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  #1  
Old 06-16-2019, 07:57 PM
Murrow Murrow is offline
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Default London - promises, promises...

I wasn't at the London show but I heard something about how the band had some older numbers planned for London that hadn't been done on the rest of the tour.

Looked down tonight's list on setlist.fm - same old same old. They better come up with something at the next one...
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Reuniting the Rumours line-up just produced 20 years of virtual silence. If Stevie didn't like the heat she should have quit the kitchen.

I know many will disagree - I have no desire to quarrel.

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  #2  
Old 06-16-2019, 08:15 PM
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https://metro.co.uk/2019/06/17/fleet...sound-9973482/



Fleetwood Mac fans leave Wembley Stadium concert early after complaining about ‘horrendous’ sound

Becky Freeth, Monday 17 Jun 2019 12:20 am

Some Fleetwood Mac ticketholders were asking for a refund after the first of the legendary band’s two London shows on Sunday night. In certain parts of the Wembley Stadium venue, fans praised the ‘amazing’ and ‘unbelievable’ show, while for others, the sound was described as ‘unbearable’.

It prompted ‘hundreds’ of the 90,000-strong crowd, who paid up to £150 for tickets, to leave the venue early, saying it had ruined their night.

‘Sound is horrendous – Wembley staff can’t do anything about it,’ one fan wrote on Twitter.

‘Can’t hear anything but echo – £150 a ticket – annoyed doesn’t cover it and they’ve moved as few people as they can. Shocker.’

Yet, many fans found quite the opposite, one with replying: ‘Ours was brilliant I was up front – I guess the engineer didn’t walk to the back – as I front of the desks it sounded amazing!’

Some ticketholders said they were ‘unable to hear a single word’ complaining that the audio was ‘muffled’ in some areas of the venue.

Others found it so ‘unbearable’ they said they walked out and footage from inside the venue shows many seatholders heading for the exits.

One fan said: ‘We left, the sound was honestly unbearable. Really feel for everyone there tonight, especially Fleetwood Mac. How can I claim a refund?’

Another suggested: ‘Please turn off the repeaters, they are ruining the sound. @Fleetwoodmac’.

Defending the band, others argued that video of fans leaving their seats actually showed fans grabbing refreshments during the notoriously long World Turning instrumental.

Representatives for Live Nation and Wembley Stadium have been approached for comment.

Despite the technical issues in some parts of Wembley Stadium, for some Fleetwood Mac fans, the show was described as ‘amazing’ and ‘brilliant’

It’s the first of two shows this week that forms part of the legendary band’s 28-date around the world tour.
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"I think what you would say is that there were factions within the band that had lost their perspective. What that did was to harm the 43-year legacy that we had worked so hard to build, and that legacy was really about rising above difficulties in order to fulfill one's higher truth and one's higher destiny."
Lindsey Buckingham, May 11, 2018.
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  #3  
Old 06-17-2019, 04:39 AM
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Stadium sound sucks even in the best of conditions. All rock concerts should be confined to an arena.
90,000 people? Is that a record for a Mac concert? That's insane.
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  #4  
Old 06-17-2019, 08:08 AM
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Sound was ok the day before at the Spice Girls concert and The Pretenders before FM was also ok. People at the stadium are blaming FM sound people, as it should be. And fans are asking for refunds.
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"I think what you would say is that there were factions within the band that had lost their perspective. What that did was to harm the 43-year legacy that we had worked so hard to build, and that legacy was really about rising above difficulties in order to fulfill one's higher truth and one's higher destiny."
Lindsey Buckingham, May 11, 2018.
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  #5  
Old 06-17-2019, 01:39 PM
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https://www.ft.com/content/1bf28374-...1-2b1d33ac3271



Fleetwood Mac at Wembley Stadium — has the chain been broken?


After 52 years the band can still sell out Wembley Stadium but the latest line-up change may be a rupture too far


Ludovic Hunter-Tilney

A tour by one of the biggest bands in rock history is always notable, but “An Evening with Fleetwood Mac” might have been particularly special. When it was conceived, there were suggestions that it could have been Fleetwood Mac’s swansong. A new album was in the offing too, a final recording. But the band’s penchant for volatility has once again intervened.

It is the second tour since Christine McVie officially rejoined their ranks in 2014. The keyboardist-singer played a key role writing some of their biggest hits, and the new Fleetwood Mac album was to have been written by her and guitarist-singer Lindsey Buckingham. But singer Stevie Nicks did not want to record a new Mac album, so instead it appeared under McVie’s and Buckingham’s joint name in 2017.


