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  #16  
Old 07-02-2013, 10:25 AM
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The studio version has a resonator guitar and different percussion. I suspect it may even have 6 string bass but it's hard to tell.

I suspect it is the performance that goes along with this interview:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKSIz4Gqhjo
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  #17  
Old 08-19-2013, 11:32 AM
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http://www.superdeluxeedition.com/ne...us-seven-inch/

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A new vinyl box set that gathers together Fleetwood Mac‘s output from 1969 to 1972 will be issued on 19 August 2013.

The set starts with the band’s third album (their first for Warners) Then Play On (1969) and contains three further records: Kiln House (1970), Future Games (1971) and Bare Trees (1972). A bonus seven-inch replica of 1969 single Oh Well – Pt. 1 is also included.

Although these aren’t heavyweight pressings (140g), Chris Bellman at Bernie Grundman Mastering cut the lacquers for all four albums and the packaging is promised to replicate the originals, including gatefolds for Then Play On and Kiln House. The five records are housed in an attractive looking black slip-case.

An expanded CD reissue of the Then Play On album will be issued on the same date, featuring four bonus tracks: parts one and two of Oh Well, The Green Manalishi (With The Two Prong Crown) and World In Harmony, which is available on CD for the first time.
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  #18  
Old 08-20-2013, 01:39 PM
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So.....has anyone went out and bought this today? Any impressions you wish to share? I plan on picking it up after work.

This will be my formal introduction to all four albums!
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  #19  
Old 08-23-2013, 12:21 PM
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Review with pictures: http://www.superdeluxeedition.com/re...et/#more-20329

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Out this week, is this rather splendid Fleetwood Mac 1969 to 1972 vinyl box set. We posted the details back in July but have now had the opportunity to take a look (and listen) close-up.

The four albums (Then Play On, Kiln House, Future Games and Bare Trees) are not heavyweight pressings (140g), but are excellent nonetheless, with all our records being flat and sounding nice and quiet when played (Chris Bellman at Bernie Grundman Mastering cut the lacquers for all four albums). The original Reprise labels look the part, but the outstanding feature is the quality of the card sleeves. They are very thick and the artwork reproduction, which can so often let reissues down, is first class. Then Play On and Kiln House are both original gatefolds, with the latter coming with a booklet insert.

The bonus seven-inch of Oh Well, has a jukebox-style hole, so you’re going to need an adaptor to play that. In case you’re wondering, there is no special wallet or place for the single, it just comes slotted in amongst the LPs. The slipcase is attractively designed and is sturdy enough to hold everything securely.

The only real negative with this set are the cheap, plain paper inner sleeves. They are awful. Pulling the vinyl out first time is quite tricky, such is the static generated. Warners used the same budget sleeves for the vinyl in their Rumours Super Deluxe Edition back in January. They create these lovely deluxe products and then try and save a few pennies on something like this. I think it’s fair to say that the target audience for this 1969-1972 set are going to be vinyl enthusiasts who take the storage of their LPs seriously. Next time, we hope that extra is spent on decent anti-static sleeves that the vinyl records can glide into smoothly. After all, no one buys a Ferrari and opts for steel, rather than alloy wheels.

That quibble aside, this Fleetwood Mac 1969-1972 comes highly recommended. Enjoy our extensive photo gallery below.
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  #20  
Old 11-24-2013, 05:21 AM
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Telegraph Herald, November 22, 2013

http://www.bloomberglaw.com/exp/ewog...YiOiAiMSIKfQo=

Fleetwood Mac, "Fleetwood Mac: 1969 to 1972" (Reprise)

The first thing that comes to mind when mentioning Fleetwood Mac is their seminal album "Rumours." But the band's pre-"Rumours" days are rich with bluesy offerings that are well worth revisiting on the new box set "Fleetwood Mac: 1969 to 1972."

The highlight of the four-album, vinyl collection is the first re- mastered edition of "Then Play On," Fleetwood Mac's 1969 debut album on Reprise Records. This is a raw, young blues-fueled Fleetwood Mac and the sense of urgency to their music is on full display.

