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  #1501  
Old 09-05-2017, 05:12 AM
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Today in rock history; Stones and Ministry release live records, Buckingham & Nicks' Fleetwood Mac goes no. 1, more

Today in rock history: on this date in 1976, the self-titled Fleetwood Mac album that boasted the band’s brand new lineup eased its way into the no. 1 spot on Billboard’s sales charts in the U.S. After a slow and steady climb towards the top spot after more than a year, the record — which was Mac’s first to feature brand new band members Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks — hit the coveted no. 1 spot and became the first of three consecutive chart-toppers this formation of the band would enjoy. The album features the massive Fleetwood Mac singles “Over My Head,” “Say You Love Me” and “Rhiannon.” and it ushered in a whole new era for the former blues band who would from this point going forward would become one of the best-selling and popular rock bands all around the world.


http://www.cltampa.com/music/music-n...-no-1-and-more
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  #1502  
Old 09-17-2017, 07:38 AM
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Carter Alan’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Diary: September 17 in Classic Rock History

1997: Fleetwood Mac began its reunion tour prompted by the success of its CD “The Dance” with a show in Hartford.

http://wzlx.cbslocal.com/2017/09/17/...ock-history-3/
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  #1503  
Old 09-17-2017, 04:59 PM
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Originally Posted by SisterNightroad View Post
Carter Alan’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Diary: September 17 in Classic Rock History

1997: Fleetwood Mac began its reunion tour prompted by the success of its CD “The Dance” with a show in Hartford.

http://wzlx.cbslocal.com/2017/09/17/...ock-history-3/
oh,, Carter Alan.... there's a blast from the past.... used to listen to him in my youth on WBCN.
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  #1504  
Old 09-23-2017, 12:11 PM
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Discover the harmonies and studio wizardry in our Sunday Telegraph Spotify Headphone Epics playlist
QUEEN, The Eagles, Daft Punk and Fleetwood Mac all have hits that sound better with headphones. Here are 10 of the best songs to listen to like a DJ.


AUDIOPHILES often have a go-to list of songs to test the quality of their speakers or headphones.
And while most experts suggest the best way to test the listening experience is by playing your favourite songs because of your familiarity with them, some artists pride themselves of their technical wizardry in the studio.
As recording technology came of age in the 1970s, many of that decade’s greatest records experimented in the studio with shifting between speakers, pumping up the bass and injecting other sonic tricks to thrill the listener.
This week’s Sunday Spotify playlist presents 10 HeadphoneEpics for music fans who want to explore all the nuances of a great studio recordings.

9. The Chain, Fleetwood Mac. One of the greatest pleasures of the headphone listen is hearing not only multi-layered voices and harmonies but the subtleties of the snare and a plucked guitar. This has got it all.


http://www.news.com.au/national/nsw-...3a567e374fd951
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  #1505  
Old 09-24-2017, 04:54 AM
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The 30 must-read music books of Fall 2017
From memoirs to rankings, here are the best titles on rock, rap and country hitting the market this season


"Goodnight L.A.: The Rise and Fall of Classic Rock — The Untold Story from inside the Legendary Recording Studios," by Kent Hartman
If recording studio walls could talk, they'd tell the best, juiciest stories. That's the premise of this book, which reveals tantalizing secrets behind blockbusters from Foreigner, Fleetwood Mac and Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers, to name a few. Buy it here.


http://www.salon.com/2017/09/23/music-books-fall-2017/
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  #1506  
Old 09-25-2017, 01:46 PM
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Letter: Music and songs with meaning

To the editor:

If you know me, my love of Fleetwood Mac has been more than established. I grew up with a mother who listened to a lot of music and some of those songs included hits such as, "Don't Stop," "Rhiannon," "Gypsy," "Little Lies," among others. A lot of what she loved and still loves, has rubbed off on me. Thanks, mom.

My family, peers and team members at work tease me over my great love of Fleetwood Mac. Of course, I do love the music, but more importantly, the words they sing mean something to me. There is not one song written by Stevie Nicks, Christine McVie, Lindsey Buckingham (and a few others) that wasn't written based on life experiences.

"Don't Stop" was written by Christine McVie for her then-husband John McVie, who suffered from alcoholism. Stevie wrote "Sara" in part over her aborted child." She also sings "Landslide" in a nod to her relationship with Buckingham. In turn, "Go Your Own Way" is his way of telling Nicks to get lost, after they broke up. One of the signature songs that they are all a part of is, "The Chain" — "I can still hear you saying, you would never break the chain."

