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  #1  
Old 04-07-2021, 11:25 AM
jbrownsjr jbrownsjr is offline
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Default Live Deluxe Articles

https://www.popmatters.com/fleetwood...mLJCnHBmaiktdU
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Old 04-07-2021, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by jbrownsjr View Post
Wow this one must have been written by a generation z . Fleetwood Mac live was not a big seller on release in fact it was somewhat of a flop. Say You Love Me is a "deep cut" from the White AlbumIt was the radio smash that finally propelled the album to number one.
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Old 04-07-2021, 08:11 PM
jbrownsjr jbrownsjr is offline
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Wow this one must have been written by a generation z . Fleetwood Mac live was not a big seller on release in fact it was somewhat of a flop. Say You Love Me is a "deep cut" from the White AlbumIt was the radio smash that finally propelled the album to number one.
It was like pulling teeth getting through this article.
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Old 04-08-2021, 08:28 PM
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From MusicOMH:

Fleetwood Mac – Live (Super Deluxe Edition)
(Rhino) UK release date: 9 April 2021
Majoring on tracks from Tusk and Rumours, this 1980 release is a living, breathing document of one of the most spectacular implosions of an artistic collective ever witnessed

Fleetwood Mac - Live
Fleetwood Mac – Live
Despite their undisputed status as one of the best bands of all time, there are more albums in the Fleetwood Mac canon that are relatively unknown by modern listeners. From their earliest incarnation as a blues band under the stewardship of Peter Green, to their unheralded but actually rather brilliant phase as a first-wave soft rock band under Danny Kirwan’s leadership, to their world-smashing halcyon days in the mid-to-late ’70s, the band underwent many radical stylistic shifts that tended to coincide with changes in personnel. Albums like Bare Trees, Penguin and Kiln House have been lost along the way, but no album has a more precarious position in their discography than 1980’s Live set.

Released during the most interesting period in the band’s entire history, Live is an intimate look at the band’s complete disintegration in the years surrounding Rumours, which also led to the production of one of the most bizarre, most loveable oddball curate’s eggs ever committed to tape: Tusk. The core lineup (the most famous lineup) of Mick Fleetwood, John McVie, Christine McVie, Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham had splintered by the time Tusk was recorded, and the album is an inadvertent showcase for one of the strangest yet most thrilling groups ever to find their way into a studio.

This drug-addled, violent and explosive Tusk-era Fleetwood Mac is what we hear on the bulk of this newly-expanded 1980 Live album (all two-plus hours of it) but there are also cuts dating back to 1975 and 1977, a couple of demos and a remix. So to say that this new version of Live is a warts-and-all set is to do it both a disservice and a favour. The original album featured almost an hour and a half of music culled from performances from around the globe, hastily stitched together and thrown out into the world to try and recoup some of the mountains of cash spent on both the tour and the Tusk album (one of the most expensive albums ever made, despite only a fraction of it being spent on recording sessions).

Needless to say, this expanded release is an essential document for many of Fleetwood Mac’s fans, but it also offers endless riches for those who’ve only a basic knowledge of the Mac’s hits (they’re all here, of course). From the powerful, glass-smooth version of Dreams (culled from a Rumours soundcheck), to the frazzled, pinpoint-pupil freakout of Go Your Own Way (from 1980), the band showcase their beautiful side as readily as they do their ugly, messy unpredictability. On the former, Stevie Nicks is controlled yet vibrant, rehearsed but not dialled-in, while on the latter, Lindsey Buckingham sounds like he’s one pill away from a breakdown.

By the time Buckingham assumed total control of the band in 1978, he was clearly suffering from a crisis of confidence, but buoyed by an immense ego and fuelled by a maniacal creative drive. The fact that he feels the need to introduce Nicks’ masterpiece Sara should tell you everything you need to know – this is his show, and this is his band. He’s right, of course, all the way up to the inclusion of the Beach Boys’ curio Farmer’s Daughter (which closed the original Live), which he felt showcased his connection to Brian Wilson’s demented genius. Legend has it that Buckingham gained access to the original tapes of the then-lost Smile album during the sessions for Tusk, which led to him making drastic production decisions during the record’s recording (tissue box percussion, for instance). But of course, the connection is most clear when he doesn’t mean it to be: just as Wilson’s fractured melodic purity is as evident on his deepest cuts as it is on his most well-known, Buckingham’s power is just as clear on the punk-fuelled Not That Funny as it is on the vitriolic classic rock of What Makes You Think You’re The One (presented here in as a snotty New Wave stomper).