The opening, bongo-backed track "Coming Your Way" bristles with pace and the all-out house rocker "Fighting For Madge" showcases guitarist Peter Green as a force to rival Eric Clapton of that era.

"Future Games" is another winning platter, though it presents a softer Fleetwood Mac. By 1971 we find them putting together the less edgy sound that would prove to be the backbone to their radio mainstay hits to come. "Fleetwood Mac: 1969 to 1972" aptly presents the formative years of one of the most successful bands in history.
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  #21  
Old 12-14-2013, 04:32 AM
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Holland Sentinel, November 30, 2013

http://www.hollandsentinel.com/artic...plate=printart

Fleetwood Mac, "Fleetwood Mac: 1969 to 1972" (Reprise)
$69.99

The first thing that comes to mind when mentioning Fleetwood Mac is their seminal album "Rumours." But the band's pre-"Rumours" days are rich with bluesy offerings that are well worth revisiting on the new box set "Fleetwood Mac: 1969 to 1972."
The highlight of the four-album, vinyl collection is the first re-mastered edition of "Then Play On," Fleetwood Mac's 1969 debut album on Reprise Records. This is a raw, young blues-fueled Fleetwood Mac and the sense of urgency to their music is on full display. The opening, bongo-backed track "Coming Your Way" bristles with pace and the all-out house rocker "Fighting For Madge" showcases guitarist Peter Green as a force to rival Eric Clapton of that era.

"Future Games" is another winning platter, though it presents a softer Fleetwood Mac. By 1971 we find them putting together the less edgy sound that would prove to be the backbone to their radio mainstay hits to come. "Fleetwood Mac: 1969 to 1972" aptly presents the formative years of one of the most successful bands in history.

— Ron Harris, Associated Press writer
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  #22  
Old 03-24-2014, 12:25 PM
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Goldmine By Dave Thompson

Behold the bounty of early Fleetwood Mac in a vinyl box set

Posted in Articles, Collector Resources, Features, Spin Cycle March 24, 2014 |
Goldmine staff - See more at:


http://www.goldminemag.com/article/b....QtmyB7kh.dpuf


There are probably a few of you who will disagree with this, but it does seem that everybody with an ear for post-1960s rock has a favorite era of Fleetwood Mac. For some, of course, it’s the classic blues-breaking albums that introduced the band to the world in the first place. For others, it’s the unicorns and weirdness of the late 1970s; for others still, it’s the slew of sleek beasties that stirred in the aftermath of “Tusk.”But for anyone who lived within reach of a decent-sized venue through the first half of the ’70s, and who sallied forth as often as possible to catch the likes of Foghat and Humble Pie, it’s the post-Green, pre-Buckingham; post-hits, pre-superstardom; here we go round the circuit again and here’s a new album that no one will buy version of the band that appeals; and learned scholars still come to blows as they debate which of those albums is truly the greatest. “Kiln House” or “Future Games?” “Bare Trees” or “Mystery To Me?” “Penguin” or “Heroes Are Hard To Find?”

Well, prepare for at least half that argument to be resolved, as Rhino unleash a slick black limousine’s worth of classic 1970s Mac, the first four albums that they cut for the Reprise label between Green’s 1969 swan song, “Then Play On,” and Danny Kirwan’s 1972 farewell, “Bare Trees.” Whether the next three will follow in a matching package has yet to be revealed. But there’s enough here to at least remind us just what a solid, hardworking and generally excellent band Mac remained, regardless how many lineup changes the band went through.There’s little new to be said in praise of the first album in the sequence. Baroque, ballsy and occasionally plain barmy, “Then Play On” is a devastating statement of musical adventure, rarely sitting in the same place for long, and prone to some quite breathtaking diversions as it wanders along. A taste of this, of course, was given by the single “Oh Well,” a two-part slice of self-deprecation that was not originally intended for the album, but which Reprise added on once it became a hit.The pressing here retains the original track lineup, before “When You Say” and “My Dream” were sacrificed for the single; “Oh Well” is then appended as a bonus 45, tucked inside the gatefold sleeve. If we wanted to be greedy, we could wish they’d done the same for “The Green Manalishi,” Green’s other great single statement of the age. Instead, you’ll need to seek out the CD version for that (it and its B-side join “Oh Well” among the bonus tracks). But be warned: If you’re listening on headphones, be prepared to freak out. -