The next twist came with Buckingham’s exit from the group, reportedly after reigniting his long-running feud with his ex-lover Nicks. He stomped off to play solo shows in the US last year, where his setlist included a pointed rendition of the Fleetwood Mac song “Never Going Back Again”. Meanwhile, his septuagenarian former bandmates are touring the world with a nostalgia-circuit setlist and no talk of farewells.

Two Wembley Stadium shows mark the end of the European leg, with Australia next up. The first night opened with the Mac and their touring musicians walking on stage without razzmatazz, the very image of a working band. The sound was a steady-as-she-goes drumbeat, played by Mick Fleetwood, the bearded, ponytailed, affably piratical mainstay who has been in every line-up of the band over the course of its convoluted 52-year history




By his side in white flat cap was bassist John McVie, the “Mac” of the band’s name. He stood rooted to the spot, thrumming out a muscular passage of notes during opening track “The Chain”, but otherwise content to play a background role. However, he seemed to sway forwards, almost uprooting himself, during Nicks’ turn in “Black Magic Woman”, as though magnetised by her inimitable stadium-rock version of the feminine divine. She stood out front, flanked by Christine McVie, John’s ex-wife, who played keyboards. Across the stage from them were Buckingham’s dual replacements: lead guitarist Mike Campbell, formerly of Tom Petty’s backing band, and vocalist and rhythm guitarist Neil Finn of Crowded House.


There were complaints about the sound quality, although it was fine from where I was sitting. High ticket prices had not translated into a large-scale production: the staging was basic, even routine. Fleetwood’s old-school 10-minute drum solo with second percussionist Taku Hirano was the most elaborate moment.




Christine McVie sang her vocal parts with appealing clarity, although she was the least forceful of the various vocalists. Nicks was in great voice, warm and amber in tone, smoothly going through the gears as songs such as “Rhiannon” grew in volume. She kept her whirligig dancing to a minimum, only going full West Coast shaman during “Gold Dust Woman”. Perhaps the absence of her frenemy Buckingham had an oddly inhibiting effect.

Campbell did the missing Mac man’s guitar solos efficiently, while Finn sang gamely and leapt about in willing approximation of Buckingham’s outré stage energy. But it lacked a spark. In their heyday, Fleetwood Mac, the band of cocaine and divorce, had a gift for turning complicated emotional scenarios into persuasive and exhilarating soft-rock. But the sight of Buckingham’s stand-in singing “Someone has taken my place” in “Second Hand News”, a track written by Buckingham about an ambivalent relationship at a time when he was in one with Nicks, was a rupture too far.


★★☆☆☆
__________________
"I think what you would say is that there were factions within the band that had lost their perspective. What that did was to harm the 43-year legacy that we had worked so hard to build, and that legacy was really about rising above difficulties in order to fulfill one's higher truth and one's higher destiny."
Lindsey Buckingham, May 11, 2018.
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  #6  
Old 06-17-2019, 01:42 PM
FuzzyPlum FuzzyPlum is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Macfan4life View Post
Stadium sound sucks even in the best of conditions. All rock concerts should be confined to an arena.
90,000 people? Is that a record for a Mac concert? That's insane.
I think it was discussed on her that 90000+ people saw them at the old Wembley Stadium for the Behind the Mask tour in 1990. It might have held more people back then as I'm sure the floor would have been general admission but now its all seated.


This chap's not very happy;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivLJhSYPcUg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=glnPNQ7NQVE
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  #7  
Old 06-17-2019, 02:11 PM
FuzzyPlum FuzzyPlum is offline
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Financial Times

Fleetwood Mac at Wembley Stadium — has the chain been broken?

https://www.ft.com/content/1bf28374-...1-2b1d33ac3271

After 52 years the band can still sell out Wembley Stadium but the latest line-up change may be a rupture too far



A tour by one of the biggest bands in rock history is always notable, but “An Evening with Fleetwood Mac” might have been particularly special. When it was conceived, there were suggestions that it could have been Fleetwood Mac’s swansong. A new album was in the offing too, a final recording. But the band’s penchant for volatility has once again intervened.

It is the second tour since Christine McVie officially rejoined their ranks in 2014. The keyboardist-singer played a key role writing some of their biggest hits, and the new Fleetwood Mac album was to have been written by her and guitarist-singer Lindsey Buckingham. But singer Stevie Nicks did not want to record a new Mac album, so instead it appeared under McVie’s and Buckingham’s joint name in 2017.