If you already own the original Live, or the remastered CD, there’s still plenty of reason to buy this new edition (if you had the £70 to pay for it). Spirited versions of Green Manalishi and Gold Dust Woman (from 1977) sit next to raucous, sloppy versions of The Chain (missing from the original album), Tusk and Angel (all from 1980). Hell, this version of The Chain might be the ugliest version ever released – all of the vocalists sound demented, all of the instruments fighting for dominance, leading to a thrilling, disorientating crescendo.

Minor gripes aside (why wasn’t a whole 1980 set included as a separate disc?), this is a fantastic collection of songs, played with vigour and fire and commitment – and even rage. It’s a living, breathing document of one of the most spectacular implosions of an artistic collective ever witnessed, and stands as testament to Fleetwood Mac’s neverending intrigue. When Mirage followed in 1982, the band had regained its composure, but lost much of its saturnine magic, Buckingham having been emasculated by the extent of Nicks’ solo success. Live is, for better and worse, a document of the storm before the calm – and a wonderful couple of hours of hard rocking escapism from one of the world’s most treasured bands.
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Old 04-08-2021, 09:23 PM
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I like the review!

"Buckingham having been emasculated by the extent of Nicks’ solo success."

Indeed. And his man parts finally removed in 2018. Cut to 2021, with him wanting to return, after his genitals had long since been pureed in $tevie Nick's food processor.

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I wish they'd release this without the vinyl. $100 is TOO MUCH!
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Old 04-08-2021, 10:01 PM
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While I do not deny that Lindsey took control, I think it’s ridiculous to suggest that his very introduction of a Stevie or Christine song was a show of power. The band always did that and it is just so that the singer will have a proper third party intro. It’s a manner of presentation. You introduce the other party to direct the audience’s focus on them. The way they do it, it is actually a way to be polite, not to be domineering.

Now if you want to say that when Lindsey called a song “pretty” he was being condescending, go ahead and say that. But it’s ridiculous to assume that him merely introducing a song is flexing his muscles. It’s an example of stating a premise and then making everything else cram into that premise whether it fits or not.
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Old 04-08-2021, 10:12 PM
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Originally Posted by michelej1 View Post
While I do not deny that Lindsey took control, I think it’s ridiculous to suggest that his very introduction of a Stevie or Christine song was a show of power. The band always did that and it is just so that the singer will have a proper third party intro. It’s a manner of presentation.But it’s ridiculous to assume that him(Lindsey) merely introducing a song is flexing his muscles..
I agree with you. Don't ask me which show but one of my fave words ever after a song came from Christine. After Lindsey performed a fantastic song Chris tells the audience, "he thanks you." I loved that so much that I regularly use that phrase in my every day conversations, since I often refer to myself in the 3rd person anyways. LOL

Also in the review they claimed Lindsey was one pill away from a nervous breakdown and I disagree because I always felt he was in fine form in concert. More than anyone else on that stage, LB always gave 110%.
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Old 04-09-2021, 04:57 AM
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The MusicOMH review is very readable. The critic has all kinds of opinions (some on-spot, others bizarrely off-base) and these opinions are fun to read. Btw: I completely disagree regarding the 1982 version of The Chain being the ugly and demented version. It’s a dynamic, perfectly-executed performance.

Last edited by aleuzzi; 04-09-2021 at 03:19 PM..
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Old 04-09-2021, 09:53 AM
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I agree with you. Don't ask me which show but one of my fave words ever after a song came from Christine. After Lindsey performed a fantastic song Chris tells the audience, "he thanks you." I loved that so much that I regularly use that phrase in my every day conversations, since I often refer to myself in the 3rd person anyways. LOL

Also in the review they claimed Lindsey was one pill away from a nervous breakdown and I disagree because I always felt he was in fine form in concert. More than anyone else on that stage, LB always gave 110%.
You mean to tell me when Christine would say "Young Stevie" at the end of Stevie's song, it was not her way of sucking up to the lead singer in Fleetwood Mac?




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Old 04-09-2021, 11:10 AM
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  #10  
Old 04-09-2021, 11:18 AM
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Why didn’t they put the whole live show on the reissue of Mirage instead of just the 13 songs?
Probably because all the overdubs had already been done for those 13 songs, 39 years ago. Not saying they didn't overdub the other songs back then, but who knows? If they were to try to overdub now? Their voices now vs 39 years ago? Froggy went a courtin'.....

The audio on the live disc is EXACTLY the audio from the Mirage VHS tape concert.