While they loved and soared, all of them fell victim to cocaine and alcohol. Christine, Stevie, and Lindsey all left Fleetwood Mac at different times; McVie was gone for 16 years! But over time all five rejoined and they have weathered personal storms in their lives.

This 27-year-old was beyond blessed to see Stevie Nicks at the State Fair last week, and he'll be in the third row in October, in Minneapolis, to see Christine McVie and Lindsey Buckingham.

They represent traits all of us should strive for: love, resilience, friendship, and a sense of a bond that will never break.

Steve Hensley

Alexandria, MN


http://www.echopress.com/opinion/let...-songs-meaning
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  #1507  
Old 09-27-2017, 06:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SisterNightroad View Post
Letter: Music and songs with meaning

To the editor:

If you know me, my love of Fleetwood Mac has been more than established. I grew up with a mother who listened to a lot of music and some of those songs included hits such as, "Don't Stop," "Rhiannon," "Gypsy," "Little Lies," among others. A lot of what she loved and still loves, has rubbed off on me. Thanks, mom.

My family, peers and team members at work tease me over my great love of Fleetwood Mac. Of course, I do love the music, but more importantly, the words they sing mean something to me. There is not one song written by Stevie Nicks, Christine McVie, Lindsey Buckingham (and a few others) that wasn't written based on life experiences.

"Don't Stop" was written by Christine McVie for her then-husband John McVie, who suffered from alcoholism. Stevie wrote "Sara" in part over her aborted child." She also sings "Landslide" in a nod to her relationship with Buckingham. In turn, "Go Your Own Way" is his way of telling Nicks to get lost, after they broke up. One of the signature songs that they are all a part of is, "The Chain" — "I can still hear you saying, you would never break the chain."

While they loved and soared, all of them fell victim to cocaine and alcohol. Christine, Stevie, and Lindsey all left Fleetwood Mac at different times; McVie was gone for 16 years! But over time all five rejoined and they have weathered personal storms in their lives.

This 27-year-old was beyond blessed to see Stevie Nicks at the State Fair last week, and he'll be in the third row in October, in Minneapolis, to see Christine McVie and Lindsey Buckingham.

They represent traits all of us should strive for: love, resilience, friendship, and a sense of a bond that will never break.

Steve Hensley

Alexandria, MN


http://www.echopress.com/opinion/let...-songs-meaning
That last line is something I think all of us here on The Ledge should remember a bit more. Our love of FM has brought us all here...and we should cherish that instead of picking each other's preferences apart. Their music has and will continue to withstand the test of time. Not many bands can say that. I think we should just all be thankful for what they have given us as a whole. Myself included...
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  #1508  
Old 09-28-2017, 07:55 AM
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Pretty cover of Dreams right at the end of this video:

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  #1509  
Old 09-29-2017, 12:18 PM
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  #1510  
Old 10-04-2017, 06:06 AM
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Great British Bake Off: "Pastry can smell fear"

Steven's Musical Pies were created with two separate batches of shortcrust - one for the pie and one for the decoration. The theme was Fleetwood Mac and each pie was decorated to represent a song; Big Love, Storms, Angel and Song Bird.


https://www.rte.ie/lifestyle/food/20...ke-off-pastry/
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  #1511  
Old 10-10-2017, 02:11 PM
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Alan Webber: Classic rock is just getting old

No, that does not mean I am giving up on the greatest music ever made. What is meant by the title of this column, other than a blatant attempt to get your attention, is that our rock icons are aging and disappearing at a rather alarming rate.

For some peculiar reason, I keep track in my blog a list of the rockers who have passed away. Coming off the heels of some of the giants in rock music who passed away in 2016, such as David Bowie, Glenn Frey and Prince, 2017 seems to have not gotten any better. Passing this year have been Butch Trucks and Gregg Allman of the Allman Brothers Band, as well as Paul O'Neil, the founder of the Trans-Siberian Orchestra, Glenn Campbell and, most recently, Tom Petty. Allman's passing was somewhat of a punch in the gut to me.

The fact is, these rockers are getting to an age that the ailments that are taking everyone else we know and love are finally catching up to them as well. Some are just getting plain old! This was really brought home to me when I read that Ian Hunter, founder of Mott the Hoople ("Cleveland Rocks"), recently put out a new album with a new band. It also mentioned Mr. Hunter is 78 years old. And he is still putting out new rock and roll? That means touring and late nights. I can't hardly stay out past 10 o'clock anymore and he's out touring!

