar-driven climax that flames, bursts like a shattered star and then dies away on a wave of African drums. It occurred to me that this is the first song in the Fleetwood Mac catalogue to exploit the full range of possibilities in a studio. No song before this demonstrates as much engineered sophistication or polish. One can see how the production helps shape the construction of the song. It's truly remarkable in this way. An unheralded classic.
Good track! Don't forget Peter Green's mournful guitar part (the guitar with echo on).
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