Talk about lazy....they are.
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Old 04-09-2021, 11:52 AM
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I don't think Lindsey ever intended to be condescending or whatever you want to call it, when introducing Sara or any song. After all his very own work is all over those songs.

But there have always been a belief that Lindsey is/was always a jerk in every situation possible, at any given time and that view was only amplified and picked up by others in 2018.

And the line about being one pill away from a breakdown is laughable. Based on what? Sounds like the writer just needed some interesting statements to add to the mix.

Stating that Farmer's Daughter was somehow solely Lindsey's baby and neglecting to point out that Christine was dating one of the Beach Boys is a glaring example of the complete lack of homework done by the writer.

It's sort of an observation, but as more time goes by it seems like Stevie's drug fueled performances and vocal issues get a pass in write-ups like these. It's been talked to death in the past 20 years, now the focus has shifted to equate a frantic guitar solo with being one pill away from a breakdown.

People bash it, but I think Mick's assessment of the Tusk tour in his book seems like a much better, well balanced account of that time period. This article seems like a big mish-mash of partially incorrect information, speculation, and tales of rock folklore.

Mick said something like - "some shows were a master class in guitar while others were rooted in breathtaking performances from Stevie" etc.

When talking about the band during this period, I don't get the need to imply one person was taking ownership of the band etc. 2020 culture demands a black and white reasoning for everything and Fleetwood Mac in the 70s was definitely a myriad of shades of grey of contributing factors.
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Old 04-09-2021, 04:24 PM
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Its hard to get through an article when its starts out with a glaring inaccuracy. The Live album was a huge disappointment. The band was on a platinum roll and then the live album ruined the streak. You must rewind time and look at all the live albums in the 70s. Peter Frampton made a career and become mega rich over one live album. The Rolling Stones put out countless live albums and they were all successful. Bands made huge bucks on live albums in the 70s.
In 1980, the consensus was the album Tusk was a flop even though it went platinum. It sold only a fraction of its predecessor. Tusk was also a double album. Warner Brothers had a Tusk hangover and begged not to to the Live album.
Having said the facts, IMHO the Live album is one of the greatest albums in Mac history. We have all stated things we love about the album and I could write forever. I love so many performances were recorded when the Mac was a well oiled machine and an animal live.
From a marketing standpoint, Fleetwood Mac made one of the biggest errors in selling albums. Just imagine a live Fleetwood Mac double album released in 1978. OMG, it would have sold 10 million copies. But the band was looking forward and the long Tusk days probably did not want them chasing Rumours limelight. But talk about a missed opportunity for Warner Brothers and the band. Live albums had their peak in the late 70s and the Mac was all over the charts. Having said that, I am glad they waited because so many of the Tusk songs are so good on this album. I cant wait to get my hands on a copy of this reissue.
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Old 04-09-2021, 05:03 PM
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I don't think Lindsey ever intended to be condescending or whatever you want to call it, when introducing Sara or any song. After all his very own work is all over those songs.
te lack of homework done by the writer.
I don’t think he is shy about deprecating their songs, whether he worked to improve them or not. Some songs of theirs he probably just doesn’t like.

But I did used to laugh when he would say there would be 33% more testosterone when Chris left because he himself was often the “very pretty” part of that band.

I loved when Waddy said that he tried to fit into BN and maybe form a band with them, but they didn’t rock hard enough for him. He said that is why he referred Lindsey for the Everly Bros. job. Lindsey’s got that Everly thing going and he uses Phil’s wall of sound very prettily too. Hold Me is as much like he is as Gift of Screws (the song) is.

Last edited by michelej1; 04-09-2021 at 05:47 PM..
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Old 04-09-2021, 05:22 PM
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I loved when Waddy said that he tried to fit into BN and maybe form a band with them, but they didn’t rock hard enough for him. He said that is why he referred Lindsey for the Everly Bros. job. Lindsey’s got that Everly thing going and he uses Phil’s wall of sound very prettily too. Hold Me is as much like he is as Gift of Screws (the song) is.
Waddy was not a gifted singer. I don't think he could've sang the Everly songs well. But definitely very kind of him to refer Lindsey for the job because Lindsey wasn't well known like Waddy was.
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Old 04-09-2021, 05:46 PM
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Waddy was not a gifted singer. I don't think he could've sang the Everly songs well. But definitely very kind of him to refer Lindsey for the job because Lindsey wasn't well known like Waddy was.
Waddy would have played the guitar on the Everly gig. He referred Lindsey instead because he liked to rock more. Of course, he also said he made fun of Lindsey for being so dedicated to Stevie’s songs and look how Waddy ended up!
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