That got me thinking of some other musicians still rockin' on. Consider the ages of some of these folks:

James Taylor and Robert Plant (Led Zeppelin) are both 69. Looks to me like Robert might be 169! Even Ozzy Osbourne is now 69 – how is he even still alive? All are still on tour.

Also, still on the road are Carlos Santana (who recently married his drummer), Bob Weir of Grateful Dead, Mick Fleetwood of Fleetwood Mac, Elton John and Joe Walsh of the Eagles. They are all 70 years of age. So is Ian Anderson of Jethro Tull. Evidently, he isn't too old to rock and rock nor too young to die.

David Gilmour of Pink Floyd, who I saw last year in concert, is 71, too, same age of Barry Gibb from the Bee Gees.

Bob Seger recently went back on tour at 72, same age as Eric Clapton, Neil Young and Carly Simon. I went to a Seger concert recently and believe he put more energy into the first song that night than I did the whole weekend.

Carole King of "Tapestry" fame is 74. Bob Dylan mumbled he is 76 … I think. Grace Slick of Jefferson Airplane will be 78 shortly – go to the website and see what the rock lifestyle did to her.

You talk about a group of folks run hard and put away wet! The Rolling Stones' Mick Jagger is 74; Keith Richards will be 74 in December; Ronnie Wood just turned 70; and drummer Charlie Watts is 76. They are still rocking and one of the top revenue acts in the world. Original bass player, Bill Wyman, who retired, is now 81. The man that took Bill's place, Daryl Jones, is a relative baby at 55. That brings up a great quote – "there are only two things on Earth that can survive a nuclear holocaust – cockroaches and Keith Richards."

Surviving Beatles Paul McCartney is 75 and Ringo Starr is 77. Are you like me and wondered if they ever put a microphone on Ringo's drumming? When John Lennon was asked if Ringo was one of rock's best drummers, he replied that Ringo wasn't even the best drummer in the Beatles.

John Mayall of the Blues Breakers fame (with Eric Clapton) will be 84 in November and still recording. How?

Are you getting the point? No wonder they seem to be leaving us at an alarming rate. They are getting to an age when people start developing illnesses that can bring about their demise. And these guys lived a life that made ours look like choirboys and nuns.

And if all that has not made you feel really old, consider this — The song "Free Bird" was released 44 years ago and "Stairway to Heaven" 46 years ago. And the next time you are singing "Hey Jude," remember that song is now 49 years old.

But, don't ever stop rocking on to the greatest music ever made. Those songs sound as good today as they did all those decades ago.



http://www.daily-journal.com/opinion...389151ba3.html
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  #1512  
Old 10-12-2017, 04:58 PM
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Green Rabbit

When I was 4, my favorite band was Fleetwood Mac. I didn’t know it was called that, but I could recognize it anywhere — at the first strains of Stevie Nicks, I left whatever I was doing and ran into the living room, bunches of Beanie Babies squeezed in my fists. My mom says I shouted “moosic, moosic” as I ran in dizzying circles around the edge of the carpet.

She would stand at the edge of the room, arms crossed, bemused smile settled on her lips, and watch my little legs stumble around in tempoless joy. My dad would hover by the stereo, flipping through his collection of discs.

I fidgeted in the middle of the carpet while he cued up the next tune. Sometimes I would wander over and watch his precise search for the one he wanted. I tilted my head back and looked up at the rows and rows of rainbowy saucers boxed neatly in translucent Tupperware.

My dad liked music in a surface way. Outside of my favorite Fleetwood Mac songs, things played once or twice, never again; it was a point of pride. He had collected more music than he could ever listen to, so he only listened to what he wanted to hear.

Sometimes, other people’s love of the music you’re playing is only a side effect of the feeling you get from playing that music for yourself.

As I grew up, the stereo collected dust. My dad moved his collection to an iTunes catalog of thousands that he funneled into his ears with expensive headphones — he didn’t play his music out loud anymore. I told him I missed it, so when I was 9, he gave me my first iPod: a second-generation shuffle, lime-colored, named “Green Rabbit.”

From his desktop computer, he downloaded a gigabyte of his music collection onto it, dropping the small, shiny block into my palm — “Here you go, I hope you enjoy it.”

Like the multitude of sounds I had heard coming from the stereo speakers, “Green Rabbit” was enormous and directionless.