The next twist came with Buckingham’s exit from the group, reportedly after reigniting his long-running feud with his ex-lover Nicks. He stomped off to play solo shows in the US last year, where his setlist included a pointed rendition of the Fleetwood Mac song “Never Going Back Again”. Meanwhile, his septuagenarian former bandmates are touring the world with a nostalgia-circuit setlist and no talk of farewells.

Two Wembley Stadium shows mark the end of the European leg, with Australia next up. The first night opened with the Mac and their touring musicians walking on stage without razzmatazz, the very image of a working band. The sound was a steady-as-she-goes drumbeat, played by Mick Fleetwood, the bearded, ponytailed, affably piratical mainstay who has been in every line-up of the band over the course of its convoluted 52-year history.

By his side in white flat cap was bassist John McVie, the “Mac” of the band’s name. He stood rooted to the spot, thrumming out a muscular passage of notes during opening track “The Chain”, but otherwise content to play a background role. However, he seemed to sway forwards, almost uprooting himself, during Nicks’ turn in “Black Magic Woman”, as though magnetised by her inimitable stadium-rock version of the feminine divine. She stood out front, flanked by Christine McVie, John’s ex-wife, who played keyboards. Across the stage from them were Buckingham’s dual replacements: lead guitarist Mike Campbell, formerly of Tom Petty’s backing band, and vocalist and rhythm guitarist Neil Finn of Crowded House.

There were complaints about the sound quality, although it was fine from where I was sitting. High ticket prices had not translated into a large-scale production: the staging was basic, even routine. Fleetwood’s old-school 10-minute drum solo with second percussionist Taku Hirano was the most elaborate moment.

Christine McVie sang her vocal parts with appealing clarity, although she was the least forceful of the various vocalists. Nicks was in great voice, warm and amber in tone, smoothly going through the gears as songs such as “Rhiannon” grew in volume. She kept her whirligig dancing to a minimum, only going full West Coast shaman during “Gold Dust Woman”. Perhaps the absence of her frenemy Buckingham had an oddly inhibiting effect.

Campbell did the missing Mac man’s guitar solos efficiently, while Finn sang gamely and leapt about in willing approximation of Buckingham’s outré stage energy. But it lacked a spark. In their heyday, Fleetwood Mac, the band of cocaine and divorce, had a gift for turning complicated emotional scenarios into persuasive and exhilarating soft-rock. But the sight of Buckingham’s stand-in singing “Someone has taken my place” in “Second Hand News”, a track written by Buckingham about an ambivalent relationship at a time when he was in one with Nicks, was a rupture too far.

★★☆☆☆
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  #8  
Old 06-17-2019, 10:33 PM
onlynow onlynow is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Murrow View Post
I wasn't at the London show but I heard something about how the band had some older numbers planned for London that hadn't been done on the rest of the tour.

Looked down tonight's list on setlist.fm - same old same old. They better come up with something at the next one...
Where did u hear they might add different songs, and did they give specifics?
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  #9  
Old 06-18-2019, 03:12 AM
guillamene guillamene is offline
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There won't be any surprises in the set!
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  #10  
Old 06-18-2019, 04:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FuzzyPlum View Post
I think it was discussed on her that 90000+ people saw them at the old Wembley Stadium for the Behind the Mask tour in 1990. It might have held more people back then as I'm sure the floor would have been general admission but now its all seated.


This chap's not very happy;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivLJhSYPcUg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=glnPNQ7NQVE
Wow that is still an impressive gig.
The Mac is not a flashy band with stage technology. I understand some flaming them for not adding some flash to such a huge stadium gig.
90,000 are Rolling Stones kind of numbers
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  #11  
Old 06-18-2019, 12:43 PM
FuzzyPlum FuzzyPlum is offline
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Originally Posted by Macfan4life View Post
Wow that is still an impressive gig.
The Mac is not a flashy band with stage technology. I understand some flaming them for not adding some flash to such a huge stadium gig.
90,000 are Rolling Stones kind of numbers

The only time I can say I was blown away by a stadium gig was Rolling Stones at Wembley on the Voodoo Lounge tour in the mid 90's. That was a real experience.
Difficult to comment on the recent Mac gig but it looks like a pretty poor atmosphere to me. Aside from the Tom Petty tribute are there any rear screens to add some extra aesthetic interest (other than band close-ups)?
That said, comments from attendees generally seem to be favourable aside from those with the sound issues.
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  #12  
Old 06-18-2019, 02:55 PM
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Review from The Times

So many things to highlight here!

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/r...dium-zj2zl30xl


Review: Fleetwood Mac at Wembley Stadium

With no Lindsey Buckingham, what should have been a celebration of a huge band’s enduring power felt like an empty spectacle.