If “Then Play On” was Green’s album, “Kiln House” is the outgoing Jeremy Spencer’s, dominating the record with his fascination for ’50s-style pastiche, and hitting a climax of sorts with “Buddy’s Song,” which manages to squeeze several albums’ worth of old Buddy Holly song titles into a tribute to “Peggy Sue Got Married.”

It’s a thoroughly enjoyable album, even if it does lean a little too far toward novelty territory. At the same time, however, remember that the very early ’70s saw a lot of people looking back at the music of their own childhoods, from Dave Edmunds to Sha Na Na. “Kiln House” not only slides effortlessly into that company, it also slightly predates it. Its finest cut, Danny Kirwan’s “Station Man,” was still lingering in Mac’s live set through the early months of the Buckingham-Nicks lineup.

“Future Games” introduced Bob Welch, and, after years on the fringes, Christine McVie to the brew. For the first time, the vaguest suggestions of where Mac would wind up later in the decade come to light. At the same time, it’s probably the least memorable of all the band’s albums to date, with only the title track stepping into the realms of “classic” — and that probably has more to do with Welch’s subsequent rerecording of it.

Indeed, if any single incident damns this album, it’s the fact that the band delivered it up to the label at just seven songs long. It was still almost 40 minutes in length, which was fairly par for the course at that time, but Reprise’s marketing department wasn’t impressed. Seven songs was not good value. So Mac recorded an eighth, a two-minute jam that may (or may not) have been facetiously titled “What A Shame.” “Future Games” slunk out in fall 1971, and it was promptly forgotten.

“Bare Trees” completes the box, and it does so in style. Bob Welch’s “Sentimental Lady” was a priceless jewel; “Spare Me A Little Of Your Love” was another song that remained in the band’s live set years later (and also won a great Johnny Rivers cover); and the title track is simply magical. Plus, “Bare Trees” wraps with one of the most unexpected tracks in the band’s entire catalog, a recording of an old English lady, Mrs. Scarrott, reciting one of her own poems, “Thoughts on a Grey Day.”

OK, so that’s the contents. How’s the presentation? Well, it’s original artwork for everything, and that includes the initial pale yellow cover for “Future Games,” as opposed to the greenish one that is perhaps more familiar. The gatefolds are sturdy, the printing is pristine, and the box itself is stylish enough that you probably won’t be tempted to simply file the albums without it.

The sound quality, too, is excellent. Several people have said they were disappointed by Mac’s last vinyl outing, the re-pressed “Rumours” that was delivered in that album’s box. The remastering — digital, of course — had stripped a lot of the warmth from the music. Here, it is less pronounced … a lot less. If you know and love the original pressings, you already realize that you will never be satisfied with anything else. But in terms of just putting on a record and enjoying it, nothing here leaps out as an egregious deviation. In fact, for me, the greatest shock was hearing “Kiln House” without that ancient scratch that defiles Side Two of my own copy.

So buy with confidence, listen with glee and if you happen to be one of those people whose love of Mac stems from one of the band’s other eras, give it a go regardless. GM

- See more at: http://www.goldminemag.com/article/b....QtmyB7kh.dpuf


Last edited by michelej1 : 03-24-2014 at 12:28 PM.
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  #23  
Old 03-25-2014, 04:00 PM
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Quote:
it’s the unicorns and weirdness of the late 1970s
Well, I seem to have missed these unicorns! Maybe they were all hiding behind that Welsh witch?

Excellent review overall though, thanks for sharing it here!
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  #24  
Old 03-25-2014, 11:55 PM
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Default Vinyl remastering

Isn't it interesting that I just got a bill from Warner's Music Group for the remastering of Bob's songs without a check? Bob nor I never gave permission for them to remaster it and they have no right to charge me without my consent according to my contract. As Peter Green said "Oh, Well", my next battle to have to attack.
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  #25  
Old 03-26-2014, 01:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendy Welch View Post
I just got a bill from Warner's Music Group for the remastering of Bob's songs
That sounds totally bizarre, I've never heard of that except at the studio level or very small labels where it's almost a vanity release.