Finding a song I loved was unusual in the unordered, unlabeled mass of hundreds that I now, all of a sudden, owned. All of the music in “Green Rabbit” was mine — I played it for myself, through my earbuds, only when I wanted to hear it — but I had no control over it.

I remember finding a song I particularly loved one day — I restarted the song over and over again, listening to it in a loop. When I switched on my iPod the next day, it played me a different song. I listened to “I Love Rock ‘n’ Roll” and “Octopus’s Garden,” waiting for the song I loved to come back, but I couldn’t find it.

At first, I was sad; I tried to remember what it sounded like, but I could only hum myself a few bars of the melody. Then I gave up, and I got used to it.

I played “Edge of Seventeen” for a week and left it behind, swapping it for another, then another, letting my favorite song switch every day, enjoying it fleetingly.

When I was 13, my mom and dad bought me a new iPod. It was as big as my hand, with a touch screen, and an iTunes gift card taped to the top of the box. I created my own music library from scratch, filling it with odds and ends, probably no more than 40 songs in all. I loved scrolling through the list of music I had decided to buy, however short it was. I could select any song by name and listen to over and over again — today, tomorrow, it was always there.

I brought my songs with me everywhere. The day I left my iPod behind in a rental car, I cried.

Now I use Spotify. I still do the same thing — I find a song I love and I listen to it over and over again, letting my favorite parts of it sink into me, hours at a time for days

My friends are often annoyed or at the very least bewildered by me. But I know exactly why I do it. I love the process of getting comfortable with a song. I love the way listening to something 30 times all at once familiarizes you with it — you figure out what your favorite lyric is; you learn the bassline in the bridge so well you can tap it out with your foot while you’re thinking about something else entirely; you begin to associate the song with a certain week of your life.

I don’t think there’s anything wrong with listening to music the way my dad did — that’s the way he liked it. When you’re playing music for yourself, you get to decide that.

And this is the way I like it.



http://www.dailycal.org/2017/10/12/o...-green-rabbit/
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  #1513  
Old Yesterday, 09:44 AM
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Carter Alan’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Diary: October 18 in Classic Rock History

The Traveling Wilburys first album was released on this day in 1988. Each member of the band had a fake ‘showbiz’ name – what was Tom Petty’s?

ANSWER: Charlie T. Wilbury Jr.

What else happened on this day in rock n’ roll history? Here’s the Rock N’ Roll Diary for October 18, from the College of Classic Rock Knowledge – 100.7 WZLX!
On this day in 1968, John Lennon and Yoko Ono were busted in Ringo Starr’s London Apartment for possession of cannabis resin – John pled guilty so police wouldn’t press charges against Yoko, though he swore the drugs were planted by the police.
Also in ’68, Led Zeppelin played London’s Marquee Club, only its 2nd show in England – the band’s manager had trouble booking the show since the group was still unknown, so he booked it under the name “Jimmy Page & The New Yardbirds.”
In 1969, Paul Kantner of the Jefferson Airplane was charged with possession in Honolulu after police caught him crawling through the bushes outside his home smoking a joint.
In 1975, Fleetwood Mac warmed up for Jefferson Starship at the Boston Garden.
In 1988, the Traveling Wilbury’s album “Volume One” was released featuring Tom Petty, Bob Dylan, Roy Orbison, George Harrison, and Jeff Lynne of ELO.
And in 2005, Queen guitarist Brian May was made a commander of the British Empire while Jimmy Page received an order of the British Empire Award from the Queen during a ceremony at Buckingham Palace.
Checking the WZLX ticket stash Jefferson Starship played the garden with Fleetwood Mac in 1975.


http://wzlx.cbslocal.com/2017/10/18/...ock-history-3/
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  #1514  
Old Today, 11:32 AM
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Default Ken plays TAngo song

Today on BBC Radio 2 Ken Bruce played.....
Isn’t it Midnight...from Tango In The Night Album

Can’t ever remember hearing this on radio before.
It’s usually Big Love or Little Lies
Well done Ken !!!

Last edited by sue : Today at 11:33 AM. Reason: Forgot date
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  #1515  
Old Today, 12:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sue View Post
Today on BBC Radio 2 Ken Bruce played.....
Isn’t it Midnight...from Tango In The Night Album

Can’t ever remember hearing this on radio before.
It’s usually Big Love or Little Lies
Well done Ken !!!
I love her vocal on that song. It's so pure.
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