The sound was muddy, Stevie Nicks’s vocals veered towards flatness and the band stomped when they should have swung
MARILYN KINGWILL

★★☆☆☆


And so the soap opera continues. The story of Fleetwood Mac’s 1977 album Rumours is enshrined in soft-rock history: new recruits Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham inject California pizzazz into moribund British blues rockers, their relationship crumbles and the result is the divorce classic of the 1970s, with Buckingham lacerating his former lover on Second Hand News and Go Your Own Way and Nicks offering the gentler Dreams.

Forty million album sales certainly helped the band members to see past their emotional entanglements and keep the show on the road, but it all got too much last year when, according to their manager, Irving Azoff, Buckingham failed to suppress a smirk during a speech by Nicks at an awards ceremony. That was the last straw. After 43 years he got the boot. Now the band were carrying on regardless, with Neil Finn of Crowded House and Mike Campbell of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers hired to fill Buckingham’s shoes, and what should have been a celebration of a huge band’s enduring power felt like an empty spectacle.

Unsurprisingly at this Wembley gig there was no Tusk, Buckingham’s experimental masterwork from 1979, and no Never Going Back Again, his folky acoustic moment from Rumours, but also no mention of him at all.Had there been a Rumours-era photograph of Fleetwood Mac shown on the screen with Buckingham cut out and Finn stuck in his place, it wouldn’t have been surprising. Yet the inescapable fact is there was chemistry between Buckingham and Nicks, even if they disliked each other, and no amount of gushing about how wonderful this new line-up was could replace that.


On top of that the sound at Wembley was muddy, Nicks’s vocals veered towards flatness, the band stomped when they should have swung and there were some highly questionable musical interludes. A ten-minute drum solo from Mick Fleetwood is one thing. A drum solo with vocal commentary (“Nice and slow! Don’t be shy!”) proved close to unbearable. The sight of Finn spinning about with his guitar was not a welcome one, and did a Fleetwood Mac crowd really need a rendition of Don’t Dream It’s Over by Crowded House? “This is a song of unity,” Finn claimed, apparently without irony.

At least we could sing along to the old favourites. The Chain remains one of the greatest songs about troubled affairs and Don’t Stop, the keyboardist/songwriter Christine McVie’s message to her bassist husband John McVie as they split up, never fails to lift the spirits.

There were creative moments too. Nicks, a hippy vision in black gown and gold shawl, offered interpretive dancing and some expert moaning for her cocaine lament Gold Dust Woman. And Oh Well, a stop-start blues-buster from Fleetwood Mac’s late-1960s, Peter Green-led era, brought searing guitar from Campbell. In the main, though, dealing with the loss of Buckingham by simply pretending he never existed made this plodding show feel like a glum reminder of departed joys.
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"I think what you would say is that there were factions within the band that had lost their perspective. What that did was to harm the 43-year legacy that we had worked so hard to build, and that legacy was really about rising above difficulties in order to fulfill one's higher truth and one's higher destiny."
Lindsey Buckingham, May 11, 2018.
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  #13  
Old 06-18-2019, 03:00 PM
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The last line sums it up "Pretending he never existed"

Touring for the money. Not the creativity. Not for the promotion of new or deeper tracks.
Play Don't Stop and Dreams and you can still fill a stadium apparently
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  #14  
Old 06-18-2019, 06:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Macfan4life View Post
The last line sums it up "Pretending he never existed"
I'm curious what people actually want to happen when they say this. I mean, I know they want him to have not been fired in the first place, but that's a done deal. To really pretend he never existed, you would have to cut his songs out of the set, but his contributions to the band's legacy are still represented by GYOW, SHN, etc. You can't fire someone and then spend every night talking about him. Once you've made the decision that you can't continue with someone, what more is there to do?
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Old 06-18-2019, 06:42 PM
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I'm curious what people actually want to happen when they say this. I mean, I know they want him to have not been fired in the first place, but that's a done deal. To really pretend he never existed, you would have to cut his songs out of the set, but his contributions to the band's legacy are still represented by GYOW, SHN, etc. You can't fire someone and then spend every night talking about him. Once you've made the decision that you can't continue with someone, what more is there to do?
They never admitted he was fired. And they never will.

They spend every night talking and showing pics of someone that was never part of the band.
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"I think what you would say is that there were factions within the band that had lost their perspective. What that did was to harm the 43-year legacy that we had worked so hard to build, and that legacy was really about rising above difficulties in order to fulfill one's higher truth and one's higher destiny."
Lindsey Buckingham, May 11, 2018.
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