I do know of an artist who in his aging years, and with a very ill wife, was horribly mistreated (and illegally so) by a major NY/Hollywood company. He had fought in WWII but he simply had to give up and sign away rights just to get back physical property he owned to sell in essentially a blackmail situation. His wife needed expensive medical treatment. He went through the press at one point and got a lot of people to his side but the bad guys won and lots of people make more money in a week than he made in a year from his old original work. It's sort of the corporate regurgitation factory model versus simply treating individual creative people like your Bob as the keystones and valuable artists they are. Literally they can kill people. They killed me... I don't want to create anymore except on a level that doesn't involve big companies and hype. I had some health stuff appear, lost my fiancee, got knocked about by governments in two countries... lacking a multi-millionaire backing me I had to move on or die fighting. Kind of the opposite of the land of opportunity and meritocracy the U.S. bills itself as (and it was U.S. companies and U.S. contracts I've worked with). I have a theory sports is so appealing to people as it provides that mythical meritocracy in part (in part because many pro athletes have had to come from privileged backgrounds to devote themselves to some sports). I'm blathering, sorry.

It sounds like maybe ASCAP is holding royalties in escrow or something because of a dispute. As soon as something is settled they have to release whatever is there. People usually have to lose a piece for that though, such as in Badfinger's case where heirs had to suddenly share songwriting with people they didn't know of having contributed to songs but whereas the songwriter was gone people began claiming they'd had input. And band members were fairly aware at the time of what was happening to them. Like the artist I mentioned... it's like they hate the people with any awareness of the law and their rights most of all, those who haven't singed anything away. Man, it's the most depressing thing and they get away with it. The NY agent with big mansions and the creative person owning on a second hand car about to lose their house.

I'm sorry I can't really help other than sympathize. I admire and respect the fight in you and hope for at least some small victories.
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  #26  
Old 03-29-2014, 11:41 PM
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They cannot do this to me with no contract form Bob or I. Also, there is a precedent set, where we denied them the right before to charge us for remastering with no deal.
Also, you should know that there is a class action suit against Warners for not paying for downloads correctly for a lot of its artists. I have two forms to fill out regarding that. But it's not enough payment from them for this error.
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  #27  
Old 04-08-2015, 06:54 PM
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http://popdust.com/2015/04/03/fleetw...veaway/#slide1

When you think rock ‘n roll, Fleetwood Mac is certainly at the top of the list. They are the epitome of American culture, buoyed by such classics as Go Your Own Way, Songbird, Dreams, Rhiannon, Don’t Stop and countless other outstanding historical contributions. They’ve sold millions upon millions of albums, gone through numerous band member changes and inspired every single musician and singer-songwriter that has dared the music business ever since. Their legacy is unmatched, and now, fans can get a piece of history with this exclusive vinyl reissue and deluxe boxed set.

The band’s Then Play On (1969), their debut LP on Reprise, gets a revamped edition—which includes the original U.K. order and track segues, One Sunny Day and Without You (both make first appearances on an album issue), and brand-new liner notes penned by esteemed rock journalist David Fricke. Fans will also be happy to know there are four bonus tracks, including Oh Well – Pt. 1. This expanded edition is available for $18.98.

For the boxed set, four of the band’s classic albums (Then Play On, Kiln House, Future Games, Bare Trees) have been reproduced on 140-gram vinyl, with a bonus exclusive replica of the original 1969 7-inch single of Oh Well – Pt. 1 and Oh Well – Pt. 2. This package is also available for purchase for $79.98.

For a chance to win this vinyl reissue and boxed set (photos and track list details below), let us know how Fleetwood Mac has inspired YOU in the comments below! Popdust is truly honored to host this giveaway and will select one winner on Friday, April 10 at 2 p.m. EST.
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